100 episodes

An aviation podcast by aviation geeks for anyone who looks up when they hear an airplane fly overhead. Listen in as Ian Petchenik and Jason Rabinowitz bring you aviation news, views, and special guests for a half hour every other week. If you're a new avgeek or just can't get enough aviation in your life, get your avgeek fix with us.

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast Flightradar24

    • Aviation
    • 4.8 • 155 Ratings

An aviation podcast by aviation geeks for anyone who looks up when they hear an airplane fly overhead. Listen in as Ian Petchenik and Jason Rabinowitz bring you aviation news, views, and special guests for a half hour every other week. If you're a new avgeek or just can't get enough aviation in your life, get your avgeek fix with us.

    AvTalk Episode 98: The MAX is back

    AvTalk Episode 98: The MAX is back

    On this episode, The Air Current’s Jon Ostrower joins us to discuss the FAA’s approval of the changes to the 737 MAX and the withdrawal of its grounding order, clearing the way for the aircraft to begin its return to commercial service. We also discuss major developments in aviation business as Korean Air is set to take over Asiana Airlines and Norwegian is filing for financial protection as it seeks to restructure. And… a 737 hit a bear in Alaska.

    The MAX is back — In conversation with Jon Ostrower

    20 months after the aircraft was ordered grounded, the FAA has approved its return to service. The Air Current’s Jon Ostrower joins us to explain it all. There are software changes, wiring re-routing, and in-depth training for pilots still needed before the MAX can carry passengers. We look at where the program stands now and what’s likely to happen moving forward. We also explore what’s next for regulators, Boeing, the airlines, and the traveling public.

    Read more from Ostrower on the historical context of the 737 MAX grounding and what lessons can be learned from the grounding of the DC-10

     

    Norwegian files for examinership in Ireland

    Following the Norwegian government’s denial of additional funding, Norwegian Air is seeking financial protection in Ireland (where its aircraft assets are based). We look at how Norwegian got here through a combination of overreach and a string of very bad luck.

    An-124 suffers engine failure in Russia

    A Volga-Dnper Airlines An-124 suffered an uncontained engine failure on departure from Novosibirsk—possibly as the result of a wildlife encounter. The engine failure caused multiple system failures, including brakes, radio communications, and all electrical systems. The aircraft was brought safely back to the airport, but experienced a runway excursion on landing, likely due to not having any brakes. The electrical failure also explains why the ADS-B data stops suddenly.

    Korean Air to take over Asiana Airlines

    Korean Air will take over beleaguered Asiana Airlines, making the combined airline one of the world’s largest. We discuss the rationale for the take over and see at what the combined airlines might look like.

    Preparing a COVID-19 vaccine for transport

    We discuss the recent good news from Pfizer and Moderna and look at some of the challenges ahead for the global supply chain as aviation is set to form the backbone of any vaccine distribution.



    * Thread from John Walton about the temperature challenges

    * Video from Wendover Productions that Jason mentioned



    Let us know what you think

    Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.

    • 1 hr 7 min
    AvTalk Episode 97: The Piston-powered Episode

    AvTalk Episode 97: The Piston-powered Episode

    On this episode of AvTalk, the impossible has happened—Berlin’s Brandenburg Airport is open! We welcome Matthew Colbert, founder of Empire Aviation Services to learn more about how small airports are seeing their air service affected by COVID-19. Plus, Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren joins us for a piston-powered adventure.

    Berlin’s Brandenburg Airport is finally open

    After nearly 10 years of delays, Berlin’s Brandenburg Airport is finally open. The airport inaugurated flights this past weekend with two special arrivals from the airports largest airlines, Lufthansa and easyJet. But in appropriate fashion, things didn’t work out exactly as planned.

    Ten years since QF32

    This week marks 10 years since Qantas flight QF32 suffered an uncontained engine failure shortly after departure from Singapore. The aircraft suffered substantial damage, but the crew were able to safely return to Singapore and no one onboard or on the ground was injured.

    The A220’s unique ‘song’

    We return to our discussion of the A220s unique whale song with excellent evidence courtesy of a listener. You can clearly hear the sound in this video of a Swiss A220 in London.

