55 episodes

The International Anthony Burgess Foundation Podcast explores the life and work of Anthony Burgess, most famous for writing A Clockwork Orange. We talk to writers, literature experts, and other people who met Burgess in various contexts. We also help illuminate Burgess's work through informative scripted episodes. The Burgess Foundation Podcast is also home to Ninety-Nine Novels, a series in which we explore Burgess's favourite fiction with writers and experts.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The International Anthony Burgess Foundation Podcast International Anthony Burgess Foundation

    • Arts
    • 4.9 • 14 Ratings

The International Anthony Burgess Foundation Podcast explores the life and work of Anthony Burgess, most famous for writing A Clockwork Orange. We talk to writers, literature experts, and other people who met Burgess in various contexts. We also help illuminate Burgess's work through informative scripted episodes. The Burgess Foundation Podcast is also home to Ninety-Nine Novels, a series in which we explore Burgess's favourite fiction with writers and experts.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Ninety-Nine Novels: Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell

    Ninety-Nine Novels: Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell

    In 1984, Anthony Burgess published Ninety-Nine Novels, a selection of his favourite novels in English since 1939. The list is typically idiosyncratic, and shows the breadth of Burgess's interest in fiction. This podcast, by the International Anthony Burgess Foundation, explores the novels on Burgess's list with the help of writers, critics and other special guests.
    In this episode writer and academic John Bowen guides Andrew Biswell of the Burgess Foundation through Nineteen-Eighty Four by George Orwell.
    Published in 1949, Nineteen-Eighty Four is one of the most revered pieces of dystopian fiction ever written. Telling the story of Winston Smith, an office drone who works for the Ministry of Truth, Orwell’s novel creates a terrifying vision of a totalitarian Britain.
    George Orwell was born as Eric Blair in 1903 in India. He is renowned for his political writing in the non-fiction books The Road to Wigan Pier and Down and Out in Paris and London. His novels include Animal Farm, Burmese Days and Keep the Aspidistra Flying. He died in 1950. 
    John Bowen is Professor of Nineteenth-Century Literature at the University of York. He is the author of Other Dickens: Pickwick to Chuzzlewit and has edited Anthony Trollope’s Barchester Towers and Phineas Redux for Oxford World’s Classics. He has contributed to a number of television documentaries and radio programmes, including BBC Radio 4's In Our Time, Front Row, Open Book, and Woman's Hour, Channel 4’s Dickens’s Secret Lover and BBC2’s Being the Brontes.
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    BOOKS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE
    By George Orwell:
    Burmese Days (1934)
    A Clergyman's Daughter (1935)
    Coming Up for Air (1939)
    Animal Farm (1945)
    By others:
    Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (1818)
    Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens (1839)
    A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens (1843)
    We by Yevgeny Zamyatin (1924)
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (1932)
    Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler (1940)
    Molloy by Samuel Beckett (1951)
    Malone Dies by Samuel Beckett (1951)
    The Unnameable by Samuel Beckett (1953)
    A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess (1962)
    Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys (1966)
    Troubles by J.G. Farrell (1970)
    G by John Berger (1972)
    The Siege of Krishnapur by J.G. Farrell (1973)
    Slow Days, Fast Company by Eve Babitz (1977)
    Offshore by Penelope Fitzgerald (1979)
    Good Behaviour by Molly Keane (1981)
    The Life and Times of Micheal K by J.M. Coetzee (1983)
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    LINKS
    Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell (edited by John Bowen) at Oxford University Press
    'Charles Dickens' by George Orwell at The Orwell Foundation
    International Anthony Burgess Foundation
    The theme music is Anthony Burgess’s Concerto for Flute, Strings and Piano in D Minor, and is performed by No Dice Collective.
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    If you have enjoyed this episode, don’t forget to leave us a review and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 51 min
    Ninety-Nine Novels: The Unlimited Dream Company by J.G. Ballard

