300 episodes

Investigating every aspect of the food we eat

The Food Programme BBC

    • Arts
    • 4.3 • 618 Ratings

Investigating every aspect of the food we eat

    The Joy of Heat

    The Joy of Heat

    The chilli revolution of the past decade has made the UK a nation of chilli-jam lovers, and windowsill spice-growers. But our desire for the fiery kick of heat-giving food goes back centuries. What is it about us that makes us crave the pain and pleasure of chilli, wasabi, and horseradish?

    In this programme Sheila Dillon investigates our love for the hot stuff, speaking to chefs, growers, and researchers who are taking heat to new, extravagant heights.

    Presented by Sheila Dillon
    Produced in Bristol by Melvin Rickarby

    • 29 min
    A Nominations Celebration

    A Nominations Celebration

    The BBC Food and Farming Awards are back for their 20th edition, ready to celebrate the people across the UK who are changing lives for the better, through food and drink.

    Marking the official opening of nominations, Sheila Dillon chats to this year's head judge, chef Angela Hartnett, about how the hospitality industry's coped over the past year - and the brand new awards categories up for grabs. Because although it's been a time of incredible stress and hardship for many in the industry, there have also been staggering displays of imagination, generosity and creativity; which is why this year's awards will focus on the people and businesses who’ve gone above and beyond during the pandemic.

    Nominations are open until just before midnight on Monday 17th May.

    For more information on how to nominate for the 2021 BBC Food and Farming Awards, visit: bbc.co.uk/foodawards


    Presented by Sheila Dillon; produced in Bristol by Lucy Taylor.

    • 29 min
    Lab-grown meat: How long before it's on a menu near you?

    Lab-grown meat: How long before it's on a menu near you?

    The first lab-grown beef burger was cooked and eaten in London in 2013. Since then more than 15 types of meat have been re-created by food scientists - including lamb, duck, lobster and even kangaroo. Last year, Singapore became the first country in the world to approve the sale of a cultured chicken nugget - so how far away are we in the UK from seeing cultured meat on the menu?

    The companies producing lab-grown meat say it is the answer to many of the world's problems; deforestation, factory farming, antibiotic resistance and carbon emissions. Sceptics say it is too expensive, highly-processed and any 'green' credentials have yet to be proven.

    In this programme, Sheila Dillon speaks to some of those at the forefront of developments, and asks if lab-grown meat is the fix the meat eating world has been asking for?

    Presented by Sheila Dillon
    Produced in Bristol by Natalie Donovan

    • 29 min
    The Urban Growing Revolution

    The Urban Growing Revolution

    Planting and growing food has had a massive boost during the pandemic - and that hasn't been limited to those with gardens.

    Right across the country, people have been making the most of balconies, rooftops, even window boxes to get their green-fingered fix, as increasing numbers of us enjoy the benefits of interacting with nature and having a hand in producing our own food.

    Hot on the heels of her own spring planting project, Leyla Kazim explores stories of food being grown in cities: from individuals re-purposing tiny outdoor spaces during lockdown; to community garden projects providing fresh food and mental health support; through to innovative urban farms offering ideas for our future food security.

    Leyla speaks to writer and YouTube gardening sensation Huw Richards; Dr Jill Edmondson from the University of Sheffield, who's collecting data on national growing habits; and a range of first-time growers who've been following her tutorials on social media.

    She also hears from Woodlands Community Garden in Glasgow, and the Grow Cardiff city growing project - and heads to Stockport rooftop garden The Landing with chef Sam Buckley from Where The Light Gets In and Jo Payne from Manchester Urban Diggers, to find out just how valuable a green space for growing food in the heart of a city can be...


    Presented by Leyla Kazim; produced in Bristol by Lucy Taylor.

    • 29 min
    The Magic of Mussels (And Their Troubled Trade)

    The Magic of Mussels (And Their Troubled Trade)

    Dan Saladino finds out how Brexit could wreck plans to turn the mussel into a mainstream food. They're good for our health and the environment so why are producers facing ruin?

    From their base in Lyme Bay in South Devon Nicki and John Holmyard grow mussels out at sea. Their pioneering farm, once completed, will be the largest of its kind in European waters, capable of producing ten thousand tonnes of mussels each year. Since January however, they haven't been able to harvest the shellfish which they mostly sell into to Europe. Following Brexit a dispute between the government and the EU has meant the export of much of the UK's live bivalve molluscs (oysters and cockles as well as mussels) has ground to a halt. Dan explains what lies behind this trade dispute and the devastating impact its having on the industry.

    Exports into the European Union are essential to mussel farmers in the UK because we eat so little of the shellfish we produce. So why do these bivalves matter? Mary Seddon, a mollusc expert, explains why this source of food was so important to our ancestors and also describes the environmental benefits mussels bring to our coastline.

    Belgian food writer Regula Ysewin (pictured) reveals why it was Belgium that fell in love with mussels and also provides a guide to cooking them.

    Produced and presented by Dan Saladino.

    • 28 min
    Food, James Bond’s food

    Food, James Bond’s food

    We don’t often see James Bond eating in the films, but in the novel food is almost as important as espionage, cocktails, sex, villains and travel. As many await the release of the new Bond film, we want to take your taste buds on a journey, to the flavours that were so unimaginably exotic when these books were written in the 1950s and 60s.

    Tom Jaine, former restaurateur and editor of The Good Food Guide, came of age when the Bond books were written. He remembers sneaking a copy of Casino Royale from his parents’ book group and being transported by it’s exoticism. The food was completely beyond the imagination for a post-war generation who were newly out of rationing.

    We meet Edward Biddulph, archaeologist by day, Bond enthusiast by night who has written Licence to Cook, in which he recreates the meals in the Bond books. Edward teaches Sheila how to make Bond’s most iconic dish - scrambled eggs.

    Biographer Andrew Lycett explains how the appetites of Ian Fleming made it into James Bond’s own tastes. And food journalist Clare Finney connect with the desire to be transported on a culinary adventure when the world around you is rather drab.

    Presenter: Sheila Dillon
    Producer: Emma Weatherill

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
618 Ratings

618 Ratings

sigmund47 ,

Great when

Sheila Dillon is at the helm. Sadly Dan doesn’t cut it for me. No bite and rather bland. I do hope he’s not limbering up to take over.

Psektuepr ,

Progressive propaganda

Same old BBC pushing the insane agenda. Avoid!

DansgoneDutch ,

Janet & John try Sound Design

A dour presenting style contrasted with ramped up sound design from an audio library of the ‘bleeding obvious’. Xmas edition particularly bad for this. Cheer up & cut the tunes - we know what Christmas sounds like.

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