24 episodes

Brute Norse is a blog and podcast about ancient Scandinavian apocrypha and Viking Weirdness by Eirik Storesund.

Brute Norse Podcast Eirik Storesund

    • History

Brute Norse is a blog and podcast about ancient Scandinavian apocrypha and Viking Weirdness by Eirik Storesund.

    Episode 24: Legends of Drunken Master - The Miracles of St. Thorlak (2019 Holiday Special)

    Episode 24: Legends of Drunken Master - The Miracles of St. Thorlak (2019 Holiday Special)

    In this slightly festive Yuletide episode, Eirik retells some of his favorite miracles associated with Iceland's first (and only) Christian holy man: The frail, picky eating, voluntary celibate, 12th century bishop Þorlákr Þórhallsson. Patron saint of Iceland - and autism!
    Thorlak was a renowned sage who hardly ever touched a drink unless it was alcoholic. He channeled his divine superpowers to heal the mangled, clobber wildlife, punish bullies, and make beer both strong and tasty.
    The episode also touches upon various tidbits of seasonally appropriate errata, such as the mysterious lost Scandinavian saint Sjur, Medieval ethnic stereotypes about sausage-eating Icelanders, and the freshest old news on the Norse lunisolar calendar.

    Get wiseer about the pre-Christian holiday of Jól:
    https://www.brutenorse.com/blog/2017/12/norse-yuletide-sacrifices-had-almost.html

    Looking for a pre-christian lunisolar almanac that fits in your pocket? Check out KwellonTungl: https://www.etsy.com/shop/KwellonTungl

    Support Brute Norse:
    https://www.Patreon.com/brutenorse
    https://www.Teespring.com/stores/brute-norse

    • 28 min
    Ep. 23: Japan's Barbarian Past

    Ep. 23: Japan's Barbarian Past

    In this episode Eirik recounts his Japonic yuletide odyssey of 2018. He takes a comparative, Scandifuturist look at the prehistory of Japan through the Jōmon, Yayoi, and Kofun periods. It's the story of how hunter-gatherer master potters met their demise at the hands of militant, kami-fearing, rice-farming, mound building, Iron Age settlers from the Asian mainland. Strolling backwards with a voyeur's gaze from the streets of Tokyo to the valleys of Gifu, as Japan is staged as a fellow barbarian periphery beyond the ghost of the Roman Empire, to question Classical and Post-Enlightenment assumptions about how humanity ought to cope with the terror of the past, handing out wedgies to the Western canon and national mythologies as we go.

    Support Brute Norse:
    www.brutenorse.com
    www.twitter.com/brutenorse
    www.instagram.com/brutenorse
    www.patreon.com/brutenorse
    www.teespring.com/stores/brute-norse

    Suggested reading:
    - Imamura, Keiji (2003). Prehistoric Japan: New Perspectives on Insular East Asia. Routledge: London

    - Kolstø, Janemil (2007). Rethinking Yasukuni: From Secular Politics to Religious Sacrifice. Master of Arts Thesis. AHKR, University of Bergen: Bergen

    - Hardacre, Helen (2017). Shinto: A History. Oxford University Press: New York

    • 47 min
    Ep. 22: The Bronze Age Flasher (With Aksel Klausen)

    Ep. 22: The Bronze Age Flasher (With Aksel Klausen)

    Aksel returns to the podcast for banter-filled spitballing on ancient Scandinavia and new old news from European prehistory. Whatever happened to that frickin’ viking ship (?) from episode 14, and what's up with these Viking Era mortuary houses?

    Some of the subjects tackled:
    - The Crossroads exhibit at the Art & History Museum, Brussels.
    - Migration period identity.
    - Aksel's time travel hitlist.
    - Preliminary results from the Gjellestad ship excavation.
    - Democratization of Viking burial practice.
    - A phallic stone from Bronze Age Sweden.
    - Iron Age mortuary houses.
    - Eirik's dream burial.
    - Hollow promises of future podcast subjects.
    - The afterlife, reincarnation, and Germanic naming conventions.

