66 episodes

Timely issues, messy discussions on diversity, and complex answers to keep your brain simmering all week long. The [un]phased podcast is an unabashed deep dive into the complicated nature of who’s in and who’s out in endurance sports and beyond. This podcast will disrupt your normal and challenge your brain to go the distance.

[un]phased, brought to you by the creators of the Outspoken: Women in Triathlon Summit and Live Feisty Media, is an unabashed podcast taking on some hard-to-discuss issues affecting endurance sports, triathlon, and our lives.

[un]phased podcast [un]phased podcast

    • Sports
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

Timely issues, messy discussions on diversity, and complex answers to keep your brain simmering all week long. The [un]phased podcast is an unabashed deep dive into the complicated nature of who’s in and who’s out in endurance sports and beyond. This podcast will disrupt your normal and challenge your brain to go the distance.

[un]phased, brought to you by the creators of the Outspoken: Women in Triathlon Summit and Live Feisty Media, is an unabashed podcast taking on some hard-to-discuss issues affecting endurance sports, triathlon, and our lives.

    Race: Continuing the Conversation (Episode 64)

    Race: Continuing the Conversation (Episode 64)

    Last week Shaunna and Lisa encouraged us all not to resist talking about race. But how do we begin? For many of us, especially white people, talking about race is not a skill that we are taught. We may want to engage in these conversations but are not sure how, or where to start. What is important however is that we do start.

    When engaging in conversations about race we should be intentional both in the topic of the conversation and also in the language that we use. North American culture has historically been very euphemistic when it comes to talking about racism, especially the history of black Americans. This minimizes and romanticizes the enslavement of millions of people. Part of the intentionality in our language when engaging in conversations about race is naming the oppressors, instead of naming the oppressed or the minority. This shift in language exposes those that are responsible for the oppression, and takes the blame off of the oppressed group.

    As we said last week, these conversations are really f%#*^!g hard, but they are also very important. Without these challenging conversations change will never be made. We have to enter into them with respect, but not be afraid to have them.

    To learn more about Feisty Triathlon Coaching, and get on the waitlist go to: https://www.feistytriathlon.com/feisty-triathlon-coaching

    Support the podcast and use our sponsor codes!
    InsideTracker: 25% off at insidetracker.com/feisty
    Nuun Hydration: 30% off with code StayFeisty at nuunlife.com

    • 44 min
    Let’s Talk About Race (Episode 63)

    Let’s Talk About Race (Episode 63)

    Talking about race is really F%$*&^g hard. It is. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t do it. If we constantly duck and dodge frank conversations about how race affects our daily lives, then we will not resolve the persistent hold racial inequity has on our culture and our sporting lives and loves. This week, spurred by article after article speculating on what happened in the Virginia gubernatorial race, we thought we would talk directly about why we resist talking about race.

    We, well, mostly white people, skirt the issue of race. We talk about it in veiled ways - crime, education, parenting, work ethic - because we have been taught implicitly and explicitly that to talk about race is itself racist. White people are worried about race discussions in school because we have been fed a steady diet of “colorblindness” throughout our lives. White people’s hyper-sensitivity around race, particularly when it comes to White-Black relations in the U.S. context, is built on a common sense of guilt about the U.S.’s “original sin” -- slavery. Slavery -- via the Middle Passage -- happened here. The enslavement of African (and Asian!) people, the violence enacted against them, the rape and murder of enslaved people by white slaveholders, the fracturing of enslaved people’s families for white profit is real and cannot be denied.

    Talking about the legacy of this history is not racist towards white people. Racism is a system of racial hierarchy where whiteness is at the top and Blackness is at the bottom. This hierarchy is woven through everything, whether it is housing loans, red-lining, public education, generational wealth, or sport. To deny the effects of racial violence and segregation on our lives today is to willfully ignore this history. It is not racist to recognize the effects of slavery, nor is it a statement that all white people are racist. Racism exists in the fabric of the U.S., and yeah, it sucks to acknowledge that. Teaching upcoming generations about this legacy equips them with the tools the rest of us (white people) weren’t given - the ability to talk about and understand the implications of race and its social construction to maintain white power. In this sense, we will be enabling the next generation of athletes to build systems that are smart and nimble, able to institute practices and policies that resist the effects of this history. We have to be able to talk about this as an endurance sport community -- and, just like in endurance sport -- embrace the suck. Embrace the discomfort as growing a muscle rather than experiencing an injury. It won’t be easy, and it might feel sad or gross or painful. But, burying our collective head in the sand because it is easier hurts us more.


    Support the podcast and use our sponsor codes!
    BLACK FRIDAY: InsideTracker Black Friday Sale from November 22nd-29th (insidetracker.com/feisty) Save $200 off the Ultimate Plan + a free InnerAge test with code FEISTYGIFT or get 25% off sitewide
    InsideTracker: 25% off at insidetracker.com/feistytriathlon
    Nuun Hydration: 30% off with code StayFeisty at nuunlife.com

    • 36 min
    Back in the Blocks: 2021 Outspoken Summit Recap(Episode 62)

    Back in the Blocks: 2021 Outspoken Summit Recap(Episode 62)

    This week on the podcast Shaunna and Lisa are recapping a few of their favorite moments from the 2021 Outspoken Summit. The theme for this year’s summit was “Back in the Blocks” and the pair discuss how the speakers, sessions, roundtables and other attendees have inspired them to keep advocating for and initiating change in the sport of triathlon.

