42 episodes

We believe that gardening and being outdoors should be fun and no nonsense. The best way to do that? Sit some Northerners around a microphone to share their gardening adventures.

Trowels and Tribulations Trowels and Tribulations

    • Leisure
    • 4.8 • 5 Ratings

We believe that gardening and being outdoors should be fun and no nonsense. The best way to do that? Sit some Northerners around a microphone to share their gardening adventures.

    E42 Worm farming with the Urban Worm

    E42 Worm farming with the Urban Worm

    This was recorded live at the Harrogate flower show. 
    In this episode with talk to Anna from The Urban Worm CIC. 
    https://theurbanworm.co.uk/
    Urban Worm is a social enterprise committed to raising the profile of worm farming as the ecological and economical solution for organic waste management and organic agriculture. We support schools, communities, businesses, farmers and families harnessing the power of the humble earthworm to build the foundations for food production to flourish, and for societies to thrive in the face of adversity.

    Why Worm Farm?


    The reality of climate change, natural resource depletion and mass urbanization present unprecedented threats to global food security and the survival of humanity. Worm farming provides solutions to help us meet and address these challenges, as individuals, communities, institutions and businesses. The process particularly lends itself to the urban environment with small scale indoor, low tech and low cost systems. With 83 % of the UK living in cities an urban worm farming movement is essential for future food security and provides easy solutions for our kitchen waste.
    Food waste emits the green house gases (GHG) methane and nitrous oxide that are 31 and 310 times stronger than carbon dioxide, respectively. On an individual and grassroots level, worm farming has the potential to reduce GHG emissions by significantly reducing the volume of food waste directed to landfill, and in turn alleviates the necessity for fossil fuel-powered collection vehicles.
    Worm farming enables us to regenerate the earth, producing nutritionally rich fertiliser and compost from our waste to support the production of nutritionally rich food. With less than 40 years of topsoil left in the UK and less than 60 years globally we must act accordingly if we wish to thrive in the face of adversity and avoid mass famine. Worm farming offers the opportunity to rebuild the earth in our homes, within our communities and on our farms. The paradigm of industrial chemical-dependent agriculture has taken precedent over farming for more than a century, with disregard for the health and life of the soil and for those who work the land. Consequently the health of humanity and the earth has suffered beyond measure and we are now faced with feeding the world when our source of food production is diminishing rapidly. Investing in advanced agrotech is not the answer, investing in the earth, and the earthworm, is.

    Worm farming, otherwise known as vermiculture (vermis from the Latin for worm) is the process of harnessing earthworms to convert organic waste into the world’s most nutrient-rich fertiliser; worm manure. Worm manure – also worm castings or vermicompost – is teeming with minerals, nutrients and beneficial micro-organisms essential for healthy plant growth, root development and disease suppression. Due to the nutritional superiority of worm manure, farmers and gardeners often refer to it as ‘Black Gold’, with one tablespoon enough to feed a small plant for three months.
    Among the 4000 known species of earthworm seven are suitable for use in worm farming, all belonging to the epigeic category. Epigeic earthworms are red in colour and are surface dwellers, thriving in fresh rotting organic waste. Throughout the world the most commonly employed species is the Tiger Worm, sometimes referred to as the Red Wiggler or Californian Red (Eisenia Fetida). Native to Europe, the Tiger Worm has exceptional adaptability and tolerance to a range of food sources, temperature variation (10—30°) and moisture content (60—90%). Possessing both male and female sexual organs their hermaphroditic biological nature enables earthworms to reproduce very quickly. The Tiger Worm in particular has the capacity to double its population every 60 days and consume up to half its body weight a d
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    • 15 min
    E41 Pond plants with Aquatic Fanatics

    E41 Pond plants with Aquatic Fanatics

    This was recorded live at the Harrogate flower show
    In this episode we talk to Megan and Linda from  https://www.aquaticfinatic.co.uk/

    #gardening #trees #gardening-podcast #horticulture #nature #flowers #podcast #herbs #vegetables #herbs #pondplants 
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    • 14 min
    E40 Passion for growing fruit with Hilary Dodson

