47 episodes

In depth conversations that explore cutting edge research and analysis from the University of Liverpool. From cancer smelling machines, to nano-medicine, to the Beatles, this podcast explores the frontiers of science and culture.

The University of Liverpool Podcas‪t‬ University of Liverpool

    • Courses
    • 4.7 • 42 Ratings

In depth conversations that explore cutting edge research and analysis from the University of Liverpool. From cancer smelling machines, to nano-medicine, to the Beatles, this podcast explores the frontiers of science and culture.

    #046 3D printing muscle and bone

    #046 3D printing muscle and bone

    There is a tremendous amount of hype about the potential of 3D printing. The technology is already able to produce customized, one-of-a-kind prosthetic limbs, or artificial hips for patients. These devices are designed specifically to fit each individual’s unique anatomy. On today’s podcast, we’re going to take a leap into the not-so-distant future of 3D printing. A place where limbs are not so much 3d printed as grown. And the components are not plastic and metal but flesh and blood.  Dr Kate Black, she is a lecturer in Lecturer in Additive Manufacturing in the Department of Mechanical, Materials & Aerospace Eng at the University of Liverpool.

    • 22 min
    #044 What the Irish referendum tells us about fake news

    #044 What the Irish referendum tells us about fake news

    Professor Louise Kenny knew she would find herself embedded in a heated debate when she joined the campaign to repeal Ireland's eighth amendment. After all, the change to the Irish constitution would end the country's near-total ban on abortion. What was surprising however was the degree to which fake facts, false stories and foreign opinions infiltrated the discussion. It is increasingly clear there was an organized effort by foreign parties to influence the outcome of a democratic process. But in the end, it didn't work. And the 'Yes' side's success offers a fascinating case study in how to rise above the growing tide of fake news.

    • 32 min
    The bright side of ancient Egypt's ‘dark age’

    The bright side of ancient Egypt's ‘dark age’

    For many, ancient Egypt conjures up images of the Great Pyramids of Giza or the splendours of Tutankhamun’s tomb. A series of eras between those two well-known chapters in Egypt’s history are known as the intermediate periods. Historians have long referred to this time as a dark age, but recent scholarship is challenging that idea. Dr Glenn Godenho (https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/archaeology-classics-and-egyptology/staff/glenn-godenho/) is a Senior Lecturer in Egyptology at the University of Liverpool. His research focuses on this 120-year period following the collapse of the first kingdom that built the famous pyramids.

    • 30 min
    #042 The struggle to balance work and non-work roles

    #042 The struggle to balance work and non-work roles

    Many modern couples begin their lives together expecting to share work and non-work roles equitably. But soon after children enter the picture, a mix of unequal workplace policies and differing cultural expectations for each partner challenges that egalitarian impulse. Eventually, many couples find the division between work and non-work roles becomes increasingly unbalanced as their family grows. Dr Laura Radcliffe researches and lectures on managing non-work roles and identities. Dr Radcliffe is a lecturer in organisational behaviour at the University of Liverpool. In her public talks, Dr Radcliffe uses storytelling to demonstrate how roles and identities can form almost mysteriously, without any clear decision to follow one particular path. She brings that story to us in this episode.
    Music is by Lee Rosevere under CC license. Listen to more of Lee's music here: https://leerosevere.bandcamp.com/

    • 31 min
    #041 How to overcome decision inertia

    #041 How to overcome decision inertia

    On 3 July 2018, Thai rescuers safely extracted the last of 12 boys and their football coach from deep inside a flooded cave. The rescue mission was complex, dangerous and had to be devised and executed quickly. For Professor Laurence Alison, this makes the rescue a fascinating case study in overcoming decision inertia. Decision inertia is the psychological process during crises that freezes decision making. It happens when a decision maker struggles to commit to a choice, when all options could yield negative consequences. Prof Alison contrasts the Thai cave rescue with the Grenfell Tower fire disaster and discusses how emergency responders, and by extension, all high-stakes decision makers, can overcome the paralysing effects of decision inertia.

    • 25 min
    #040 Click Farms and Digital Slavery

    #040 Click Farms and Digital Slavery

    Nearly 5 million people in the UK are now self-employed. Technology has made it easier than ever to open a business or offer your services to others willing to pay but this shift towards gig employment concerns many analysts including Dr Ming Lim. Dr Lim is an Associate Professor in Marketing and Management, University of Liverpool. She argues that many of the folks we see, tapping away at computers at off hours in coffee shops are actually working for click-farms and the work they do, is actually a form of slavery.

     
     

    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
42 Ratings

42 Ratings

Olive Alwyn ,

One of the most informative

Different subject every week and a host that sounds genuinely interested

Bettyboo1805 ,

Fascinating stuff!

Im a University of Liverpool graduate and this is a great way to feel like i stay in touch. Fascinating series of diverse topics and well worth a listen!

Peter Radio ,

Predicting volcanoes

Highly informative and very well explained by Dr Kavanagh and so enthusiastic in her specialism

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