    To purchase the Outspoken Summit replays go to www.feistytriathlon.com

    To get more information on the Shift Sports leadership academy go to: https://forms.gle/SWiwRxPormTydTMv8

    I am athlete podcast: https://houseofathlete.com/

    UN Climate Conference “World Leaders Reach Climate Agreement”: https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-environment/2021/11/13/cop26-glasgow-climate-deal/


    Support the podcast and use our sponsor codes!
    InsideTracker: 25% off at insidetracker.com/feistytriathlon
    Nuun Hydration: 30% off with code StayFeisty at nuunlife.com

    • 35 min
    You Can Run, But You Can’t Hide (Episode 61)

    You Can Run, But You Can’t Hide (Episode 61)

    On this week’s episode, Shaunna and Lisa discuss “The Great Resignation” and how it has been affected by, as well as contributed to, DEI efforts in many organizations. The pandemic has forced many folks to re-evaluate what they want - and need - in their workplaces and leadership. With a shift in how and where many people work, organizations have the opportunity to redefine their workplaces and attract a more diverse workforce through hiring practices, DEI initiatives, and policy change. It is important however, that these efforts and initiatives are genuine. If organizations only make flimsy acknowledgements of the importance of DEI as a tool to attract potential employees, they may actually end up pushing people away that can see through the thin veil of words that do not match actions. Employees, especially those in Gen Z, are savvy enough to look at both words and actions. Many workers in this generation will hold their employer to high DEI standards and if those standards are not realized, they will leave organizations approaching DEI insincerely.

    For more on the “Great Resignation”;
    https://nextpivotpoint.com/great-resignation-diversity/

    https://hbr.org/2021/09/who-is-driving-the-great-resignation

    https://hbr.org/2021/09/the-great-resignation-doesnt-have-to-threaten-your-dei-efforts


    Hell Yeah or Hell Nah
    Hell Yeah: https://www.nascar.com/news-media/2021/06/24/nascar-wins-sports-league-of-the-year-at-2021-sports-business-awards/

    Hell NaH: Gov Abbot signs anti-trans bill into law requiring public school children competing in interscholastic competition must play on teams that match their sex assigned at birth. HB 25, signed Monday 10/25, takes effect Jan 18th 2022
    (BS - cos affirmative action is a no no to remedy past racial discrimination, so this is really about gender and maintaining patriarchal power)

    https://www.npr.org/2021/10/27/1049634164/texas-new-law-restricts-transgender-athletes-participation-on-school-sports-team

    • 37 min
    Frankenstein DEI (Episode 60)

    Frankenstein DEI (Episode 60)

    On today’s episode, Shaunna and Lisa dive into the specific skills a DEI professional needs to have to do the work well. The podcast has previously covered the need for companies to hire an outside DEI professional. They have warned against “giving” the job to the person of color or woman in their agency without knowing their capacity to facilitate change or paying them any extra for their labor. Today, Shaunna and Lisa outline the kinds of skills and attributes listeners should look for when hiring a DEI consultant or creating a permanent DEI position. A lot of money is being spent on workplace DEI transformation initiatives, but the hosts encourage listeners not to throw their money at the issue without doing their research. There are hundreds of DEI consultants nationwide and no clear standard for how to assess their legitimacy or skill to guide organizations through the process of change. To find out the key traits to look for when hiring, listen to this week’s [un]phased. It may just save you some money!

    Good read: Inside the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Industrial Complex

    Halyna Hutchins: Film World Mourns ‘incredible artist’ and seeks answers


    To register for the Outspoken Women in Triathlon Summit go to outspokesummit.com/register
    Support the podcast and use our sponsor codes!
    InsideTracker: 25% off at insidetracker.com/feistytriathlon
    Nuun Hydration: 30% off with code StayFeisty at nuunlife.com

    • 37 min
    Think About How You Hire(archy) (Episode 59)

    Think About How You Hire(archy) (Episode 59)

    In 2020, the state of Colorado passed a law requiring equal pay for equal work. As part of this law, companies must include salaries when posting new positions. Somewhat unexpectedly, the fallout of this law has been that many non-Colorado companies are choosing to exclude Colorado applicants from their process. They argue disclosing salaries affects their competitive edge when hiring candidates. These same companies do not also want to seem like they do not support women’s salary equity in the workplace. This conflict contributes to the ongoing discussion on equitable hiring practices in the United States. Bias and a lack of transparency in hiring processes continue to contribute to the lack of equal pay for women, trans folks, and people of color.

    Shaunna and Lisa dive into a number of strategies companies can implement to make their hiring processes more fair. They explain how these strategies will help companies ensure they are selecting applicants based on their qualifications, not their identity, marital status, or proximity to the job (to name a few). They also discuss how mentorship programs can help retain new employees, providing them with growth and development opportunities within the company. These programs can help diversify organizations by providing opportunities for development to every employee and not just a small few.

    Shaunna and Lisa cap off the episode with their new segment “Hell Yeah, or Hell Naw!” If you have companies or organizations that you would like to give a “Hell Yeah” or a “Hell Naw” to send us an email or voice memo to info@unphasedpodcast.com.

    Support the podcast and use our sponsor codes!
    InsideTracker: 25% off at insidetracker.com/feistytriathlon
    Nuun Hydration: 30% off with code StayFeisty at nuunlife.com

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Sports

You Might Also Like