    Ninety-Nine Novels: The Unlimited Dream Company by J.G. Ballard

    In 1984, Anthony Burgess published Ninety-Nine Novels, a selection of his favourite novels in English since 1939. The list is typically idiosyncratic, and shows the breadth of Burgess's interest in fiction. This podcast, by the International Anthony Burgess Foundation, explores the novels on Burgess's list with the help of writers, critics and other special guests.
    In this episode writer and academic David Ian Paddy guides the Burgess Foundation's Will Carr through the strange world of The Unlimited Dream Company by J.G. Ballard.
    Published in 1979, the novel begins with a man named Blake crashing a plane into the River Thames outside of Ballard’s hometown, the suburb of Shepperton. He soon finds he cannot leave the suburb, and manifests a series of extraordinary powers. But is his elevation to a kind of messiah reality, or did he really die in the plane crash?
    J.G. Ballard was born in Shanghai, where his father worked for a textile company. After internment during the war, the Ballard family moved to Britain in 1945. He published his first book, The Wind from Nowhere in 1961. He went on to publish 18 more novels along with several volumes of short stories, essays and an autobiography. He died in 2009.
    David Ian Paddy is the Albert Upton Endowed Chair in English Language and Literature at Whittier College in California. He specialises in twentieth century and contemporary British literature and has written extensively on writers such as J.G. Ballard, Angela Carter, Niall Griffiths, Jackie Kay and Jeff Noon. His book The Empires of J.G. Ballard: An Imaginitive Geography was published in 2015 by Gylphi Press.
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    BOOKS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE
    By J.G. Ballard:
    The Drowned World (1962)
    The Terminal Beach (1964)
    The Crystal World (1966)
    The Atrocity Exhibition (1970)
    Crash (1973)
    High Rise (1975)
    Hello America (1981)
    "The Intensive Care Unit" in Myths of the Near Future (1982)
    Empire of the Sun (1984)
    "Which Way to Inner Space?" in A User's Guide to the Millennium: Essays and Reviews (1996)
    By others:
    The Golden Bough by James George Frazer (1890)
    Ulysses by James Joyce (1922)
    Finnegans Wake by James Joyce (1939)
    Foundation by Isaac Asimov (1942)
    Pincher Martin by William Golding (1956)
    A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess (1962)
    The Wanting Seed by Anthony Burgess (1962)
    The Third Policeman by Flann O'Brien (1967)
    Ice by Anna Kavan (1967)
    MF by Anthony Burgess (1971)
    Napoleon Symphony by Anthony Burgess (1974)
    The End of the World News by Anthony Burgess (1982)
    Nights at the Circus by Angela Carter (1984)
    Puma by Anthony Burgess (2019)
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    LINKS
    The Empires of J.G. Ballard: An Imaginitive Geography by David Ian Paddy at Gylphi Press
    International Anthony Burgess Foundation
    The theme music is Anthony Burgess's Concerto for Flute, Strings and Piano in D Minor. It is performed by No Dice Collective.
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    If you have enjoyed this episode, why not leave us a review and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 54 min
    Ninety-Nine Novels: Goldfinger by Ian Fleming

    Ninety-Nine Novels: Goldfinger by Ian Fleming

    In 1984, Anthony Burgess published Ninety-Nine Novels, a selection of his favourite novels in English since 1939. The list is typically idiosyncratic, and shows the breadth of Burgess's interest in fiction. This podcast, by the International Anthony Burgess Foundation, explores the novels on Burgess's list with the help of writers, critics and other special guests.
    In this episode, the Burgess Foundation's Graham Foster talks to novelist Kim Sherwood about Goldfinger by Ian Fleming, the seventh novel in the James Bond series.
    Published in 1959, it follows James Bond as he investigates the activities of the villainous Auric Goldfinger, a man obsessed with wealth and determined to steal the gold reserves of the United States. In his review in Ninety-Nine Novels, Burgess declared that Fleming's writing 'raised the standard of the popular story’, and he argued against the notion that Fleming was not a literary writer.
    Ian Fleming was born in 1908, and worked as a journalist before the Second World War, during which he served in the Naval Intelligence Division, a posting which directly inspired the creation of James Bond. He wrote all of the Bond stories at his house, Goldeneye, in Jamaica, and while the spy thrillers dominated his writing career, he also wrote Chitty-Chitty Bang Bang. He died in 1964 at the age of 56.  
    Kim Sherwood is a novelist and lecturer in Creative Writing at the University of Edinburgh. She published her first novel, Testament, in 2018 and was shortlisted for the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award the following year. Her latest novel is Double or Nothing, the first in a new trilogy which follows a group of Double O agents as they search for a missing James Bond, is available now from HarperCollins.
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    BOOKS MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE
    By Ian Fleming:
    From Russia, with Love (1957)
    'Risico' in For Your Eyes Only (1960)
    On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1963)
    Thrilling Cities (1963)
    By others:
    Right Ho, Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse (1934)
    Venetia by Georgette Heyer (1958)
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    LINKS:
    Double or Nothing by Kim Sherwood at HarperCollins
    Kim Sherwood on Twitter
    Kim Sherwood on Instagram
    Ian Fleming Website
    International Anthony Burgess Foundation
    The theme music is Anthony Burgess's Concerto for Flute, Strings and Piano in D Minor. It is performed by No Dice Collective.
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    You can join the conversation and tell us which 100th book you would add to Burgess's list by using the hashtag #99Novels on Twitter.
    If you have enjoyed this episode, why not leave us a review and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 45 min
    Jesus Christ in Fiction

