729 episodes

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of the Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
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Nature Podcast Springer Nature Limited

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 161 Ratings

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of the Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    How do fish know where a sound comes from? Scientists have an answer

    How do fish know where a sound comes from? Scientists have an answer

    00:46 How light touches are sensed during sex150 years after they were discovered, researchers have identified how specific nerve-cell structures on the penis and clitoris are activated. While these structures, called Krause corpuscles, are similar to touch-activated corpuscles found on people’s fingers and hands, there was little known about how they work, or their role in sex. Working in mice, a team found that Krause corpuscles in both male and females were activated when exposed to low-frequency vibrations and caused sexual behaviours like erections. The researchers hope that this work could help uncover the neurological basis underlying certain sexual dysfunctions.
    News: Sensory secrets of penis and clitoris unlocked after more than 150 years
    Research article: Qi et al.
    News and Views: Sex organs sense vibrations through specialized touch neurons
    07:03 Research HighlightsAstronomers struggle to figure out the identity of a mysterious object called a MUBLO, and how CRISPR gene editing could make rice plants more water-efficient.
    Research Highlight: An object in space is emitting microwaves — and baffling scientists
    Research Highlight: CRISPR improves a crop that feeds billions
    09:21 How fish detect the source of soundIt’s long been understood that fish can identify the direction a sound came from, but working out how they do it is a question that’s had scientists stumped for years. Now using a specialist setup, a team of researchers have demonstrated that some fish can independently detect two components of a soundwave — pressure and particle motion — and combine this information to identify where a sound comes from.
    Research article: Veith et al.
    News and Views: Pressure and particle motion enable fish to sense the direction of sound
    D. cerebrum sounds: Schulze et al.
    20:30: Briefing ChatAncient DNA sequencing reveals secrets of ritual sacrifice at Chichén Itzá, and how AI helped identify the names that elephants use for each other.
    Nature News: Ancient DNA from Maya ruins tells story of ritual human sacrifices
    Nature News: Do elephants have names for each other?
    Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 31 min
    Hybrid working works: huge study reveals no drop in productivity

    Hybrid working works: huge study reveals no drop in productivity

    00:48 Short-haul spaceflight's effect on the human body.A comprehensive suite of biomedical data, collected during the first all-civilian spaceflight, is helping researchers unpick the effects that being in orbit has on the human body. Analysis of data collected from the crew of SpaceX’s Inspiration4 mission reveals that short duration spaceflight can result in physiological changes similar to those seen on longer spaceflights. These changes included things like alterations in immune-cell function and a lengthening of DNA telomeres, although the majority of these changes reverted soon after the crew landed.
    Collection: Space Omics and Medical Atlas (SOMA) across orbits
    12:13 Research HighlightsResearchers have discovered why 2019 was so awash with Painted Lady butterflies, and the meaning behind gigantic rock engravings along the Orinoco river.
    Research Highlight: A huge outbreak of butterflies hit three continents — here’s why
    Research Highlight: Mystery of huge ancient engravings of snakes solved at last
    14:55 The benefits of working from home, some of the timeA huge trial of hybrid working has shown that this approach can help companies retain employees without hurting productivity. While a mix of home and in-person working became the norm for many post-pandemic, the impacts of this approach on workers’ outputs remains hotly debated and difficult to test scientifically. To investigate the effects of hybrid working, researchers randomly selected 1,612 people at a company in China to work in the office either five days a week or three. In addition to the unchanged productivity, employees said that they value the days at home as much as a 10% pay rise. This led to an increase in staff retention and potential savings of millions of dollars for the company involved in the trial.
    Research article: Bloom et al.
    Editorial: The case for hybrid working is growing — employers should take note
    25:50: Briefing ChatGermany balks at the $17 billion bill for CERN’s new supercollider, and working out when large language models might run out of data to train on.
    Nature News: CERN’s $17-billion supercollider in question as top funder criticizes cost
    Associated Press: AI ‘gold rush’ for chatbot training data could run out of human-written text
    Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.
    Subscribe to Nature Briefing: AI and Robotics

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    • 38 min
    Twitter suspended 70,000 accounts after the Capitol riots and it curbed misinformation

    Twitter suspended 70,000 accounts after the Capitol riots and it curbed misinformation

