10 episodes

The content strategy experts at Scriptorium discuss how to manage, structure, organize, and distribute content.

The Content Strategy Experts - Scriptorium Scriptorium - The Content Strategy Experts

    • Business

The content strategy experts at Scriptorium discuss how to manage, structure, organize, and distribute content.

    The importance of terminology management (podcast)

    The importance of terminology management (podcast)

    In episode 102 of The Content Strategy Experts podcast, Sarah O’Keefe and Sharon Burton of Expel talk about the importance of terminology management.

    “If we don’t give customers the information to understand what we’re telling them, they won’t be successful and we have failed.”

    – Sharon Burton



    Related links:



    * Expel’s website



    Twitter handles:



    * @sarahokeefe

    * @sharonburton



    Transcript: 

    Sharon Burton:                   Welcome to The Content Strategy Experts podcast, brought to you by Scriptorium. Since 1997, Scriptorium has helped companies manage, structure, organize and distribute content in an efficient way. My name is Sharon Burton, and I’m your guest today.

    Sarah O’Keefe:                   And my name is Sarah O’Keefe, and I’m hosting. I delegated reading our bumper to Sharon because, well, there were some attempts and it didn’t go well. But, hopefully the rest of this episode will be more professional because we’ve got Sharon in charge.

    SO:                   In this episode, I want to talk to Sharon about terminology management. Sharon Burton is a longtime friend of mine and also a senior content strategist at Expel. Sharon, welcome and thank you for taking on guest hosting.

    SB:                   You’re welcome. I’m very happy to contribute to the overall mirth levels.

    SO:                   This is going to be trouble.

    SO:                   Tell us a little about yourself and your job at Expel, and what Expel does.

    SB:                   The honest to goodness truth is I’ve done pretty much everything there is to do in this field. At least, it certainly feels like that.

    SB:                   What I’m doing at Expel, I’m salaried at Expel, which is also new. I’ve not had a lot of salaried jobs. We work in the cybersecurity space. This is a new space for me, which is exciting. One of the things I love about our field is you always get to learn new things. I’m learning about cybersecurity. What we do is we are your offsite security management staff. There are groups of people in mid to larger companies called a security operations center.

    SB:                   A medium to large company will have a group of people staffed called SOC, S-O-C, security operations center. Those kinds of people will monitor all of your hardware, and your software, and make sure that the people logging into the networks are the right people and all of that. The problem with that, and there is a big problem with that in the cybersecurity industry, is multi-fold.

    SB:                   Number one, there aren’t enough people out there who are trained to do this, flat out aren’t. There’s a huge deficit of people. Number two, the people in the security business, because there aren’t a lot of them, they job hop a lot. Because as soon as they get bored, they can go get another job doing something interesting elsewhere, so you have a lot of staff turnover. And number three, sitting there and watching the logs of all of this stuff, all day long, is mind-numbingly boring. So you have staff shortage, mind-numbing boring and people job hop.

    SB:                   What Expel does is we are your, if you will, offsite stock. But, we’ve got a whole bunch of tools and technologies, and all kinds of fun things that we’ve developed, so that we don’t bore our people. We’ve got all kinds of bots that do exciting and fun things. And, we’re a young company, we’re only five years old. When I started, they knew I was the first content anybody and they hired me because they knew that to move the product forward in any way,

    • 18 min
    Life with a content management system (podcast)

    Life with a content management system (podcast)

    In episode 101 of The Content Strategy Experts podcast, Elizabeth Patterson and Sarah O’Keefe talk about what life is like with and without a content management system (CMS).

    “You have to decide, by looking at your particular organization, whether you need what a CMS will give you. You will get improvements in consistency and automation for formatting and traceability. You can get improvements in translation because you have more consistent content and better workflows.”

    – Sarah O’Keefe



    Related links: 



    * Buyer’s guide to CCMS evaluation and selection

    * Glue strategy: Connecting web CMS to CCMS

    * Content management and localization: Finding the right fit



    Twitter handles:



    * @sarahokeefe

    * @PattersonScript



    Transcript: 

    Elizabeth Patterson:                   Welcome to The Content Strategy Experts podcast brought to you by Scriptorium. Since 1997, Scriptorium has helped companies manage, structure, organize, and distribute content in an efficient way. In this episode, we talk about what life is like with and without a content management system. Hi, I’m Elizabeth Patterson.

    Sarah O’Keefe:                   And I’m Sarah O’Keefe.

    EP:                   And today we’re going to dive into the world of content management and CMSs. So I think it would be great to start with a couple of definitions. Sarah, could you tell us what content management is, and also what a content management system is?

