126 episodes

Presenter Ian Parkinson and executive editor Ian Cleverly chat to an array of special guests from road racing’s great champions to WorldTour royalty, industry figures, leading photographers and race organisers.

In between putting the cycling world to rights and thoughtful discussion of the sport’s talking points, there are competitions and chat about the best bits of the latest award-winning magazine.

The Rouleur Podcast Rouleur Magazine

    • Wilderness
    • 4.5 • 90 Ratings

Presenter Ian Parkinson and executive editor Ian Cleverly chat to an array of special guests from road racing’s great champions to WorldTour royalty, industry figures, leading photographers and race organisers.

In between putting the cycling world to rights and thoughtful discussion of the sport’s talking points, there are competitions and chat about the best bits of the latest award-winning magazine.

    Rouleur Conversations: Qhubeka-Assos and #Rouleur100

    Rouleur Conversations: Qhubeka-Assos and #Rouleur100

    The future of NTT, formerly MTN-Qhubeka, looked to be in doubt until team principal Doug Ryder announced Assos have stepped up their involvement to keep the team at the races in 2021.

    Ryder tells Ian Parkinson how Africa’s Team will keep working on getting homegrown riders from the continent into the top tier of the sport, and the big change in personnel for next season. Qhubeka means “move forward” – an apt slogan in these challenging times.

    Derek Bouchard-Hall, CEO of Assos, joins us to explain the renowned Swiss clothing company’s decision to stick with Ryder and the team and put the Qhubeka name front and centre of the project.

    Our big birthday issue 100 has just gone to the printers and it’s fair to say we are overjoyed with the result. Miles Baker-Clarke takes you through what’s hot in the Rouleur shop in the run up to Christmas, while Ian Cleverly points out a few highlights from this special issue.

    Plus news of upcoming competition prizes related to our 100 Memorable Moments feature. Get involved with the hashtag #rouleur100
     
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    • 27 min
    The Rouleur Longreads Podcast: Campagnolo's Mister Ghibli

    The Rouleur Longreads Podcast: Campagnolo's Mister Ghibli

    Tucked away in a warren of testing cub­icles and curious contraptions, we find Franco Rigolon hard at work. His job involves making just one thing, and it’s not something he can make very quickly. Franco is a wheel-builder, the sole person in charge — the only one with the know-how — of one of the company’s most enduring products: the Ghibli wheel.


    After Valentino Campagnolo took over following the death of his father in 1983, the Ghibli was one of his first great successes. In a time where almost every wheel was made the same way it had been since before the company’s beginning, Campagnolo put a team of engineers to work on coming up with some new ideas.


    From there came the concept of using fibres rather than spokes to create the tension and maintain structure. This was lighter, stronger, resistant to temperature changes and allowed more aerodynamic shapes.


    It was, to use an old cliché, a game changer.


    From Miguel Indurain’s hour record to Alex Zanardi’s Paralympic gold, the Campagnolo Ghibli has been a winning set of wheels. Meet the man who makes these labour intensive works of art.


    The Rouleur Longreads Podcast brings you selected long form articles from the magazine, especially recorded for Rouleur. Don’t stop what you’re doing – do it while listening to the world’s best cycling writing.


    The latest in this series is ‘Mister Ghibli’ by Colin O'Brien, from Rouleur 50, read by George Oliver.
     
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    • 20 min
    Rouleur Conversations: Ian Stannard, Jenson Button and Becky Hair

    Rouleur Conversations: Ian Stannard, Jenson Button and Becky Hair

    Racing drivers are partial to a bit of bike riding to keep them fit, but 2009 Formula One world champion Jenson Button has taken it a step further following years of high speed success behind the wheel, launching his own clothing range, Léger. Jenson talks to Ian Parkinson from his home in LA on being fit at 40 and designing kit that won't make Mrs B laugh...
    Rheumatoid arthritis has put a premature end to the fine career of Ian Stannard. The former British champion has been a highly respected and fondly regarded Classics mainstay of Team Sky since its inception. A Paris-Roubaix podium finish in 2016 and consecutive victories at Omloop Het Nieuwsblad are amongst Stannard's highlights - the second an unforgettable moment in hardman finishing after seeing off the combined efforts of three of the best Quick Steps, including Tom Boonen. Peter Stuart talks to the retiring Mr Stannard at home in Cheshire.
    And hill climber Becky Hair tells Ian Parkinson about her campaign for equal treatment of women from the bottom to the top of the sport. The hashtag #climbinghighertogether is going places. Hup, hup, listen up.
     
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    • 24 min
    The Rouleur Longreads Podcast: Tom Dumoulin and the Butterfly Effect

    The Rouleur Longreads Podcast: Tom Dumoulin and the Butterfly Effect

    It is late summer 2015 and nobody knows that Tom Dumoulin is on the verge of a breakthrough. Not the 24 year-old Dutchman himself, nor his team-mates at Giant-Alpecin. It doesn’t figure in his employers’ plans. The top tens of Grand Tour contenders put out by magazines and websites ahead of such races do not feature him. The best three-week riders in the world might know his name but have no idea he is set to join their ranks.
     
    Dumoulin has shown promise in week-long races, winning stages at the Tour de Suisse and the Eneco Tour, placing twice overall in successive years at both. He finished second to Tony Martin in the penultimate stage TT at last year’s Tour de France. By more than a minute but still, Tony Martin. A podium at Paris-Nice, maybe Romandie, should be next, though Dumoulin has already said his target for 2016 is an Olympic medal. A gold one.
     
    He is thought of by his team as an exciting prospect for the future but they see him, for now at least, as “a world class time trialist who’s very good on the hills”. He can make it over the high mountains (more or less) but he is not expected to challenge in them.
     
    That is about to change.


    He’s one of the best Grand Tour men of a generation now; in 2015, Tom Dumoulin was a 1,000-1 outsider before the Vuelta a España that kickstarted his career. The “Butterfly of Maastricht” and his team-mates reflect on how they nearly pulled off the greatest shock in modern Grand Tour racing.


    The Rouleur Longreads Podcast brings you selected long form articles from the magazine, especially recorded for Rouleur. Don’t stop what you’re doing – do it while listening to the world’s best cycling writing.


    The latest in this series is ‘The Butterfly Effect’ by Nick Christian, from Rouleur 18.6, read by George Oliver. Download the Rouleur app and use the code BUTTERFLY to read the whole issue free of charge.
     
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    • 24 min
    Rouleur Conversations: Elinor Barker and Katie Archibald, and Chris Jones on being black in Baltimore

    Rouleur Conversations: Elinor Barker and Katie Archibald, and Chris Jones on being black in Baltimore

    We have three fascinating, erudite guests on the latest podcast, and Desire editor Stuart Clapp too. Only joshing, Stu…
    Olympic team pursuiters Elinor Barker and Katie Archibald were interviewed by Hannah Dines for the latest Rouleur issue, and an excellent feature it is too. Waiting for a postponed Olympics, getting back to racing, mental health and explaining the Madison via the works of Shakespeare - Katie and Elinor cover it all in typically engaging style.
    Baltimore cyclist Chris Jones’s superb essay in issue 20.7 is another highlight. He tells Ian Parkinson about the experience of riding the city streets as a black man in America, racial divides, very gradual improvement and freeing the mind via the bike. Essential listening.
    Our Stu was understandably emotional at the weekend, as a young man from Hackney most of us here at Rouleur Towers have known since he was a skinny little kid working in a bike shop, won the Giro d’Italia. Stuart has a nice little anecdote about Tao Geoghegan Hart and what a decent chap he is - of course he does. Brings a tear to the eye.
     
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    • 36 min
    The Rouleur Longreads Podcast: The Wout Factor from Rouleur 20.7

    The Rouleur Longreads Podcast: The Wout Factor from Rouleur 20.7

    “The ’cross background puts riders like Wout and Mathieu in an ideal position to fight for the win in the final of a Classic. They’re used to pushing top end power for an hour in a way most riders can’t,” says Merijn. “Explosive power is harder to develop than endurance. It’s also a mental thing: if you’ve learned to push yourself at a young age, it’s something that sticks with you. It’s very hard to pick up later if you haven’t got it.” 


    Some say cyclo-cross riders also have a better feel for the race. “You learn that riding ’cross – bike handling, positioning, timing,” says Wout. And with the constant micro-adjustments and anticipation, riders get better at gauging their effort, sensing when to push or hold back. “The racing is more instinctive, not just relying on power readings,” he says.


    One of the added challenges in the winter discipline has been the increasingly technical courses. “It’s great for the spectators, but shifts the racing more towards interval efforts, less steady state,” says Wout. “I’m more of a power rider and this recent development tends to favour lighter, more technical riders like Mathieu.” Of course, Wout has amazing skills, but Mathieu is nimbler. “It means usually having to chase him coming out of the bends.”


    Having Van der Poel as a rival meant there was never any room for complacency. In interviews, Wout’s trainer Marc Lamberts has said that it led to him forcing Wout’s development harder and earlier than he would if the Dutchman hadn’t been around. Wout would have had more time to grow into the under-23s. They pushed each other and now everyone else is suffering.
    Fully recovered from his horrific 2019 Tour crash, Wout van Aert is the most exciting bike racer in the world. Domestique, sprinter, climber, time trials, cyclo-cross and Tour de France stage wins - he can do it all


    The Rouleur Longreads Podcast brings you selected long form articles from the magazine, especially recorded for Rouleur. Don’t stop what you’re doing – do it while listening to the world’s best cycling writing.


    The latest in this series is ‘The Wout Factor’ by Olivier Nilsson-Julien, from Rouleur 20.7. Download the Rouleur app and use the code WOUTFACTOR to read the whole issue free of charge.
     
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    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
90 Ratings

90 Ratings

PJ@TJ ,

mr

made me think they are right about Lance he does have a place in leTour history and should be reinstated

EdPeters2 ,

The best edition of the Rouleur Podcast

Just listened to 'The Officialy Unbelievable Ronde van Vlaanderen' episode of the Rouleur Podcast. Without a doubt the best episode of this podcast.. Only I don't think it was made by the Rouleur Podcast.. oh well

MajorWagonWheel ,

Brilliant

A great podcast bringing cycling thought-provoking conversation and an excellent background to the magazine. Well worth a listen.

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