150 episodes

Join us as we talk through clinical cases in the ICU setting, illustrating important points of diagnosis, treatment, and management of the critically ill patient, all in a casual, "talk through" verbal scenario format.

Critical Care Scenarios Brandon Oto, PA-C, FCCM and Bryan Boling, DNP, ACNP, FCCM

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.5 • 15 Ratings

Join us as we talk through clinical cases in the ICU setting, illustrating important points of diagnosis, treatment, and management of the critically ill patient, all in a casual, "talk through" verbal scenario format.

    Lightning rounds 41: Respiratory therapy with Keith Lamb

    Lightning rounds 41: Respiratory therapy with Keith Lamb

    We explore the profession of respiratory therapy in the US, including their role and training and how to optimize our clinical relationships, with Keith Lamb (@kdlamb1), RRT, RRT-ACCS, FAARC, FCCM. Keith is an RT at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, working clinically in neuro/surgical/trauma critical care, who has been active in research and has held a variety of leadership positions.







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    • 40 min
    TIRBO 62: The sweet spot for learning

    TIRBO 62: The sweet spot for learning

    Responsible self-directed learning occurs in a zone between comfort and novelty.







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    • 17 min
    Episode 75: Automatic tube compensation, with Ben Fabry

    Episode 75: Automatic tube compensation, with Ben Fabry

    We discuss the principles and application of automatic tube compensation (ATC) on modern ventilators, with its creator Ben Fabry. Dr. Fabry is a professor and chair of biophysics at University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, originally trained as an electrical engineer, who originally developed ATC as part of his PhD program.







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    Takeaway lessons









    * ATC, originally called “electronic extubation,” is meant to normalize or eliminate the resistance to flow created by the endotracheal tube. Since this resistance is always present, yet is dynamic and varies by flow (and tube size), it creates a continuous confounding variable, making the displayed pressure on the ventilator a measurement not of tracheal pressure, but of another, largely meaningless pressure (the pressure outside the patient).







    * ATC works by increasing airway pressure during spontaneous inspiration to eliminate the pressure gradient created by the tube at the current flow, and reducing it during expiration to reverse the effect.







    * While ATC can be used in any mode, it is mostly meant for pressure support or other spontaneous modes. It has no real role in volume control. In pressure control, it has little meaningful impact during inspiration, although it will reduce the airway pressure below the set PEEP during expiration, which may help facilitate expiration.







    * The original ATC test ventilator could drop pressure below atmospheric pressure during expiration, but this feature is not possible on modern ventilators, so the lowest possible pressure during ATC is zero (probably not quite even, that due to expiratory valve resistance). Some modern vents will not drop pressure during expiration at all.







    * In principal, actual tracheal pressure could be measured by a separate monitoring lumen. In practice, this is dangerous, as the lumen could be occluded by mucus, so the resistance constant is instead applied mathematically. The modifiers were derived empirically by testing a variety of tubes at different flow rates.







    * ATC will generally ask for the tube size. Length has some effect but a fairly trivial one, as resistance is mostly influenced by turbulence, which is mainly a product of diameter. Resistance is not a constant, but increases with (roughly) the square of the flow of gas.







    * A swivel connector on the ETT outlet adds about 1 cm H2O of resistance. An HME adds about 3 cm H2O.







    * Changes in gas composition at different FiO2 changes resistance trivially, although a mix like Heliox would change it significantly, and would make the internal calculations incorrect.







    * No fixed single pressure support value can accurately match tube resistance, due to its dynamic nature during and between breaths, even if you were willing to set the sort of pressure needed—which might be 50+ cm H2O in a strongly breathing patient.







    * The main downside of ATC is that modern ventilators don’t do it very well—they can only vary flow so quickly, so when there are brisk changes in pressure, they fail to match it. They usually can match only about 50% of tube resistance, with the worst at the start of a breath as they lag behind the initial drop in pressure. (You can appreciate this by seeing the airway pressure drop below the set PEEP.) Response is even less in some of the current generation of vents with radial blowers and slower valves







    * Quality check your ATC by watching the tracheal pressure—the vent will display this ...

    • 56 min
    TIRBO 61: How to use POCUS (our expert consensus)

    TIRBO 61: How to use POCUS (our expert consensus)

    Brandon summarizes his recent publication describing best practices for performing POCUS. Read the paper open access at POCUS Journal.







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    • 23 min
    Episode 74: Obstructive shock, with Sarah Lorenzini (Nurses’ Podcrawl 2024)

    Episode 74: Obstructive shock, with Sarah Lorenzini (Nurses’ Podcrawl 2024)

    Our collaboration with Sarah Lorenzini of the Rapid Response RN podcast, discussing a case and general principles for diagnosing and managing obstructive shock. Check out the other episodes on shock in the Nurses’ Podcrawl 2024!







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    • 49 min
    Lightning rounds 40: Critical care medicine fellowships with Nicholas Ghionni

    Lightning rounds 40: Critical care medicine fellowships with Nicholas Ghionni

    We chat about pulmonary/critical care medicine fellowship with recent graduate Nicholas Ghionni (@pulmtoilet), a first-year attending at the MedStar Baltimore Hospital system. He completed PCCM fellowship at MedStar Washington Hospital Center where he also served as chief fellow.







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    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

Happydoc77 ,

Undifferentiated Encephalitis

episode was excellent, so now I’m listening to more.

m_p1989 ,

Brilliant podcast

Fantastic podcast with excellent speakers on regularly, quite easy to listen to.
One of the favourites so far was Episode 27, not particularly knowledgeable about wilderness/ prehospital and this was a fascinating insight, can’t recommend highly enough.

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