269 episodes

Regenerative Skills is based on the pursuit of a regenerative life. A lifestyle centered on stewardship of the natural world, strong connections to community, and the daily habits that bring us closer to those goals. Each week learn actionable information from experts around the world that you can apply in your own life. Together we can regenerate our planet and our communities.

Regenerative Skills Oliver Goshey

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 11 Ratings

Regenerative Skills is based on the pursuit of a regenerative life. A lifestyle centered on stewardship of the natural world, strong connections to community, and the daily habits that bring us closer to those goals. Each week learn actionable information from experts around the world that you can apply in your own life. Together we can regenerate our planet and our communities.

    Regeneration is for everyone! Stories from the Regenerative Skills community

    Regeneration is for everyone! Stories from the Regenerative Skills community

    Today I’m excited to share a special episode which comes from a presentation I gave about two weeks ago with Gaia Education, an leading organization in providing education in sustainable development.Through Ecosystem Restoration Camps, the NGO that I used to work with, I have co-facilitated the design portion of their Ecosystem Restoration Design course for the last few years.







    Now, for the first time they’ve made the course available for open rolling registration, which means you no longer have to wait for the bi-annual signup times and take the course within a 6 month window. In order to promote this they organized and online summit and I was invited to present on a topic that I’ve been passionate about for years and that is the core motivation behind this podcast, which is to spread the message that Regeneration is for everyone.







    So in this talk, which you can also find online in its unedited video form, which you can watch on the show notes for this episode on the website, I introduce some of the key concepts that differentiates the concept of regeneration from other paradigms of thought. To illustrate some of the myriad examples of regeneration in action I highlight 6 stories of amazing individuals that I’ve had the pleasure to interview on this show in the past, and that have inspired me in my work. At the end I wrap it up by outlining some of the design concepts and processes that I teach in the course to guide students through the creation of their own projects through the group activity.







    Though there is an important visual component of this presentation I know you’ll get all the essential information from the audio and I also highly encourage you to listen to the interviews from the past with each of the people that I highlight in the talk.







    And a quick reminder if you’re inspired by the concepts in this talk and the massive potential of designing through this process, I’ll be teaching a five day intensive in-person course on regenerative design between the 11th and the 16th of October at the beautiful Green Rebel farm in Miravet, Spain. We still have one or two spots available and you can find out all the details on the website or through our bio on instagram.







    Join the discord discussion channel to answer the weekly questions and learn new skills with the whole community







    Links:









    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JsSl3cZPyjM











    https://regenerativeskills.com/abundantedge-from-poverty-to-permaculture-and-beyond-with-luwayo-biswick-director-of-the-permaculture-paradise-institute-071/











    https://regenerativeskills.com/dani-baker-on-why-its-never-too-late-to-start-your-home-scale-forest-garden/











    https://regenerativeskills.com/invest-curate-mend-a-manifesto-for-our-clothing/











    https://regenerativeskills.com/abundantedge-sean-sherman/











    https://regenerativeskills.com/abundantedge-meredith-leigh/











    https://regenerativeskills.com/abundantedge-fighting-food-apartheid-and-empowering-people-of-color-to-get-back-to-the-land-with-leah-penniman-author-of-farming-while-black-091/









    https://www.programmes.gaiaeducation.uk/ecosystems-restoration

    • 40 min
    Elvira Di’Brigit on why we farm. Stories from growers of the Capay Valley

    Elvira Di’Brigit on why we farm. Stories from growers of the Capay Valley

    A lot of my work at the moment is centered around building community and connecting people across Europe who are on a journey into regenerative agriculture. As I learn more and more about the farmers that I’m working with and their challenges and desires for the future I’m struck by the stories that unfold. Stories of legacy, perseverance, experimentation, recovery from adversity, hope, and so much more. As I work to gather and record these stories and to connect these people so we can better collaborate and support one another, I’ve been drawn to reflect on some of the past episodes in this podcast that featured the unique stories of growers and land stewards.One of my favorite episodes that centered around telling the stories of farmers was with Elvira Di'Brigit, the author of the book “Why We Farm” which is an investigation into the whole truth about life as a modern day farmer. Viewed through the lens of the environment within the Capay Valley of northern California, each chapter features a different model of farming. In each profile, farmers share the stories behind their work and their lives on the farm; the business side of production, the personal challenges they face, and words of advice for the would-be-farmer. The book asks hard questions and gives a reverent yet realistic picture of a thriving local food system.In this interview from back in season 1 of this show, Elvira talks about how she first came to the Capay Valley and her motivations behind wanting to live a farming lifestyle. We talk about how the farmers profiled in her book tell a larger story of modern farming in the United States, and even the trends and challenges facing the agricultural industry around the world. Elvira also gives a unique perspective into the growing community outreach that is strengthening the bonds in the valley and fostering a larger network of resilience that should be inspiring for anyone living in a rural community.







