24 episodes

the human experience in the non-human world: discussion and experiences on location and in the studio

beneath the stream beneaththestream

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0, 3 Ratings

the human experience in the non-human world: discussion and experiences on location and in the studio

    24. The Wolf

    24. The Wolf

    “Only the mountain has lived long enough to listen objectively to the howl of a wolf”, Aldo Leopold. Prejudices, storytelling, popular culture and medieval demonisation populate the landscape we have created for the wolf; one that often bears little resemblance to the harsh and diverse landscapes they actually call home.
    However, it is as a non-human creature that can seem all too human in its habits, that we humans seem to struggle the most. In this podcast we ponder the history of our relationship with wolves, the detail of how they live and where, the motifs we have created and how they live alongside us, and increasingly so. What is our future alongside wolves? What is the wolf’s future alongside us?
    MUSIC BY COLIN WILLIAMS
    Some of the ideas and references we make in this podcast can be found here:
    Yellowstone National Park Theodore Roosevelt Aldo Leopold David Mech Doug SmithJim Halfpenny Dan Hartman Red Hot Chilli Peppers Rudyard Kipling Nunamiut Inupiat of Alaska Blackfoot ConfederacyPawnee Zuni Fenrir Lupa romana Little Red Riding Hood Aesop’s Fables Three Little Pigs Big Bad Wolf  Of Wolves and Men - Barry Lopez The Great American Wolf - Bruce Hampton The Grey - Liam Neeson Werewolves of London - Warren Zevon The Colour of Money Sasquatch An American Werewolf in London Rietschen  Trophic cascade E O WilsonEd Bangs

    • 47 min
    23. Interspecies ~ language between us?

    23. Interspecies ~ language between us?

    “Long ago when animals could speak …”. In this episode we explore the boundary lines between non-human species and ourselves, boundary lines that many indigenous peoples - and our ancestors - did not see, and the ability, or not for communication to pass across that boundary. Today, for western society, it is only in children’s novels that animals can speak and be heard.
    So much is invested by animals in the biology of communication and we can teach creatures about human communication but is it inconceivable that they have an ability to speak to us in their form? In maintaining scientific distance do we only allowed artists and musicians to show us that other species have ‘language’ and we should not treat the non-human as less than ourselves?
     
    THEME MUSIC BY DAVID ROTHENBERG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. USED BY KIND PERMISSION OF THE ARTIST http://www.davidrothenberg.net 
    TOGETHER WITH ADDITIONAL MUSIC IN THIS EPISODE BY DAVID ROTHENBERG
    Some of the ideas and references we make in this podcast can be found here:
    Sitting Bull https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sitting_Bull Tales from Ovid - Ted Hughes https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tales_from_Ovid Chaser - border collie https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaser_(dog) Kanzi - bonobo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanzi Raven https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RavenGreater Honeyguide https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_honeyguideRed-tailed Hawk https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red-tailed_hawk Watership Down https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watership_Down The Jungle Book https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Jungle_Book The Chronicles of Narnia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chronicles_of_Narnia John Masefield https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_MasefieldSperm Whale https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sperm_whale Orca or Killer Whale https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killer_whale Blue Whale https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_whale Corky https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corky_(killer_whale) David Rothenberg http://www.davidrothenberg.net Thousand Mile Song https://www.theguardian.com/books/2008/jun/07/scienceandnature Birds Why Birds Sing https://www.theguardian.com/books/2005/dec/10/featuresreviews.guardianreview5 Bug Music https://www.bugmusicbook.com Eisteddfod https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eisteddfod Jim Nollman https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Nollman Dolphin Dreamtime http://www.doyletics.com/_arj1/dolphind.htm Kamchatka https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamchatka_Peninsula Henry Beston https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Beston Tree networks https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-whispering-trees-180968084/ Plants and sound https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_bioacoustics Himalayan Balsam https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impatiens_glandulifera David Abram https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_AbramBecoming Animal https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/318/becoming-animal-by-david-abram/ Prince Charles https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles,_Prince_of_Wales Real Magic - Dean Radin https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/551604/real-magic-by-dean-radin-phd/ Day of the Triffids - John Wyndham https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_of_the_Triffids Evelyn Glennie https://www.evelyn.co.uk Monica Gagliano https://www.monicagagliano.com Plant Consciousness https://www.plantconsciousness.com Plant Intelligence and the Imaginal World - Stephen Harrod Buhner https://www.stephenharrodbuhner.com/about/ Kurukindi https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZ77sYSqD6o 

