100 episodes

What types of organisation, institution and industries are performing work that tests human resilience and evokes powerful feelings of shame, sadness, fear and disgust? Does working with people who commit serious crimes like rape and murder affect the staff who work with them? How do you overcome adversity and protect yourself from burnout or compassion fatigue?


Naomi Murphy and David Jones have decades of experience of working in prisons and other forensic settings. They host experts across a range of disciplines to discover what are some of the challenges that make a difference in fostering resilience and creativity in those who live and work in challenging organisations

The Locked up Living Podcast: Surviving and thriving in prisons and other challenging environments Podcasters David Jones & Dr Naomi Murphy

    • True Crime
    • 3.8 • 12 Ratings

What types of organisation, institution and industries are performing work that tests human resilience and evokes powerful feelings of shame, sadness, fear and disgust? Does working with people who commit serious crimes like rape and murder affect the staff who work with them? How do you overcome adversity and protect yourself from burnout or compassion fatigue?


Naomi Murphy and David Jones have decades of experience of working in prisons and other forensic settings. They host experts across a range of disciplines to discover what are some of the challenges that make a difference in fostering resilience and creativity in those who live and work in challenging organisations

    Michiel van Vreeswijk. Audio. The Complexity of the Internal World: The Role of Schemas and the Importance of Emotion in Psychotherapy

    Michiel van Vreeswijk. Audio. The Complexity of the Internal World: The Role of Schemas and the Importance of Emotion in Psychotherapy

    Michiel is a psychotherapist, psychologist and author who has written widely about Schema therapy. In this wide ranging conversation we discuss the importance of authenticity and emotion in therapeutic work. Here are five key points;
    1. Peer supervision in therapy can sometimes focus too much on providing advice and techniques, rather than creating a space for therapists to share their vulnerabilities and connect authentically.
    2. Many training programs in therapy emphasize techniques and attitudes, rather than teaching therapists how to connect with their own emotions and share them with clients. 3. The use of schemas and modes in therapy can become overly complex, with therapists feeling the need to label every aspect of a client's internal world. This can detract from the understanding of the complexity and individuality of each person's experiences.
    4. Group therapy elements should be given more attention in research and practice, as they provide a mini society where individuals can explore and learn from the differences and dynamics within the group.
    5. Therapists need to prioritize self-care and listen to their own minds and bodies. This includes recognizing signs of detachment, cynicism, and loss of interest, and taking them seriously to prevent burnout.
     
    Michiel van Vreeswijk, MSc is clinical psychologist and CEO of G-Kracht Mental Health Care Institute, The Netherlands. He is a certified supervisor and personal therapist in cognitive behavioral therapy (VGCt; Dutch CBT society), certified supervisor schematherapy individual and group schema therapy (ISST, Dutch society of ST) and specialist group therapy (Dutch society of group psychotherapie: NVGP). Michiel  gives regularly schema therapy workshops/supervision/ personal therapy in the Netherlands and worldwide. He is (co-) author/ editor of several schema books/ chapters/ articles and is a researcher in schema group therapy.

    • 48 min
    • video
    Michiel van Vreeswijk. Video. The Complexity of the Internal World: The Role of Schemas and the Importance of Emotion in Psychotherapy

    Michiel van Vreeswijk. Video. The Complexity of the Internal World: The Role of Schemas and the Importance of Emotion in Psychotherapy

    Michiel is a psychotherapist, psychologist and author who has written widely about Schema therapy. In this wide ranging conversation we discuss the importance of authenticity and emotion in therapeutic work. Here are five key points;
    1. Peer supervision in therapy can sometimes focus too much on providing advice and techniques, rather than creating a space for therapists to share their vulnerabilities and connect authentically.
    2. Many training programs in therapy emphasize techniques and attitudes, rather than teaching therapists how to connect with their own emotions and share them with clients. 3. The use of schemas and modes in therapy can become overly complex, with therapists feeling the need to label every aspect of a client's internal world. This can detract from the understanding of the complexity and individuality of each person's experiences.
    4. Group therapy elements should be given more attention in research and practice, as they provide a mini society where individuals can explore and learn from the differences and dynamics within the group.
    5. Therapists need to prioritize self-care and listen to their own minds and bodies. This includes recognizing signs of detachment, cynicism, and loss of interest, and taking them seriously to prevent burnout.
     