    HiFly says bye bye to their A380

    HiFly announced it will not renew the lease on their A380 and instead take a few A330s to meet their capacity needs.

    How are small airports affected by COVID?

    We chat with Matthew Colbert, founder of Empire Aviation Services, to learn how small airports have been affected by COVID-19 and some of the ways they’re responding to gain and keep air service.

    Note: Cape Air is a Part 121 operator, not Part 135.

     

    A flat-lined recovery

    We look at the numbers and they’re not great. The recovery of commercial flights has stalled, but there are some bright spots around the world.

    A piston-powered adventure

    Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren joins us to discuss his flight aboard the last flying DC-7. You can see photos from that flight and read more about the DC-7 in Business Insider.

    Let us know what you think

    Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    AvTalk Episode 96: Everything is strange and nothing makes sense

    AvTalk Episode 96: Everything is strange and nothing makes sense

    On this episode of AvTalk, the longest flight in the world is set to return soon, but with a few twists. European regulators are moving forward with recertification of the 737 MAX and Cathay Pacific closes its Cathay Dragon subsidiary. Plus, we discuss what’s keeping the avgeek in us going while we’re grounded.

    Checking in on Steve

    Last episode, Steve Giordano of Jet Test & Transport joined us for a fascinating conversation. He mentioned that after we recorded our episode he would be flying a 737 freighter to New Zealand.  Well, he did do that, but this happened along the way.

    Singapore Airlines bringing back the world’s long flight—with a twist

    Singapore Airlines will relaunch its Singapore-New York service next month, but will move the service from Newark Airport to JFK. Additionally, instead of the A350ULR with only business and premium economy seating, the route will be served by a standard A350, meaning passengers will have the ability to enjoy regular economy seating for nearly 20 hours. We discuss why Singapore is bringing the flight back and what’s driving the changes.

    EU says 737 MAX recertification coming soon

    The director of the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) said last week that the 737 MAX is moving forward with recertifcation there and there would soon be an Airworthiness Directive available for public comment.

    Cathay Pacific cuts thousands of jobs, closes Cathay Dragon

    Cathay Pacific announced this week it will cuts nearly 6,000 jobs and close operations at subsidiary Cathay Dragon. Flights formerly operated by Cathay Dragon will be divided among Cathay Pacific and low-cost carrier HK Express. Cathay also said it is deferring deliveries of the 777X to “after 2025”.

    US Department of Defense completes study of COVID transmission on aircraft

    The US DOD and United Airlines performed a study on COVID transmission on aircraft and we discuss the results and why it still doesn’t leave us wanting to fly anytime soon.

    Meet the new boss, same as the old boss

    The Italian government has decided to create a successor airline to Alitalia. Beyond that, who knows what’s happening.

    The rundown

    Etihad flight 88 became the first Gulf-based airline flight to overfly Israel. Shortly after that, Etihad conducted the first passenger flight to Israel by a Gulf-based airline. Wizz Air has taken delivery of an ex-Qatar Airways Cargo A330F on behalf of the Hungarian government. Southwest is moving north and will start flights from Chicago-O’Hare and Houston (IAH) next year. Zip Air’s first passenger flight had 2 people on it. Airbus delivered the 1500th A330, an A330neo to Delta Air Lines. Airbus also delivered A320 family MSN 10,000 to Middle East Airlines and the first A220 assembled in the US, which happens to be the first for Delta.

    Let us know what you think

    Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.

     

     

    • 48 min
    Buddy Start

    Buddy Start

    On this episode of AvTalk, the FAA releases the Flight Standardization Board Report for the 737 MAX, which details the training pilots will need before they can fly the aircraft. And we’re joined by Steve Giordano of Jet Test and Transport to learn about a fascinating niche in the aviation industry.

    737 MAX training standards released

    The FAA Flight Standardization Board released its draft standards for pilot training for the 737 MAX. We discuss the 5 major tasks pilots will need to accomplish and what else remains as the MAX moves toward certification.

    Boeing moving all 787 production to South Carolina

    As expected, Boeing is moving all 787 production to South Carolina. What does this mean for the 787 and what might it mean for Boeing’s footprint in the Pacific Northwest?