    Support Brute Norse:
    www.Patreon.com/brutenorse
    www.teespring.com/stores/brute-norse

    -Topical links-
    Help name the new moons of Saturn:
    https://carnegiescience.edu/NameSaturnsMoons

    Why are adult daughters missing from ancient German cemeteries?
    https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/10/why-are-adult-daughters-missing-ancient-german-cemeteries

    The Crossroads exhibit at the Art & History Museum, Brussels:
    https://www.artandhistory.museum/exhibitions/crossroads

    The recent Gjellestad ship excavations:
    https://www.khm.uio.no/english/about/news/current-issues/we-are-digging-after-a-new-viking-ship%21.html

    "The Rollsbo Penis":
    https://www.thelocal.se/20190926/swedish-archaeologists-find-penis-statue-rollsbo-bronze-age

    A recently excavated Viking Era mortuary house:
    https://www.nrk.no/viten/arkeologer-ved-ntnu-vitenskapsmuseet-har-funnet-restene-fra-et-sjeldent-dodehus-fra-vikingtiden-1.14707210

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Ep. 21: Discussing Dharma with Leornende Eald Englisc

    Ep. 21: Discussing Dharma with Leornende Eald Englisc

    What drives you? In this episode, Eirik sits down for a talk with Kevin from Leornende Eald Englisc, who makes educational youtube videos on Old English informed by his particular spiritual convictions. We talk about linguistics, the problem with translations, old Germanic languages, cosmic law, accepting the passage of history, devotinal service, and the importance of good intent and deeds. May we be reborn and do good deeds again!

    Watch Kevin's content here:
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLnwScGuOxVlaN5aV9in9ag


    Mentioned works:
    Peter Wessel Zapffe, The Last Messiah
    https://philosophynow.org/issues/45/The_Last_Messiah

    Bhagavad Gita
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhagavad_Gita

    Sallust, On the Gods and the World
    https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Sallust_On_the_Gods_and_the_World

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Ep. 20: The Antenna on the Holy Mountain

    Ep. 20: The Antenna on the Holy Mountain

    The natural sciences talk avidly about the geosphere, biosphere, atmosphere, and so on. Less so about the noösphere. The noösphere is the sphere of mind. A term that allows us to conceive of consciousness and information exchange, not just as abstract philosophical notions, but as a massively tangible cosmic force with a concrete, observable influence on the physical world.

    In this episode Eirik reads his essay "The Antenna on the Holy Mountain: Noöspheric meditations on the Norse cargo cult", originally commissioned by the Canadian artist Erin Sexton for the 2018 Noöspherics conference at Lydgalleriet in Bergen, where it formed the introductory chapter to the conference book.

    Written in the shadow of Norway's decision to abandon FM radio for new, digital solutions, this essay explores the noöspheric proposition that our intelligence extends beyond our physical bodies, drawing on crisis, technological collapse, extraterrestrial exploration, and religious ritual, and the noösphere's implications for Eirik's own experience of the antiquarian sciences, and his alienated yearning towards a better understanding of the pre-Christian Scandinavian worldview.

    - Erin Sexton's homepage:
    https://erinsexton.com
    - Topos Publications:
    https://topospublications.com

    Support Brute Norse on https://patreon.com/brutenorse or sweeten my coffee by purchasing a piece of fresh BN merch on https://teespring.com/stores/brute-norse

    • 40 min
    Ep. 19: Norway's Eternal Return

    Ep. 19: Norway's Eternal Return

    In this episode Eirik takes an eldritch look at Norwegian identity, from the mythology and dreams of Iron Age expansionists to the national mythology of state bureaucracy. He attempts to negotiate between the representation, artifice and organism of Norwegianness itself, drawing on Thure Erik Lund's oddball idea of the "True" versus "Norwegian" Norwegians and Nick Land's concept of hyperstition, realizing his own participation in the ongoing ritualization that keeps the Norwegian creature alive.

    • 1 hr 12 min

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