    • 46 min
    22. The River ~ all things merge into one

    22. The River ~ all things merge into one

    The human and the non-human claim rivers as their own. By the banks of the River Kennet we conjour with our thoughts and experiences of rivers waters, along with those of a diverse cast of that includes: Roger Deakin, Bruce Springsteen, Norman Maclean, Masuru Emoto, Feargal Sharkey, Icy Sedgewick, Lewis Mumford, Michael Harner, Bedřich Smetana and Joseph Conrad.
    We take in the travels, contours, myths, creatures, stories and spirits of rivers such as the: Awash, Tigris, Indus, Yellow, Nile, Danube, Amazon, Alde, Namada, Volga, Boyne, Crystal, Laxa, Congo, Moldau, Tana, and Everglades. We fight over them, deify them, we use them and misuse them, and yet what runs through them, because of us and despite us, is the the lifeblood of our world.
    THEME MUSIC BY DAVID ROTHENBERG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. USED BY KIND PERMISSION OF THE ARTIST http://www.davidrothenberg.net 
    Some of the ideas and references we make in this podcast can be found here:
     
    The River Kennet https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Kennet Water Crowfoot https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ranunculus_aquatilis Water Vole https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_water_voleGrass Snake https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grass_snake Reed Bunting https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_reed_bunting Brown Trout https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_troutBrook Lamprey https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brook_lampreyCrayfish https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austropotamobius_pallipesMayfly https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MayflyCaddisfly https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CaddisflyAwash River https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Awash_RiverRiver Tigris https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TigrisRiver Indus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indus_RiverYellow River https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_RiverRiver Nile https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NileRiver Danube https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danube River Amazon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_RiverRiver Alde https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Alde Emperor Claudius https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claudius Boudicca https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boudica Pied Kingfisher https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pied_kingfisher Water Monitor https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_water_monitor Lewis Mumford https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_Mumford River Namada https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narmada_River River Volga https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volga_River Isis https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isis River Boyne https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Boyne Kelpie https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelpie Morgan https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morgen_(mythological_creature) Personhood for rivers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Environmental_personhood Animism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animism Roger Deakin https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Deakin West Indian Manatee https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Indian_manatee Crystal River https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_River,_Florida The Salmon of Knowledge https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmon_of_Knowledge Laxa https://www.nat.is/laxa-river/ Kushtaka, Tlingit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kushtaka Selkie https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selkie Amazon River Dolphin https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_river_dolphin The Grindylow https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grindylow Icy Sedgewick http://www.icysedgwick.com Peg Powla https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peg_Powler Hamish Henderson https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamish_Henderson Goðafoss https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goðafoss Michael Harner https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Harner Mircia Eliade https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mircea_Eliade Achuar https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achuar The Fighting Temeraire https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fighting_Temeraire Heart of Darkness https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heart_of_Darkness River Congo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Congo_River Apocalypse Now https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apocalypse_Now Bruce Springsteen https://en.wikipedia.o

    • 44 min
    21. Sea Voices: siren voices

    21. Sea Voices: siren voices

    How do we each respond to the environmental alarms that are being sounded by climate, nature, youth and the ocean? In this episode we feature interviews with Roger Hardy and Rhett Griffiths - wave-tossed thoughts from the tideline of the North Sea - plus a recording of Rhett’s epic poem ‘The Tipping Tide’.
    Artists suggest different ways of seeing the world and, in response to these issues and as part of Siren Festival in 2019, artist and sculptor Roger Hardy created a powerful installation and multiple figurative sculptural piece on Aldeburgh beach entitled ‘Time and Tide’. He also created ‘Lookout’, a human figure gazing out at the sea from the South Beach Lookout. Here was also installed - in written form and in audio recoding - ‘The Tipping Tide’, a poem by Rhett Griffiths.
    With extracts of Colin singing ‘Adieu Sweet Lovely Nancy’, we explore what the sea says to us.
    Some of the ideas and references we make in this podcast can be found here:
    Rhett Griffiths
    poem - The Tipping Tide
    Roger Hardy 
    Siren Festival  Roger Hardy’s ‘Time and Tide’ Roger Hardy and Rhett Griffiths’ 'Lookout' and 'Tipping Tide'  Lancaster Dawlish  Aldeburgh Festival Suffolk Devi Singh  Heathcote Williams  Benjamin Britten South Beach Lookout  Greta Thunberg  School strikes  Mudlarking  Felixstowe 