    E40 Passion for growing fruit with Hilary Dodson

    This was recorded live at the Harrogate flower show
    The group was formed in November 1995 by a group of like-minded people with a passion for fruit growing.  Our membership has since grown to over 400 in number with a wide range of expertise from novice to professional  growers.  Geographically the group covers a large area, along with our members in Yorkshire, our membership spreads as far as Scotland, west Wales, northern France and the Netherlands!
    The aims of the group are:
    to promote knowledge of growing fruit of all varieties, particularly those suitable for growing in the north of Englandto raise awareness of fruit growing through exhibition of fruits at shows and other meetings open to the publicto register old fruit varieties and orchards of the North and advise on orchard care and maintenanceto take part in research projects concerning the growing of fruit#gardening #trees #gardening-podcast #horticulture #nature #flowers #podcast #herbs #vegetables #fruit Support the show

    • 16 min
    E39 Micropropagation with Richard Fenwick

    E39 Micropropagation with Richard Fenwick

    This was recorded live at the Harrogate flower show
    In the episode we talk to Richard Fenwick
    Richard Fenwick studied horticulture at Askham Bryan College qualifying at Level 5 and specializing in Micropropagation and plant science.
    Richard has worked in horticulture for over 15 years in a range of sectors including; commercial nursery work, garden maintenance, retail and design. In 2012 Richard became a tutor/course manager at Bishop Burton College teaching a range of subjects at levels 1 to 6. 
    He has been a STEM Ambassador for 15 years promoting the STEM subjects in schools and colleges in partnership with NYBEP.
    #gardening #trees #gardening-podcast #horticulture #nature #flowers #podcast #herbs #vegetables #Micropropagation #flowershow 
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    • 15 min
    E38 The love of Coffee with Vicky Weddell

    E38 The love of Coffee with Vicky Weddell

    Moneyrow Beans was founded by Vicky Weddell out of her passion for coffee and for coffee-loving communities around the world. Having worked in the speciality coffee industry in the Middle East for some years in training and events, she wanted to bring great coffee to her local community in Berkshire and started it all from her garden shed in Moneyrow Green during the first COVID lockdown in 2020.
    We now roast our coffee in small batches in our Coffee Den in the Moss End Garden Village. We are really proud to partner with some amazing local businesses including coffee shops, pubs and retail outlets. We have a growing local following enjoying Moneyrow Beans at home and you will often see us at local markets and community events.
    Moneyrow Beans is also proud to be the first UK Distributor for Gorilla Conservation Coffee, a social enterprise which supports coffee farmers in the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest in Uganda as part of Conservation Through Public Health programme.
    All our coffees are sourced with an ethos of traceability and care for the coffee-producing communities at origin.
    https://moneyrowbeans.com/


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    • 34 min
    E37 Alan Titchmarsh talks about Horticap

    E37 Alan Titchmarsh talks about Horticap

    In this episode we have a quick talk to Alan Titchmarsh. Alan has been the patron of Horticap  for over 18 years. He talked with the customers, volunteers, staff and of course the students and thanked them for the hard work over the past couple of years.  Horticap is a charity in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England. Its been running for nearly 40 years. They teach horticulture to adults with learning difficulties.  We talked to him about what horticulture and Horticap means to him. 
    #gardening #trees #gardening-podcast #horticulture #nature #flowers #podcast #herbs #vegetables #alan #titchmarsh #loveyourgarden #loveyourweekend #ITV 
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    • 12 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

Roxy's Dad ,

Darwinian Gardening!

Great show. I really enjoyed the gentle conversational style. I also now feel exonerated. Although I didn’t know it until today, I too have a ‘Darwinian Garden’.

Scottish Country Garden ,

Northern charm

This is what podcasting’s all about! 3 great friends round the table in the potting shed or out and about visiting gardens and shows, chatting about the magic of gardening. This charming programme has real warmth coupled with that marvellous northern sense of humour. This is not GQT, though, so if you like more trad broadcasting, this may not be for you. For me, it’s curiously addictive...! And I’m a Scot!

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