    SO:                   Content management is, according to Wikipedia because that’s always the right place to go, is a set of processes and technologies that support management of information, basically. So collecting, publishing, managing, editing, delivering. A content management system or a CMS then is software that helps you do content management. So how do you create, how do you modify, how do you deliver digital content? Within the CMS world, we then distinguish, there are hundreds, if not thousands of CMSs with different kinds of sub-features or sub-specialties, learning content management systems for learning content. But in our world, there are a couple of important ones. One is the distinction between a back-end content management system and a front-end CMS. A back-end CMS is where you park the content that you are creating, editing, reviewing and approving. And a front-end CMS is where you park the content that you’re delivering.

    SO:                   So a lot of today’s websites, maybe most of today’s websites, run on web content CMSs. So it’s a delivery system of some sort that controls the display of what we’re doing and what we’re dealing with. Now, in addition to all of that, in our world of structured content, you also talk about a component content management system or a CCMS, and that is a specialized back-end content management system that lets you manage typically XML, but structured hierarchical content. It typically does not have formatting associated with it. That’s the job of the front end delivery system, whatever that may be. But a CCMS is there to help you manage modular, smart, intelligent XML content. If you’re involved in any sort of content operation, if you work in content and you have any scale at all, then you know that managing the content that flows through your operation is just an enormous challenge.

    SO:                   Keeping track of who’s writing what,

    • 18 min
    Content strategy success at Crown (podcast)

    Content strategy success at Crown (podcast)

    In episode 100 of The Content Strategy Experts podcast, Bill Swallow and special guest Jodi Shimp discuss their experience with digital transformation and implementing a new content strategy at Crown Equipment Corporation.

    “The initial and earliest win in the project was the go-ahead to even bring on consultants to help us determine what the scope would be and what the true need would be across all the different groups.”

    – Jodi Shimp



    Related links: 



    * Crown Equipment Corporation

    * The Scriptorium approach to content strategy

    * How to align your content strategy with your company’s needs (podcast)



    Twitter handles:



    * @billswallow

    * @CrownEquipment



    LinkedIn profiles:



    * Jodi Shimp



    Transcript:

    Bill Swallow:                   Welcome to The Content Strategy Experts podcast, brought to you by Scriptorium. Since 1997, Scriptorium has helped companies manage, structure, organize and distribute content in an efficient way. In this episode, we’ll talk with Jodi Shimp about her experience with digital transformation and implementing a content strategy at Crown Equipment Corporation.

    BS:                   Hi, everyone. I’m Bill Swallow. And today I have a very special guest, Jodi Shimp joining me. Hi, Jodi.

    Jodi Shimp:                    Hi, Bill. Hello, Bill. Hi, everyone.

    BS:                   Thanks for coming here. So before we dive in, can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

    JS:                    Yeah. So, like Bill said, I am Jodi Shimp with Crown Equipment Corporation. I have been working with Scriptorium implementing a content strategy in the past, probably about seven years. So we went from a very unstructured content development process, and I started that as a technical writer, and over the past seven or so years, we’ve been working on a big digital transformation of all that content at Crown.

    BS:                   And what was your reason for starting that project?

    JS:                    For Crown, there were really two major starting points that got our strategy rolling from people, just talking about a need for something different to actually moving things forward. And for the main content teams in marcom and techcomm, it was the fact that we had overlapping product in different regions and overlapping content to support that project in different regions, being supported by two or more different content teams. For executives, the big pain point was the need to better support our globe growth and our burgeoning global market. Their need was to fix translations because at that point we did have a patchwork of translations and content processes, but we just needed to get that overall into something smooth that felt like it was a consistent process as opposed to ad hoc responsiveness.

    BS:                   So it was more or less both getting your arms around those source content development problems. And then also being able to get your arms around the translation spend.

    JS:                    Right. Thankfully it aligned very much to be two birds with one stone, if you will, because the content creators, the problems that they were seeing in their source content are what was actually causing a lot of the problems in the localization processes and content. So fixing the source was really the key to getting it all right.

    BS:                   And I suppose that came with a bunch of wins during the course of the pr...

    • 19 min
    The evolution of smart content (podcast)

    The evolution of smart content (podcast)

    In episode 99 of The Content Strategy Experts podcast, Alan Pringle and special guest Larry Kunz of Extreme Networks talk about the evolution of smart, structured content.

    “I’m a huge believer in big picture. We really need to stand back and ask ourselves, ‘What is this really all about? What are we trying to accomplish?’ It’s not about the content. It’s about the customer.”

