41 episodes

I am your host Mattia Scarpazza and I found Looking Into Wine to share knowledge about wine. Focus is on areas that sparked my interest throughout my study years and I wished I’d had more time to explore in more detail. Now it’s time!

Each episode explores a specific topic in detail and how it is relevant to the wine trade.
What to expect? Interviews featuring experts and professionals to guide us through regions, grapes and challenges of vine growing, my own research and much more.

Looking Into Wine Mattia Scarpazza

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 12 Ratings

I am your host Mattia Scarpazza and I found Looking Into Wine to share knowledge about wine. Focus is on areas that sparked my interest throughout my study years and I wished I’d had more time to explore in more detail. Now it’s time!

Each episode explores a specific topic in detail and how it is relevant to the wine trade.
What to expect? Interviews featuring experts and professionals to guide us through regions, grapes and challenges of vine growing, my own research and much more.

    Rose wines sustainability, business and issues with Elizabeth Gabay MW

    Rose wines sustainability, business and issues with Elizabeth Gabay MW

    With the rise in popularity of Rose Wines especially those of the province region,
    A multitude of look-alike rose' have found their way into the markets, from wineries chasing the sales and to the wine region in which rose' have been traditionally made the style has shifted to mimic this of the Provance.

    With my guest today Elizabeth Gabay MW we are exploring the effects of the rose sales growth and production and what controversiality she is seeing in the market.

    From the standardization of Provence winemaking, which is turning into a double edged sword, to the producers outside this region with little to no experience producing Rose reading informational sheets.

    With the rise of Rose production so is the need to increase the number of cooled tanks to produce them which has effects on the sustainability of the wineries and packaging.

    We also talked about Champagne rose and what varieties Elizabeth is getting excited about.

    Elizabeth, just released the book Rosés of Southern France, a monumental task to find incredible rose wines that stand out from the crowd and to educate the reader with maps and infographics the book is available here:
    Rosés of Southern France: Amazon.co.uk: Gabay MW, Elizabeth, Bernheim, Ben: 9798837338021: Books


    If you are enjoying the show consider subscribing and the leave a review
    You have listened to the Looking into Wine Podcast, My guest today was Elizabeth Gabay master of wine.
    This episode marks the end of season two of the Looking Into Wine Podcast after a summer break we will be back for the third season,

    If you got to this point of the message, thank you so much for your support from the bottom of my heart! Mattia

    • 36 min
    Friuli's most invisible yet incredible wine Pignolo with author Ben Little

    Friuli's most invisible yet incredible wine Pignolo with author Ben Little

    Pignolo is promising red grape variety native to the friuli region of northeast Italy, probably first cultivated in the hills of Rosazzo in the colli orientali. Pignolo is a very shy bearer and it was generally ignored by local growers who preferred other, more productive grape varieties until, like schioppettino, it was given a new lease of life by a EU decree of 1978 authorizing its use in the province of Udine. Total plantings of Pignolo Nero were only 93 ha/230 acres according to the 2010 vine census.
    Pignolo is native of the Friuli Venezia Giulia region, in the northeaster corner of Italy
    With Ben Little, we talk about the story of Friulan wines and how Pignolo fits or not in what is Friuli wines in the popular minds.
    First comes the history of Pignolo in the context of the history of its native region, Friuli Venezia Giulia in Italy’s upper right-hand corner. A really interesting explanation of how Pignolo, wine, and the region evolved. Then the history shifts a bit to author Ben Little’s personal experience with Pignolo, which started only a few years ago (2016) but developed quickly and soon involved many others. There is much of a technical nature to learn through Little’s first person reports.
    Ben Little recently release a whopping 492 pages long ode to Pignolo Book called – Pignolo, Cultivating the invisible.
    In our conversation we talked about Pignolo, the history and the wider geopolitical influences of this deeply dark red skinned variety. We talked about how it can create some of the most soulful wines produced in Italy and much more

    If you wuold like to learn more about the book and pignolo here are some links
    https://shop.themorningclaret.com/collections/books/products/pignolo-cultivating-the-invisible-by-ben-little
    https://www.wine-searcher.com/grape-1524-pignolo
    https://www.thenativegrapes.com

    As always remember the follow/subscribe to the Podcast and to tell your friends!