    In this episode:
    00:46 Making a molecular Bose-Einstein condensateFor the first time, researchers have coaxed molecules into a bizarre form of matter called a Bose-Einstein condensate, in which they all act in a single gigantic quantum state. While condensates have been made using atoms for decades, the complex interactions of molecules have prevented them from being cooled into this state. Now, a team has successfully made a Bose-Einstein condensate using molecules made of caesium and sodium atoms, which they hope will allow them to answer more questions about the quantum world, and could potentially form the basis of a new kind of quantum computer.
    Research article: Bigagli et al.
    News: Physicists coax molecules into exotic quantum state — ending decades-long quest
    9:57 How deplatforming affects the spread of social media misinformationThe storming of the US Capitol on 6 January 2021 resulted in the social media platform Twitter (now X) rapidly deplatforming 70,000 users deemed to be sharers of misinformation. To evaluate the effect of this intervention, researchers analysed the activity of over 500,000 Twitter users, showing that it reduced the sharing of misinformation, both from the deplatformed users and from those who followed them. Results also suggest that other misinformation traffickers who were not deplatformed left Twitter following the intervention. Together these results show that social media platforms can curb misinformation sharing, although a greater understanding of the efficacy of these actions in different contexts is required.
    Research article: McCabe et al.
    Editorial: What we do — and don’t — know about how misinformation spreads online
    Comment: Misinformation poses a bigger threat to democracy than you might think
    20:14: Briefing ChatA new antibiotic that can kill harmful bacteria without damaging the gut microbiome, and the tiny plant with the world’s biggest genome.
    News: ‘Smart’ antibiotic can kill deadly bacteria while sparing the microbiome
    News: Biggest genome ever found belongs to this odd little plant
    Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 27 min
    How AI could improve robotics, the cockroach’s origins, and promethium spills its secrets

    How AI could improve robotics, the cockroach’s origins, and promethium spills its secrets

    In this episode:
    00:25 What the rise of AI language models means for robotsCompanies are melding artificial intelligence with robotics, in an effort to catapult both to new heights. They hope that by incorporating the algorithms that power chatbots it will give robots more common-sense knowledge and let them tackle a wide range of tasks. However, while impressive demonstrations of AI-powered robots exist, many researchers say there is a long road to actual deployment, and that safety and reliability need to be considered.
    News Feature: The AI revolution is coming to robots: how will it change them?

    16:09 How the cockroach became a ubiquitous pestGenetic research suggests that although the German cockroach (Blattella germanica) spread around the world from a population in Europe, its origins were actually in South Asia. By comparing genomes from cockroaches collected around the globe, a team could identify when and where different populations might have been established. They show that the insect pest likely began to spread east from South Asia around 390 years ago with the rise of European colonialism and the emergence of international trading companies, before hitching a ride into Europe and then spreading across the globe.
    Nature News: The origin of the cockroach: how a notorious pest conquered the world

    20:26: Rare element inserted into chemical 'complex' for the first timePromethium is one of the rarest and most mysterious elements in the periodic table. Now, some eight decades after its discovery, researchers have managed to bind this radioactive element to other molecules to make a chemical ‘complex’. This feat will allow chemists to learn more about the properties of promethium filling a long-standing gap in the textbooks.
    Nature News: Element from the periodic table’s far reaches coaxed into elusive compound
    Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.

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    • 23 min
    How mathematician Freeman Hrabowski opened doors for Black scientists

    How mathematician Freeman Hrabowski opened doors for Black scientists

    Growing up in Alabama in the 1960s, mathematician Freeman Hrabowski was moved to join the civil rights moment after hearing Martin Luther King Jr speak. Even as a child, he saw the desperate need to make change. He would go on to do just that — at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, where he co-founded the Meyerhoff Scholars Program, one of the leading pathways to success for Black students in STEM subjects in the United States.
    Freeman is the subject of the first in a new series of Q&As in Nature celebrating ‘Changemakers’ in science — individuals who fight racism and champion inclusion. He spoke to us about his about his life, work and legacy.
    Career Q&A: I had my white colleagues walk in a Black student’s shoes for a day

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    • 36 min
    Audio long read: How does ChatGPT ‘think’? Psychology and neuroscience crack open AI large language models

    Audio long read: How does ChatGPT ‘think’? Psychology and neuroscience crack open AI large language models

    AIs are often described as 'black boxes' with researchers unable to to figure out how they 'think'. To better understand these often inscrutable systems, some scientists are borrowing from psychology and neuroscience to design tools to reverse-engineer them, which they hope will lead to the design of safer, more efficient AIs.
    This is an audio version of our Feature: How does ChatGPT ‘think’? Psychology and neuroscience crack open AI large language models

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    • 17 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
161 Ratings

161 Ratings

Fabrizio.Alberti ,

Good way to get the latest scientific updates

Thank you for keeping the main podcast and the Coronavirus podcast separate!

Ali7B ,

Great mix of content

Good range of topics, sometimes wonderfully nerdy

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Too Many Ads

Content is OK and commercial podcasts need ads/money but over time this podcast has gone OTT on ads to the point where it’s a real nuisance, to the point where I’m about to give-up on it.

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