    COVID-related changes

    Some airlines are converting more aircraft to cargo configurations, others are saying goodbye to aircraft early. And some airlines are starting new routes they wouldn’t normally consider. We run down the ways COVID continues to affect how airlines are managing.

    Steve Giordano — Jet Test and Transport

    From returning 5 737s to their lessor across and ocean in the middle of a pandemic to making sure a recent cargo conversion meets regulatory requirements, Steve Giordano and his team at Jet Test and Transport are busy these days. We talk with Steve about one of the most unusual and interesting jobs in aviation.

    Let us know what you think

    Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    What a mess

    What a mess

    On this episode of AvTalk, the last A380 rolls out of assembly, more aircraft are slated for storage, and we dig in to some of the more noteworthy comments on the FAA’s proposed 737 MAX airworthiness directive.

    The Final A380

    The final Airbus A380 (MSN 272) rolled out of assembly this week, bringing the A380 closer to the end of production.

    More aircraft headed into long-term storage

    Lufthansa announced this week that its A380 fleet and much of its A340-600 will now be placed in stasis, unlikely to ever fly with the airline again. Meanwhile, Delta is sending their 737-700 fleet into retirement and their 777 fleet is scheduled to make its final flight this fall.

    Flights to nowhere gain popularity, but at what cost?

    Flights to nowhere, like Qantas ‘Great Southern Land Tour’ that sold out in 10 minutes last week, are gaining popularity with airlines as a way to generate revenue.

    737 MAX Comments

    The public comment period on the FAA’s 737 MAX proposed airworthiness directive is coming to an end and we dig through some of the more noteworthy comments, including those of former Boeing engineers, the families of ET302 crash victims, and the UAE’s civil aviation authority.

    • 44 min
    Shimmy Shake

    Shimmy Shake

    On this episode of AvTalk we’ve got jet packs, a bunch of helium balloons with an ADS-B transponder, and The Air Current’s Jon Ostrower joins us to discuss the new quality issues affecting the 787 and the subsequent FAA investigation.

    August traffic levels off

    We begin with a review of August traffic stats and it’s not great. But Airbus and Boeing did deliver a few aircraft and both booked orders, with Airbus adding a single ACJ320neo to its backlog.

    Strange aviation

    In a strange turn of events, multiple pilots reported seeing a ‘guy in a jetpack’ on approach to LAX last week. Meanwhile in Arizona, illusionist David Blaine strapped himself to a bunch of helium balloons and ascended to 25,000 feet before parachuting back to earth.

    El Al flies to the UAE

    El Al made its first ever flight to the United Arab Emirates last week and crossed Saudi Arabian airspace. Additional private flights between the two countries have taken place in the days since.

    Fresh 787 issues lead to FAA investigation

    Two week’s ago The Air Current’s Jon Ostrower broke the news that eight 787s had been grounded due to the presence of two manufacturing quality issues on those aircraft that when combined mean the aircraft structure may not meet load specifications. This week Ostrower reported on a new FAA investigation looking into those and additional quality issues affecting the 787. He joins the program this week to fill us in.

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
155 Ratings

155 Ratings

L M K 72 ,

L M K 72

As someone that has had keen interest in aviaiton since I was a small child I really enjoy this podcast. I really enjoy Ian & Jason's humour and the guests. Overall I have enjoyed listing to each episode since the start of the pandemic in the UK whilst I have been working from home. Looking forward to epsiode 100 . Thanks in what is strangest of times that little bit more interesting. Keep up the great work.

comet1a ,

737max

I’m here in the UK and I’ve just listened to your last 3 podcasts,and I’m addicted!
Question! With all the electronics keeping the max in the air will it glide as the 320 did on leaving New York! If it’s that much out of balance that it needs so much I don’t think so!
Regards.
Peter.

Wilm0r ,

Better than I thought

I love aviation but that doesn't mean I'll listen to anything aircrafts related for an hour.

FR24 podcasts so far have in fact managed to stay interesting for that long though.

Also like how they're taking the environmental impact of aviation seriously instead of ignoring inconvenient truths as some avgeeks like to do.

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