    • 41 min
    Riesling why is it a puzzle? how can we solve it with author Dr John Haeger

    Riesling why is it a puzzle? how can we solve it with author Dr John Haeger

    Loved by wine critics but a stranger to broad commercial appeal, Riesling is a light-skinned, aromatic grape of German origin which is also responsible for some of Germany's greatest, and longest-lived, wines. Riesling is made in a range of styles but generally produces crystalline, aromatic white wines with notes of citrus, wax and lanolin, with a light to medium body and plenty of fresh acidity.
    Although widely associated with the wines of the Mosel and Alsace, Riesling is planted all over the world and has established itself in the likes of Washington and Australia's Clare Valley.
    Riesling has also been stereotyped as just a sweet grape, used only to make sticky wines. But while botrytized Rieslings are among the finest sweet wines in the world, the majority of global Riesling wines are either dry or off-dry.
    Young dry Rieslings tend to be very light in colour, sometimes pushing into light gold hints, depending on the region and winemaking. Sweeter styles tend to be considerably more yellow/golden in hue.
    With today guest we discuss the conundrum that is Riesling, Dr John Haeger is the author of the book Riesling Rediscovered - Bold, Bright, and dry.
    Riesling come is many shapes and forms and each markets has is own preference to the style that is preferred, this makes it difficult to understand. With DR Haeger we speak about the key markets of Riesling and what is preferred and the regions that grow Riesling.
    We than discuss the factors that come to play to the early showing of petrol in the development of the wine
    And I question whether the German must weight is still relevant on a warming climate.
    Remember to hit the subscribe button and to tell your friends about the podcast!

    About the book
    https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520275454/riesling-rediscovered

    About the author
    https://wineeducationcouncil.org/teachers/john-w-haeger/

    more about riesling
    https://www.wine-searcher.com/grape-407-riesling

    Please consider Subscribing and to leave a review Mattia

    • 35 min
    The evolution of Chablis with author Rosemary George MW

    The evolution of Chablis with author Rosemary George MW

    Chablis has been one of the hardest wine regions to learn for me while studying for the WSET Diploma, in the blind tasting is my Achilles heel I never get it right!
    Well following my ideas of covering regions and topics that I found fascinating and hard while studying, this episode was bound to happen!

    Chablis is the name of a town and an appellation that lies in the valley of the River Serein in the northern-most part of Burgundy.

    110 kilometres northwest of Dijon, it has a slightly cooler climate than the Côte d’Or. It is well-known for wines made with the Chardonnay variety.

    In this episode, we speak to Rosemary George MW author of the book The Wines of Chablis. Chablis has experienced major swings in its popularity. In the early nineteenth century, it enjoyed a boom due to its relative proximity to Paris. Plantings in Chablis shrank under the challenges of phylloxera and powdery mildew in the nineteenth century and above all the building of the Paris-Lyons-Marseille railway in the middle of the nineteenth century.

    As Rosemary says Chablis region is not going through a revolution but an evolution.
    The rural depopulation after World War I and the devastating frost of 1945 reduced Chablis to a low point of just 500 ha. In more recent decades, demand has led to the land under the vine growing back to 5,500ha.

    The cool, northerly location means vineyards are susceptible to spring frosts. Which is the last 3 years have more than ever affected the vineyards reducing the production level.
    Chablis is a fascinating region that hides many unique challenges which are going to be explored in the episode. Remember to follow the podcast to know when new episodes are going to be released.

    As always remember to hit the follow button to have your inception of wine knowledge directly on your feed.

    If you would like to learn more about chablis here is the link of the book to Rosemary:
    https://www.infideas.com/books/wines-chablis/

    Other useful websites:
    https://www.chablis-wines.com/
    https://www.wine-searcher.com/regions-chablis
    https://winefolly.com/deep-dive/chablis-wine-guide/

    • 30 min
    Wines of Kent with Simpson Wine Estate - English wine scene Ep.5

    Wines of Kent with Simpson Wine Estate - English wine scene Ep.5

    The final episode on English wines is out now!
    We went to Kent to Visit Simpsons!

    https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/wines-of-kent-with-simpson-wine-estate-english-wine/id1525851408?i=1000557684410

    Kent is a county in southeast England and one of the leading areas for wine production in the UK. A range of still wines is made, predominantly whites from cool-climate German-developed crossings such as Ortega and Bacchus. However, as is the case for other parts of southern England, the county's traditional method of sparkling wines made from the Champagne grape varieties can often reach very high levels of quality.