    Join the discord discussion channel to answer the weekly questions and learn new skills with the whole community







    Links:







    Elvira on facebook







    http://whywefarmcapay.com/

    • 34 min
    Lynn Cassels on their journey to starting a successful farm with no prior experience

    Lynn Cassels on their journey to starting a successful farm with no prior experience

    It’s no secret that the farmer population in Europe and many other places has been diminishing and growing older for a long time now. There are however still lots of younger folks who are interested in becoming farmers, but are struggling to get their foot in the door. Barriers to entry such as high land prices, high startup and infrastructure costs, lack of loan options, bureaucratic difficulties in inheritance, and a steep learning curve if you don’t already have experience farming are holding a lot of us back. Despite these challenges there are some incredible stories of new farmers who are finding success and fulfillment on the land. They’re often the ones pioneering new business models and best practices in ecological management. 







    That’s why I reached out to Lynn Cassells, who along with her partner Sandra Baer own and operate Lynbreck Croft, an award winning farm in northwest Scotland. Lynbreck Croft is a 150 acre mixed land holding of everything from fields and woodlands, to hill ground and bog located in the Cairngorms National Park with the land ranging from 320m to 450m above sea level. 







    Like many new farmers, Lynbreck has a unique origin story. Lynn and Sandra first met while working as rangers for the National Trust in the UK and soon realized that they shared a dream of living closer to the land. They bought Lynbreck Croft back in March 2016 – which they describe as 150 acres of pure Scottishness – with no experience in farming but a huge passion for nature and the outdoors. They now raise heritage breeds of cattle and pigs, grow produce and have become a model farm in their region for ecological production practices.







    Lynn and Sandra also wrote an inspiring book all about their journey of moving onto the land and how they've developed their idea of the farmers they want to be and their involvement in their new community which you can find through Chelsea Green books. 







    In this discussion I speak with Lynn about the initial challenges they faced in finding land and learning to make a living from it. We talk about the steep learning curve and the resources they turned to to make it manageable. Lynn also tells me about the unique challenges they have in the notoriously harsh climate of northwestern Scotland and how they’ve made choices on the farm to mitigate these difficulties. 







    This discussion is full of insightful advice and learnings from a unique journey from two farming newcomers who’ve demonstrated that you can build a farm business from scratch in modern times. Be sure to listen to the end when Lynn gives valuable advice for other people who dream of starting their farm without any previous experience. 







    Join the discord discussion channel to answer the weekly questions and learn new skills with the whole community







    Links:







    https://www.lynbreckcroft.co.uk/ 







    https://www.chelseagreen.com/product/our-wild-farming-life/







    https://www.instagram.com/lynbreck_croft/







    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRJrQZN4-Boka2m88TKB-1w







    https://www.facebook.com/lynbreckcroft/

    • 1 hr 11 min
    Mateusz Ciasnocha on understanding the coming changes to the European common agriculture policy (CAP)

    Mateusz Ciasnocha on understanding the coming changes to the European common agriculture policy (CAP)

    Ever since moving to Europe three years ago, I’ve been working to understand both the differences and similarities between the cultural, societal, and governmental background that I’m more familiar with from the USA and Mesoamerica compared to Spain and the larger European Union. Especially since my work is centered around agriculture and how we can set up the infrastructure to assist growers on this continent who want to shift to regenerative management, I need to first gain an understanding of what has incentivised and built the system we currently have. One of the largest influences that governs and regulates how people all around the different parts of Europe farm and manage land is the Common Agriculture Policy, known as the CAP.







    In order to get a better understanding of the complex history and nuanced current reality of the CAP, I reached out to my friend and colleague in Climate Farmers, Mateusz Ciasnocha, our Policy & Industry Advocacy Lead in the company. In this episode, Mateusz explains a bit about the history of the CAP and how it’s been used to accomplish its stated goal of creating food security as well as its effect on the development of the agricultural sector in Europe in the past decades. He also helps me to understand how the different countries within the European Union work within the CAP as well as its differences in implementation in each member country. 







    From there we talk about how the CAP will be changing in this next 7 year cycle and how current events are creating controversy and challenges to the new rollout. Be sure to stick around until the end when Mateusz gives his own opinion on how the CAP can be leveraged in the future to facilitate a regenerative transformation of agriculture in this region as well.







    As a new resident in this continent, all of this information has been new to me and I’m also realizing the global implications of the European Common Agriculture Policy, so even if you don’t live in Europe, this is a good subject to build an understanding of because it may affect you more directly than you think. Also, please try and forgive my bumbling misunderstandings along the way in this interview. Terminology always trips me up.







    Join the discord discussion channel to answer the weekly questions and learn new skills with the whole community







    Links:









    https://www.climatefarmers.org/

    • 59 min
    Learnings and reflections from starting our own regenerative projects with Oliver, Nick, and Jacob

    Learnings and reflections from starting our own regenerative projects with Oliver, Nick, and Jacob

    This week I wanted to get back to one of my favorite formats from the early days of this show in which I just take the time to speak with some of my close friends and collaborators about what we’re working on. Today I grabbed my good friends Nick Steiner and Jacob Evans. 