    Michiel van Vreeswijk, MSc is clinical psychologist and CEO of G-Kracht Mental Health Care Institute, The Netherlands. He is a certified supervisor and personal therapist in cognitive behavioral therapy (VGCt; Dutch CBT society), certified supervisor schematherapy individual and group schema therapy (ISST, Dutch society of ST) and specialist group therapy (Dutch society of group psychotherapie: NVGP). Michiel  gives regularly schema therapy workshops/supervision/ personal therapy in the Netherlands and worldwide. He is (co-) author/ editor of several schema books/ chapters/ articles and is a researcher in schema group therapy.

    • 48 min
    David Breakspear; From Prison to Purpose: Creating Meaningful Lives After Incarceration

    David Breakspear; From Prison to Purpose: Creating Meaningful Lives After Incarceration

    In this conversation, David Breakspear, a former prisoner and now a mentor and advocate for criminal justice reform, shares his insights and experiences with David and Naomi. David emphasizes the importance of listening and asking the right questions when working with individuals who have been through the criminal justice system. He believes that by shifting the focus from "what's wrong with you" to "what's happened to you," we can help people overcome their resentment and find a better path in life. David also discusses his involvement with organizations like Revolving Doors and Shannon Trust, where he uses his lived experience to support others. He highlights the power of language and the need for the system to use the right kind of language when addressing individuals who have been in prison. The conversation touches on the disruptive nature of custodial sentences and the challenges faced by individuals reintegrating into society. David shares his journey of turning his negative experiences into something purposeful and meaningful. He also talks about his involvement with Reconnect, a program that aims to support individuals transitioning from prison to the community. Throughout the conversation, David emphasizes the importance of speaking truth to power and advocating for change in the criminal justice system. He discusses the impact of neurodiversity and the need for support and understanding for individuals with diverse needs in prison. Overall, the conversation provides a powerful and thought-provoking perspective on the criminal justice system and the importance of empathy, understanding, and support in helping individuals overcome their past and build a better future.
    Main Points
    1. Living in probation hostels or approved premises can be challenging due to the mix of residents with different criminal backgrounds and the restrictions placed on individuals. It can feel like being stuck in a confined space where all daily activities take place.
    2. The age of criminal responsibility in Europe is the lowest at 10 years old, and children are often criminalized too young. The focus should be on addressing the underlying needs of young people, particularly in the school-to-prison pipeline and school exclusions.
    3. Mentoring and support play a crucial role in helping individuals overcome resentment and navigate through difficult situations. Listening and asking the right questions can help individuals see their potential and find alternative paths.
    4. The criminal justice system should prioritize meeting the health needs of individuals, regardless of their offenses. Providing support and addressing unmet needs can reduce the likelihood of reoffending.
    5. Personal experiences and the support of organizations like ReConnect have shown the importance of addressing health needs and providing opportunities for individuals to turn their lives around. Early intervention and support can prevent individuals from getting caught in the cycle of the criminal justice system.
     

    • 1 hr 9 min
    • video
    David Breakspear; From Prison to Purpose: Creating Meaningful Lives After Incarceration. Video version

    David Breakspear; From Prison to Purpose: Creating Meaningful Lives After Incarceration. Video version

    In this conversation, David Breakspear, a former prisoner and now a mentor and advocate for criminal justice reform, shares his insights and experiences with David and Naomi. David emphasizes the importance of listening and asking the right questions when working with individuals who have been through the criminal justice system. He believes that by shifting the focus from "what's wrong with you" to "what's happened to you," we can help people overcome their resentment and find a better path in life. David also discusses his involvement with organizations like Revolving Doors and Shannon Trust, where he uses his lived experience to support others. He highlights the power of language and the need for the system to use the right kind of language when addressing individuals who have been in prison. The conversation touches on the disruptive nature of custodial sentences and the challenges faced by individuals reintegrating into society. David shares his journey of turning his negative experiences into something purposeful and meaningful. He also talks about his involvement with Reconnect, a program that aims to support individuals transitioning from prison to the community. Throughout the conversation, David emphasizes the importance of speaking truth to power and advocating for change in the criminal justice system. He discusses the impact of neurodiversity and the need for support and understanding for individuals with diverse needs in prison. Overall, the conversation provides a powerful and thought-provoking perspective on the criminal justice system and the importance of empathy, understanding, and support in helping individuals overcome their past and build a better future.
    Main Points
    1. Living in probation hostels or approved premises can be challenging due to the mix of residents with different criminal backgrounds and the restrictions placed on individuals. It can feel like being stuck in a confined space where all daily activities take place.
    2. The age of criminal responsibility in Europe is the lowest at 10 years old, and children are often criminalized too young. The focus should be on addressing the underlying needs of young people, particularly in the school-to-prison pipeline and school exclusions.
    3. Mentoring and support play a crucial role in helping individuals overcome resentment and navigate through difficult situations. Listening and asking the right questions can help individuals see their potential and find alternative paths.
    4. The criminal justice system should prioritize meeting the health needs of individuals, regardless of their offenses. Providing support and addressing unmet needs can reduce the likelihood of reoffending.
    5. Personal experiences and the support of organizations like ReConnect have shown the importance of addressing health needs and providing opportunities for individuals to turn their lives around. Early intervention and support can prevent individuals from getting caught in the cycle of the criminal justice system.
     