    Simpson's Wine Estate is owned and run by husband and wife team Charles and Ruth Simpson. The Simpsons already own and run vineyards in France, they are now producing some top quality wines on the North Downs in Kent and have won numerous awards including a Platinum at the Decanter World Wine Awards for their Roman Road Chardonnay.

    Simpsons' Wine Estate is located in one of the sunniest corners of the British Isles, and they have further safeguarded their vines against extremes in climate by selecting sloping vineyards that face almost due south, ensuring heat accumulation during the day, and excellent cold air drainage at night. The maritime influence is also crucial to the success of their vines: they are less than eight miles from the coast on three sides, which helps insulate the fruit against intense variations in temperature.

    In December 2015, Champagne Taittinger announced it was buying a vineyard in Kent and would produce an English sparkling wine.

    There are around 50 vineyards. Kent is known colloquially as the Garden of England.
    The green-sand forms a thin strip around the Weald, a diamond-shaped area between the chalk ridges of the North and South Downs. Around two dozen Kent vineyards are situated within this area.

    Remember to hit the follow the podcast and as always if you have found listening to this podcast valuable, leave a review!

    https://simpsonswine.com/

    We would love you hear from you! Reach us on:
    Twitter Mattia Scarpazza

    • 36 min
    Oak use for Sparkling wines, Wiston Estate Sussex with Dermot Sugrue English wine scene Ep.4

    Oak use for Sparkling wines, Wiston Estate Sussex with Dermot Sugrue English wine scene Ep.4

    Sussex is classified as having a maritime climate and is one of the sunniest and warmest areas in England. Rainfall per annum is typically in the 650 to 850 range (25.5 to 33.5 inches). Projections regarding climate change have prompted optimistic suggestions that Sussex and neighboring areas may in a couple of decades supplant the ever-warming Champagne region as the world center of sparkling wine. Nevertheless, the climate throughout the south of England, remains marginal for still wine production, especially for red grape varieties.

    With the Wiston Head Winemaker Dermot Sugrue, we explore the sunny Sussex and we took much attention to the use of Oak in Sparkling wine production, both in aging and vinification.

    As you can see below England has some serious vintage variation, which implicates the quality and quantity of wines produced each season. At Wiston, Dermot has been working on a solera system in the tank for the liquor of tirage which give much character to the Sparkle.

    2008 – 24 tons
    2009 – 90 tons
    2010 – 150 tons
    2011 – 60 tons
    2012 – 11 tons (darkest, wettest and coldest summer since 1912)
    2013 – 186 tons
    2014 – 330 tons!
    That’s England for you!

    At the heart of the Wiston Estate story is the Goring family, led by Pip and Harry, who planted their first grapes in 2006 in the South Downs.

    With years of hard graft and challenges, the real deal clincher was the appointment of Dermot Sugrue as Head Winemaker, following a stint at Nyetimber. Dermot has since laid the foundations for much of modern English winemaking’s advancement. The Wiston winery, Dermot, and their clients have almost certainly won more medals, more trophies, and more acclaim than any other winery in England.

    The venue, Wiston House, is the centerpiece of the Wiston Estate – a true family affair that has been in the Goring family since 1743. Coincidentally, 1743 was also the year that Moët et Chandon was founded. Who would have thought back then that anyone would plant a vineyard in the heart of the Sussex countryside in 2006?

    The determination of Pip and her husband Harry, and the next generation of Kirsty and Richard, has been an inspirational and ethical driving force for the business. Read Hannah’s article Wiston Estate, A Family History, for a closer look into the Goring family story.


    Some other useful links on the topic
    https://www.wistonestate.com/?msclkid=53679b75b04e11ecbbcbc6201fcc7de5
    www.winegb.co.uk
    www.winegb.co.uk/home-visitors/classic-method/

    https://www.jancisrobinson.com/ocw/detail/england


    Reach us on
    Instagram lookingintowine
    Twitter Mattia Scarpazza
    Mail Info@mattiascarpazza.com

    • 41 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

Badgers Retreat ,

Paul Balke episode

Once again an informative and most interesting podcast - many thanks Mattia.

mrCAwine ,

Randall Graham

Insightful podcast. Well done! @mrCAwine

rulivia ,

Drink up every episode!

A great podcast for learning about wine and furthering your knowledge about a range of topics, including regions, producers, grapes and trends in the industry. Mattia has a real passion for his subject and a genuine interest in his guests and their knowledge, but he cleverly achieves a light-hearted tone, with each discussion feeling like a friendly chat at the dinner table.

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