    Nick is one of my closest colleagues in my work with Climate Farmers. He leads the Academy at the company and has spearheaded the coach matching service where we put farmers in touch with other farmers and experts who can help them in their transition to regenerative agriculture. He also recently invested in a property in Tenerife, the largest of the Canary Islands and has been renovating an off-grid homestead for the last several months. 







    Jacob is another close friend of mine and earlier this year we taught an introductory course on syntropic agroforestry at the Green Rebel farm in Miravet, Spain. Jacob has been teaching syntropic agroforestry for arid climates and managing the farm at Suryalila Yoga retreat center for the last few years. He is also in the early stages of a big transition as he moves his young family back to Argentina where his wife is from, and will be starting a small farm there later this year. He also has a lot of experience setting up and running food production systems in the challenging climate of southern Spain. 







    The reason why I called on these guys is because most of the clients that come to me and the students that join in my courses are working towards a big transition onto the land. Some are in the early stages of considering buying land and starting a farm. Others are actively looking for property, and some have already bought a place and are beginning the development process. As a result I get tons of questions about how to choose a property, what important things they should be looking for, what to prepare for and be aware of, how to avoid mistakes, etc. 







    I myself am in the process of working to move onto a property in the mountains of central Catalunya in Spain and am drawing from my own learning journey from the past when I began my first homestead with my colleagues in Guatemala almost 5 years ago. I know now that there are so many things I would do differently with more knowledge and hindsight. 







    Because of all this shared experience me and the other two guys have in common with making and preparing for this type of lifestyle transition I wanted to have an in depth chat about the most important learnings we gained from these experiences. We also talk a lot about what we’ll be drawing from in our new endeavors and the advice or guidance we would give our former selves based on what we’ve learned from so many mistakes and blunders. 







    It’s really interesting to me to understand the patterns and commonalities that come out even from the different circumstances and motivations that we’ve had and that I’ve heard from all my students and clients over the years. 







    If you like exploring this topic and want to hear more about it after this episode, I’ve posted the details of the upcoming instagram live session that I’ll be doing with Nick this weekend on Saturday evening. We’ll be answering listener questions about learnings and important considerations when looking for land in the country and the reality of making that kind of a lifestyle transition so be sure to check it out. We’d love to see you there. 







    With that out of the way, let’s get started with the first of what I hope will be a lot more regenerative roundtable sessions. 







    Join the discord discussion channel to win a copy of Coppice Agroforestry and learn new skills with the whole community

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Patrick Worms on the history and future of agroforestry

    Patrick Worms on the history and future of agroforestry

    I’ve been taking it easy since my sister and her little girls are over visiting from Kuwait for the month and my Granny on the Isle of Man was also able to stop by for a week. So for that reason I’m going to rebroadcast one of my favorite episodes on agroforestry from two seasons ago with Patrick Worms. I hope all of you out there are also finding time to unwind and enjoy this summer despite all the challenges and extremes we’re experiencing. 







    With regenerative agriculture and agroforestry increasingly becoming popular topics in environmental and even political circles. I wanted to do a one-on-one session with one of my favorite speakers in this sphere, Patrick Worms. 







    Many of you frequent listeners will remember him from the panel discussion on agroforestry two weeks ago that I hosted with Climate Farmers.







    I got to know Patrick’s work and perspective more intimately as part of the online course on ecosystem restoration design that we both teach on.







    Patrick is the Senior Science Policy Advisor at World Agroforestry, President of the European Agroforestry Federation, and trustee of the International Union of Agroforestry, he’s also a valued member of the advisory council with the Ecosystem Restoration Camps.







    In the courses and conversations I’ve seen with him, I’ve always been struck by the stories and compassionate understanding of the people that Patrick has met in his work and travels.







    In order to make some of these stories and insights available to you listeners, I let go of the usual focus just on actionable information to let this chat take its own course.







    Though we still cover a lot of practical advice in this talk, what I often take away from listening to Patrick is a renewed reverence for the individual people who are working to manage their lands and produce food around the world.







    It’s easy to think of agriculture and the food industry as these monoliths without faces, but the lives of the people who make up these systems, from those to tend the land all the way through the logistics, distribution, transportation, all the way to our kitchens are important to remember ad pay attention too as well. 







    To get us started off with some background though, Patrick shed some light on the history of agroforestry and it’s deep traditions in Europe specifically.







    Join the discord discussion channel to win a copy of Coppice Agroforestry and learn new skills with the whole community







    Links:







    https://www.worldagroforestry.org/







    https://www.cgiar.org/







    https://euraf.isa.utl.pt/welcome







    https://www.iufro.org/







    https://www.evergreening.org/







    https://ejpsoil.eu/

    • 32 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
11 Ratings

11 Ratings

DggManc ,

Challenge your thinking!

Think you know what farming is? This will open your eyes! Packed with inspiration while not avoiding big questions. Great panel, thank you.

tristanwhotravels ,

Top quality sustainability podcast

Great interviews

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