    Jesus Christ in Fiction

    In this episode, Andrew Biswell of the Burgess Foundation explores fictional representations of Jesus Christ with writer Nicholas Graham, author of The Judas Case.
    We begin with Anthony Burgess’s 1979 novel, Man of Nazareth, an ambitious account of Jesus’s life from the point of view of a fictional Greek merchant. The novel was written at the same time as Burgess’s teleplay Jesus of Nazareth which was filmed by Franco Zeffirelli with Robert Powell in the lead role.
    Nicholas Graham also introduces his own book, The Judas Case. Retired spymaster Solomon Eliades is called back into service to investigate the death of Yehuda of Kerioth, better known as Judas Iscariot, the most able undercover agent the Temple guard ever produced.
    Nicholas Graham studied creative writing at Manchester Metropolitan University. He was a member of the Sidney Sussex College Cambridge University team that won BBC2’s University Challenge – Champions Reunited series. An early draft of The Judas Case won a 2016 Northern Writers Awards New Fiction Bursary. Nicholas lives with his partner in a remote coastal village in Cumbria.
    LINKS
    Nicholas Graham on Twitter
    The Judas Case Blog
    The Judas Case by Nicholas Graham at The Book Guild
    International Anthony Burgess Foundation
    If you have enjoyed this episode, don’t forget to leave us a review and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 43 min
    Ninety-Nine Novels: Series Two Trailer

    Ninety-Nine Novels: Series Two Trailer

    Ninety-Nine Novels, Series 2, releases weekly from the 7 September 2022. 
    This series, we’ll be travelling to alternate universes and dystopian futures, exploring history and legend, and setting sail for exotic locations such as Miami, Cuba and Jerusalem. Along the way, we’ll meet a second world war flight crew, a terrifying dictator, a variety of priests, wizards and knights, and, of course, a world-famous super-spy. We’ll be guided on this journey by experts, who illuminate each of the novels and their authors.
    Ninety-Nine Novels is a podcast by the International Anthony Burgess Foundation, and is for anyone interested in the greatest novels of the last century, and anyone keen to discover hidden gems.
    Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 1 min
    The Literary Life of World War II

    The Literary Life of World War II

    In this episode we’re looking at the state of Literary London during the Second World War with writer Will Loxley.
    Will’s book Writing in the Dark: Bloomsbury, the Blitz and Horizon Magazine, brings to life the cultural and intellectual environment that influenced some of Anthony Burgess’s most defining thoughts about writing and literature. Many of the writers that feature in this story, such as Stephen Spender, George Orwell, Dylan Thomas and Evelyn Waugh, had the development of their creative lives arrested by the war. This was the same fate as Burgess, who felt he had been exiled to a military post in Gibraltar. But all of these writers tried to make sense of the war through literature and what they produced remains some of the most important work of the twentieth century.
    Will Loxley is a writer based in Sheffield. Writing in the Dark is his first book and was called ‘energetic and enthused’ by the Times. He is currently working on his second book, A Novel Idea: The Race to Master the English Novel from Daniel Defoe to Jane Austen. 
    Will can be found on Twitter @WillLoxley
    Writing in the Dark is published by Weidenfeld & Nicholson and is now available in paperback from your favourite place to buy books.
    For more about Anthony Burgess and to find out how you can support the work of the Burgess Foundation, visit our website.
    If you have enjoyed this episode, why not leave us a review and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.


    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 42 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
14 Ratings

14 Ratings

iluvstarkey ,

The music of AB

Fascinating episode. Can you provide links to where we might find performances or recordings?

MaryH1nge ,

Fixed

Needed Burgess fix.

Got it.

Gimme more.

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