1,387 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • News
    • 4.6 • 2.4K Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    Amazon and the Labor Shortage

    Amazon and the Labor Shortage

    Amazon is constantly hiring. Data has shown that the company has had a turnover rate of about 150 percent a year.

    For the founder, Jeff Bezos, worker retention was not important, and the company built systems that didn’t require skilled workers or extensive training — it could hire and lose people all of the time.

    Amazon has been able to replenish its work force, but the pandemic has exposed the vulnerabilities of this approach.

    We explore what the labor shortage has meant for Amazon and the people who work there.

    Guest: Karen Weise, a technology correspondent, based in Seattle for The New York Times.

    • 26 min
    What We Know About the Omicron Variant

    What We Know About the Omicron Variant

    The story of the Omicron variant began a week ago, when researchers in southern Africa detected a version of the coronavirus that carried 50 mutations.

    When scientists look at coronavirus mutations, they worry about three things: Is the new variant more contagious? Is it going to cause people to get sicker? And how will the vaccines work against it?

    We explore when we will get the answers to these three questions, and look at the discovery of the variant and the international response to it.

    Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a reporter covering science and global health for The New York Times.

    • 20 min
    A Prosecutor’s Winning Strategy in the Ahmaud Arbery Case

    A Prosecutor’s Winning Strategy in the Ahmaud Arbery Case

    This episode contains strong language.

    Heading into deliberations in the trial of the three white men in Georgia accused of chasing down and killing Ahmaud Arbery, an unarmed Black man, it was not clear which way the jurors were leaning.

    In the end, the mostly white jury found all three men guilty of murder. We look at the prosecution’s decision not to make race a central tenet of their case, and how the verdict was reached.

    Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta.

    • 37 min
    The Farmers Revolt in India

    The Farmers Revolt in India

    After a landslide re-election in 2019, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s control over India seemed impossible to challenge.

    But a yearlong farmers’ protest against agricultural overhauls has done just that, forcing the Indian prime minister to back down.

    How did the protesters succeed?

    Guest: Emily Schmall, a South Asia correspondent for The New York Times.

    • 28 min
    Righting the Historical Wrong of the Claiborne Highway

    Righting the Historical Wrong of the Claiborne Highway

    In the 1950s and ’60s, the Tremé neighborhood of New Orleans, one of the oldest African-American neighborhoods in the United States, was a vibrant community.

    But the construction of the Claiborne Expressway in the 1960s gutted the area.

    The Biden administration has said that the trillion-dollar infrastructure package will address such historical wrongs.

    How might that be achieved?

    Guest: Audra D.S. Burch, a national correspondent for The New York Times.

    • 25 min
    The Acquittal of Kyle Rittenhouse

    The Acquittal of Kyle Rittenhouse

    This episode contains strong language.

    On Aug. 25, 2020, Kyle Rittenhouse, a teenager, shot three men, two of them fatally, during street protests in Kenosha, Wis., over the shooting of a Black man by a white police officer.

    Mr. Rittenhouse’s trial, which began on Nov. 1, revolved around a central question: Did his actions constitute self-defense under Wisconsin law?

    Last week, a jury decided that they did, finding him not guilty on every count against him.

    We look at key moments from the trial and at how the verdict was reached.

    Guest: Julie Bosman, the Chicago bureau chief of The New York Times.

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
2.4K Ratings

2.4K Ratings

GSMarchal ,

Give Campbell a raise!!!

I love this show and have really enjoyed the two instalments on the PA school board. Wow, things are absolutely whack in the US. Please give Campbell a raise after having to sit with Paul Martino for his interview, that guy is the worst!!

urrgh hmm ,

Good podcast - Awful presenter

The host does his best to make an otherwise excellent podcast insufferable.

moa ici ,

ENOUGH WITH THE MUSIC PLS!

Some excellent reporting though often biased.
PLEASE STOP THE MELODRAMATIC MUSIC!!!! I really don’t need to be told how to feel about any story you are reporting, I can make up my mind. Don’t US citizens understand something unless there’s music attached to it?
Objective reporting should rely on the content, not on sentimental music...

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