    • 41 min
    20. Owl ~ mythology, motif and mastery

    20. Owl ~ mythology, motif and mastery

    An archetype, a creature that we impose human ideas, ideals, values and characteristics upon. An unknowable, untouchable creature of the dark, whose call provokes fear and awe. A silent, surreptitious, living breathing feathered predator, whose beyond-human abilities allow it to master the night and span almost every habitat on Earth. Which of these is Owl for you?
    As a family of birds, owls are all of these and more, and we explore their role in human culture from 30,000 years ago to the present day, as well as sharing tales of owl encounters around the globe. Evil messenger and harbinger of Death? Wise councillor and friend from childhood literature? Owl can be what each of us bring to it but is also master of its world.
    THEME MUSIC BY DAVID ROTHENBERG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. USED BY KIND PERMISSION OF THE ARTIST http://www.davidrothenberg.net 
    Some of the ideas and references we make in this podcast can be found here:
    Forest Eagle Owl Sinharaja, Sri Lanka Pliny the Elder Tengmalm’s Owl Florence Nightingale Pablo Picasso Winnie the Pooh Bagpuss  Tawny Owl  Eric Hosking  Ural Owl  Sir David Attenborough  Hawk Owl  Saariselkä, Finland Little Owl  Chauvet Cave, France  Eurasian Scops Owl  Athena  Harry Potter  Western Screech Owl  Hopi  Sokoke Scops Owl, Kenya Aztec god of death  Cider with Rosie, Laurie Lee  Barn Owl  William Wordsworth  Tlingit  Egyptian Book of the Dead  Great Horned Owl Seminole Apache  The Secret Life of the Owl, John Lewis-Stempel  Great Grey Owl Barred Owl  Minnesota, USA  Eurasian Eagle Owl  Eurasian Pygmy Owl  Pel’s Fishing Owl  Blakiston’s Fish Owl  Snowy Owl Twin Peaks, David Lynch  The Messengers, Mike Clelland  Whitley Strieber  Owlman, Cornwall  The Mothman Prophecies, John Keel  Mark Twain  Elf Owl  Short-eared Owl Denmark  Öland, Sweden  Goldcrest “In a hole with an owl” The Fast Show  

    • 48 min
    19. Wilderness 2 ~ is it beyond our reach?

    19. Wilderness 2 ~ is it beyond our reach?

    “What avail are forty freedoms without a blank spot on the map?”, said writer Aldo Leopold, and in this episode we revisit what the human concept of wilderness means and where we might find it. Unmodified, unspoiled, on the edge? When in our history was the point when humans changed their view of wilderness?
    With incidental music from Colin, we consider how wilderness means many differing things to different people - it is ‘home’ for some and hostile for others - and discuss what our view of it says about us. Is our definition derived from an International Union for the Conservation of Nature edict, or is it reflect - or even imposed - by the human approach to the way we make art? Ultimately, is wilderness still a valid notion or is it beyond our reach, beyond our gift to bestow, at a time when perhaps we need it more than ever?
    THEME MUSIC BY DAVID ROTHENBERG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. USED BY KIND PERMISSION OF THE ARTIST http://www.davidrothenberg.net 
    Some of the ideas and references we make in this podcast can be found here:
    Jane Smith Marco Brodde Darren Rees Kitty Jones Chris Wallbank Julian Hoffman Beauchene Island, Falklands Bay of Biscay, France & Spain Pasvik Valley, Norway Unst, Shetland Spitsbergen Hoo Peninsular, EnglandDan Richards IUCN wilderness definition 1B Xia Gui - master chinese painter  Old Testament Paleolithic art Sicily rock art caves  Shan shui - master chinese painter   Thomas Moran The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone (painting) The Sublime (artistic movement)  Sewell Newhouse (trap maker)  Industrial Revolution Snow Storm: Hannibal and his Army Crossing the Alps (painting by J. M. W. Turner) Smithsonian, Washington DC Aboriginal Australian art Shoshone Ansel Adams  BBC Planet Earth John Muir Bushcraft Aldo Leopold Annie Dillard Edward Abbey  Kvitøya Island, Svalbard Barry Lopez  Of Wolves and Men Jordan Bedouin All Things are Quite Silent (English folk song) Franklin Expedition  

    • 42 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture