90 episodes

This podcast is a personal exploration into what it means to be a human and the experiences it brings. Episodes include essays, reporting, and interviews with people who teach, challenge, confuse, and maybe even piss me off. I may touch on explicit topics and use language not acceptable for sensitive people.

Overlapping topics include philosophy, governance, geopolitics, economics, technology and culture. I try to get out of the usual lanes and cross disciplines, professions, social silos, political tribes and cultural boundaries.

I'm a creative freelancer from the United States; entrepreneur, marketer, inventor, musician, maker, artist, and a podcaster. I’ve been told I live outside of the box, but I really don’t even know where the box is and I don’t care. I have respect for all opinions, beliefs and backgrounds and I’m a good listener and find myself focusing more on the present than worried about the future. I look forward to sharing this podcast with you and welcome your feedback. Let’s all do uncommon things. Cheers!

The Uncommon Podcast Robb Jarrett

    • Society & Culture

This podcast is a personal exploration into what it means to be a human and the experiences it brings. Episodes include essays, reporting, and interviews with people who teach, challenge, confuse, and maybe even piss me off. I may touch on explicit topics and use language not acceptable for sensitive people.

Overlapping topics include philosophy, governance, geopolitics, economics, technology and culture. I try to get out of the usual lanes and cross disciplines, professions, social silos, political tribes and cultural boundaries.

I'm a creative freelancer from the United States; entrepreneur, marketer, inventor, musician, maker, artist, and a podcaster. I’ve been told I live outside of the box, but I really don’t even know where the box is and I don’t care. I have respect for all opinions, beliefs and backgrounds and I’m a good listener and find myself focusing more on the present than worried about the future. I look forward to sharing this podcast with you and welcome your feedback. Let’s all do uncommon things. Cheers!

    The Five Universal Laws of HUMAN STUPIDITY | 90

    The Five Universal Laws of HUMAN STUPIDITY | 90

    We underestimate the stupid, and we do so at our own peril.

    In 1976, a professor of economic history at the University of California, Berkeley published an essay outlining the fundamental laws of a force he perceived as humanity’s greatest existential threat: Stupidity.

    Stupid people, Carlo M. Cipolla explained, share several identifying traits: they are abundant, they are irrational, and they cause problems for others without apparent benefit to themselves, thereby lowering society’s total well-being. There are no defenses against stupidity, argued the Italian-born professor, who died in 2000. The only way a society can avoid being crushed by the burden of its idiots is if the non-stupid work even harder to offset the losses of their stupid brethren.

    SPONSORS:
    ROBB ORIGINALS: https://RobbOriginals.com
    THE CALIFORNIA WINE CLUB: https://shrsl.com/27lqb
    BLUE COOLERS: https://shrsl.com/28ljf
    BETTERHASH: https://www.betterhash.net/?ref=65168

    CONNECT WITH ME:
    WEB: http://robbjarrett.com
    PODCAST: http://robbcast.com
    LINKEDIN: http://linkedin/in/robbjarrett
    YOUTUBE: https://bit.ly/3k75ark
    FACEBOOK: http://fb.me/robbjarrettpodcast
    TWITTER: http://twitter.com/robbjarrett
    INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/robbjarrettpodcast
    MINDS: http://minds.com/robbjarrett
    RUMBLE: http://instagram.com/robbjarrettpodcast
    LOCALS: https://locals.com/member/RobbJarrett
    ODYSEE: http://minds.com/robbjarrett

    • 11 min
    Cannibals Ate Him? The Story of Michael Rockefeller | 89

    Cannibals Ate Him? The Story of Michael Rockefeller | 89

    In the early 1960s, Michael Rockefeller vanished somewhere off the coast of Papua New Guinea. His disappearance shocked the nation and prompted a manhunt of historic proportions. Years later, the true fate of the heir to the Standard Oil fortune has been uncovered — and it’s more disturbing than anyone at the time imagined.

    SPONSORS:
    ROBB ORIGINALS: https://RobbOriginals.com
    THE CALIFORNIA WINE CLUB: https://shrsl.com/27lqb
    BLUE COOLERS: https://shrsl.com/28ljf

    CONNECT WITH ME:
    WEB: http://robbjarrett.com
    PODCAST: http://robbcast.com
    LINKEDIN: http://linkedin/in/robbjarrett
    YOUTUBE: https://bit.ly/3k75ark
    FACEBOOK: http://fb.me/robbjarrettpodcast
    TWITTER: http://twitter.com/robbjarrett
    INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/robbjarrettpodcast
    MINDS: http://minds.com/robbjarrett
    RUMBLE: http://instagram.com/robbjarrettpodcast
    LOCALS: https://robbjarrett.locals.com
    ODYSEE: http://minds.com/robbjarrett

    • 14 min
    2022 Bird Flu Outbreak, Everything You Need to Know | 88

    2022 Bird Flu Outbreak, Everything You Need to Know | 88

    In recent days, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has identified cases of deadly avian influenza in U.S. flocks and put the poultry industry on high alert. At the same time, an outbreak was confirmed in a backyard flock of birds in Fauquier County, Virginia.

    In December 2014, avian influenza (also known as bird flu or HPAI H5) had spread in the U.S. for the first time since 2004. Since that December, more than 40 million turkeys and chickens have been killed by the virus.

    This is a worrisome time for many backyard chicken farmers. Many people are unsure how best to care for their chickens during this time. We have compiled the latest information on bird flu so you have everything you need to keep your chickens safe during this endemic time.

    • 21 min
    Why is Elon Musk So Successful? Can It Work For You? | 87

    Why is Elon Musk So Successful? Can It Work For You? | 87

    We can rattle off Elon Musk’s accomplishments in our sleep: co-founder of monetary giant PayPal; founder of Tesla, the electric car company that is literally changing the world; and founder of SpaceX, the company that is trying to take us out of this world and colonize another. We can also absentmindedly rattle off a stream of adjectives that describe him: innovator, leader, genius, visionary, futurist, entrepreneur.

    But can we describe why Musk is the way he is? And can we not only quantify those things that make Musk so successful, but also begin to embody them in our own lives? This might be a little bit more difficult to do, but I think it's possible.

    • 12 min
    WD-40, Miracle Juice In A Spray Can. The Story Behind It. | 86

    WD-40, Miracle Juice In A Spray Can. The Story Behind It. | 86

    What can you do with a can of it? Lubricate M-16s, catch bigger fish, de-ice door locks, clean turtles, repel pigeons, remove dog shit, make a flame-thrower, and a bunch of other things you probably never thought of.
    If you could take the American spirit which is equal parts Daniel Boone, Chuck Yeager, and Elon Musk—and distill it into an aerosol, it would be a blue-and-yellow can of WD40. A 1983 survey revealed that 4 in every 5 American homes had a can of WD40 in them.For more than 60 years, we’ve been relying on the 40th attempt of a Water Displacement formula to fix, well, whatever needs fixing. The WD40 website promotes dozens of uses for their product, as well as a list of 2,000 uses submitted by actual users. Some are genius. Some are just plain wacky. And some are stupid as hell.

    The story of WD40 begins in 1953, when the fledgling Rocket Chemical Company—all three employees—set out to create a line of rust-prevention solvents and degreasers for the aerospace industry. Working out of a tiny lab in San Diego, it took them 40 attempts to perfect a water-displacement formula. And so Water Displacement 40 came to be. An aerospace contractor named Convair first used the product to protect the outer skin of the Atlas Missile, which had external steel “balloon” fuel tanks that were so thin and delicate that they had to remain pressurized even when empty to keep from collapsing. Over time, Convair employees began sneaking the stuff home for their own uses. By 1958, the product was commercially available.

    There have been all sorts of guesses about what exactly is in WD40, but the company isn’t saying. In 2009, Wired Magazine sent some to a laboratory to have it analyzed. The verdict? Fish oil, Vaseline, and “the goop inside homemade lava lamps.” Fact is, nobody knows. The formula has never been patented, apparently from fear somebody would find out. Instead, it’s a closely guarded trade secret locked up in a bank vault in San Diego.
    By 1960, the company more than doubled in size, growing to seven people, and sold an average of 45 cases per day from the trunks of their cars to hardware and sporting-goods stores in the San Diego area.

    The small-niche nature of the business began to change in 1961, when Hurricane Carla struck the U.S. Gulf Coast. WD-40 Employees came in on a Saturday to produce extra product to meet the needs of disaster victims, to recondition flood- and rain-damaged vehicles and equipment. Before long, it spread like wild fire into American households and industry.
    In 1969, the Rocket Chemical Company was renamed for WD40, which by then was its sole product. Early versions of the can show a rocket on the label. But by the time of the name change, it was long gone. It’s not just for rockets anymore. During the Vietnam war, packages containing the spray were being sent to soldiers to keep their finicky M-16s cycling.
    For years, the number one complaint about the product was that people lost the little red straw that came with each can. In 2005, the company introduced the foldable Smart Straw to solve this problem.

    Some extremely weird uses for the product have been reported over the years. Police once used WD40 to remove a naked burglar who had become wedged inside of ductwork. It was used to help pull a boa constrictor from pipes on the underside of a bus. A pet owner used it to free his parakeet—and himself—from sticky fly paper.
    The unusual use most of us are likely aware of is as a fish attractant. According to the company, customers call in all the time claiming that they’ve caught their biggest fish ever after spraying hooks or lures with WD40 and thus assume that the product must have fish oil in it. But that is not the case, say the owners, and they do not recommend using the spray as a fish attractant.
    Some tout WD40 as a waterproofer for boots and shoes. It’s also recommended to stop wicker chairs from squeaking. Some...

    • 10 min
    The REAL HISTORY of Valentines Day. Who was St. Valentine? |085

    The REAL HISTORY of Valentines Day. Who was St. Valentine? |085

    On Feb. 14, sweethearts of all ages will exchange cards, flowers, candy, and more lavish gifts in the name of St. Valentine. But I can tell you that at the root of our modern holiday is a beautiful fiction. St. Valentine was no lover or patron of love.

    Valentine’s Day, in fact, originated as a liturgical feast to celebrate the decapitation of a third-century Christian martyr, or perhaps two. So, how did we get from beheading to betrothing on Valentine’s Day?

    • 13 min

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

BBC Radio 4
The Telegraph
BBC Radio 4
BBC Radio 4
Crowd Network
Fearne Cotton