    • 1 hr 9 min
    • video
    Greg Clarke; Exploring the Intersection of Psychology and Sports. Video version

    Greg Clarke; Exploring the Intersection of Psychology and Sports. Video version

    In this episode we interview Dr. Greg Clarke, a clinical psychologist with a diverse background in various roles. Dr. Clarke has worked as a clinical lead for a chronic pain service, a consultant psychologist, and head of psychology within a low secure rehab service. He has also worked as a lead clinical performance psychologist at a Premier League football club. During the conversation, Dr. Clarke discusses his experiences working in the field of clinical psychology and sports psychology. He shares insights into the challenges and rewards of working in these areas, highlighting the importance of maintaining a balance between personal and professional life. Dr. Clarke also discusses the temporary nature of the sports industry and the impact it can have on individuals' mental health. He emphasizes the significance of acceptance and the ability to overcome psychological pain, drawing on his experiences working with patients in pain services. Dr. Clarke also touches on the role of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), and eye movement desensitization reprocessing (EMDR) in his practice. Overall, the conversation provides valuable insights into the field of clinical psychology and the intersection of psychology and sports. Dr. Clarke's experiences shed light on the challenges and rewards of working in these areas and the importance of maintaining a balanced approach to life and work.

    • 56 min
    Greg Clarke; Exploring the Intersection of Psychology and Sports

    Greg Clarke; Exploring the Intersection of Psychology and Sports

    In this episode of the Locked Up Living podcast,we interview Dr. Greg Clarke, a clinical psychologist with a diverse background in various roles. Dr. Clarke has worked as a clinical lead for a chronic pain service, a consultant psychologist, and head of psychology within a low secure rehab service. He has also worked as a lead clinical performance psychologist at a Premier League football club. During the conversation, Dr. Clarke discusses his experiences working in the field of clinical psychology and sports psychology. He shares insights into the challenges and rewards of working in these areas, highlighting the importance of maintaining a balance between personal and professional life. Dr. Clarke also discusses the temporary nature of the sports industry and the impact it can have on individuals' mental health. He emphasizes the significance of acceptance and the ability to overcome psychological pain, drawing on his experiences working with patients in pain services. Dr. Clarke also touches on the role of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), and eye movement desensitization reprocessing (EMDR) in his practice. Overall, the conversation provides valuable insights into the field of clinical psychology and the intersection of psychology and sports. Dr. Clarke's experiences shed light on the challenges and rewards of working in these areas and the importance of maintaining a balanced approach to life and work.

    • 56 min

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

lovealways# ,

Zac podcasts

Not sure I agree with the way your reflecting your version of facts but why would you your angry and wrapped up in victim blaming The children do not come last The court system is tough But there is a percentage of men who do suffer and are indeed good enough as father BUT their are abusive fathers so don’t ignore the actual damage that takes place Your anger is noted in this podcasts but maybe you need to explore deeper in therapy Owning your shaming accepting your role and committing to change requires in depth work Have you truly worked this through ? You set up practice on theme that is about you and your scars are you ready to move on? Or are you reenacting your matter I get your a psychotherapist’s BUT the wounds are far from healed

Tomz2012 ,

Tedious, solipsistic and incoherent

Adman and Scanlon are unable to answer a question and incapable of completing a sentence without two or three ‘ummms’.

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