    – Larry Kunz



    Related links: 



    * Evolution of content (podcast)

    * Scaling smart content across the enterprise

    * Rebranding as a business case for smart content (podcast)



    Twitter handles:



    * @alanpringle

    * @larry_kunz



    Transcript:

    Alan Pringle:                   Welcome to The Content Strategy Experts podcast, brought to you by Scriptorium. Since 1997, Scriptorium has helped companies manage, structure, organize, and distribute content, in an efficient way. In this episode, we talk with Larry Kunz, about the evolution of smart, structured content. Hey everyone. I’m Alan Pringle. And today, we have a special guest on the podcast. I’ve got Larry Kunz here. Hi Larry.

    Larry Kunz:                    Hi Alan. It’s great to be here. Thank you so much for having me. It’s a real pleasure.

    AP:                   Absolutely. And I want to give our audience a little bit of understanding about your background. So would you kindly introduce yourself, and tell us a little bit about your experiences in the content world?

    LK:                    Sure. I’ve been in technical communication, mostly in the computer industry, for more than 40 years. I won’t allow us exactly how many. I was working for IBM, when structured content came to be a thing, when DITA was being developed. I wasn’t one of the people who was developing it, but I was a very early user, and very quickly came to understand the value of structured content. I really thought it was a good thing, and my opinion has never changed. I have done time in marketing communication. And I’ve done training and consulting. But when the income tax form comes around every year, I still put technical writer as my occupation.

    AP:                   And I remember, at one time, I had technical editor on mine. So I totally get that. And because you do have that really deep expertise, and we all know you got started when you were an infant. We all know that you got started very, very, early in this industry. But I think it would really help this discussion. And what I’m going to talk about is how smart, structured content has evolved. And for what it’s worth, I’ve been doing this for over 30 years now. And I will not be more specific than that. You’ve got a little more experience than I do. But I’m glad to be paired up, and to have this discussion, because I have seen things change quite a bit over the years. But on the flip side of that, sometimes it’s say, the more things change, the more they stay the same.

    AP:                   So let’s talk about that, first, to level the playing field. I want to talk about, basically, what is smart structured content? Now, on the Scriptorium side, this is how we define smart content. It’s modular content with tags and metadata. And the formatting is separate. It’s applied later, based on the intelligence that you build in to that tagging and metadata. Now, I know before we started this podcast, we were talking about ideas. And you said you had a little bit of an issue with the te...

    • 14 min
    The pros and cons of markdown (podcast, part 2)

    The pros and cons of markdown (podcast, part 2)

    In episode 98 of The Content Strategy Experts podcast, Sarah O’Keefe and Dr. Carlos Evia of Virginia Tech continue their discussion about the pros and cons of markdown.

    “If you want to make a website and you need to write the text in a fast way that does not involve adding a lot of the brackets that are in HTML syntax, I think that’s the main use for markdown.”

    –Dr. Carlos Evia



    Related links:



    * The pros and cons of markdown (podcast, part 1)

    * Does markdown fit into your content strategy?

    * Lightweight DITA podcast: part 1 with guests Carlos Evia and Michael Priestley 

    * Lightweight DITA podcast: part 2 with guests Carlos Evia and Michael Priestley



    Twitter handles:



    * @sarahokeefe

    * @carlosevia



    Transcript:

    Sarah O’Keefe:                   Welcome to The Content Strategy Experts Podcast, brought to you by Scriptorium. Since 1997, Scriptorium has helped companies manage, structure, organize and distribute content in an efficient way. My name is Sarah O’Keefe and I’m your host today. In this episode, we continue our discussion about the pros and cons of markdown with Dr. Carlos Evia. This is part two of a two-part podcast. So when we talk about markdown, because I think that probably most of the people on this podcast in general are more familiar with DITA. When you talk about markdown, what is the sort of use case for markdown, the clearest possible place where you say “oh, this is a case where you definitely want to use markdown.” What are those factors?

    Dr. Carlos Evia:                   You need to make content that is going to be published mainly to the web and here I say mainly because markdown now, that part of processing the syntax that used to be in the beginning, “let’s process with this tiny, tiny tool that will only convert to HTML or XHTML,” now there are many other tools that can actually process and transform markdown to other things to create that multichannel publishing that we also do in DITA.

    CE:                   So, I think the main use case is if you need to have something that is going to be published or presented in a website, and you do not want to write HTML. It’s a shorthand, just like when we were back in junior high, the cool thing was that you will take a course in typewriting, so you can be working with computers. This is back in the Fred Flintstone days.

    CE:                   But before you could touch the keyboard, you had to take a course on shorthand, and shorthand was several syntaxes. I think there are two amazing texts for shorthand. You had to learn how to do it with a pencil, actually a special pencil. And there were different notations that you will do. And then, once you dominated those things and you could take dictation super fast, you can go and transcribe it using the keyboard.

    CE:                   So I think that’s kind of the equivalent of markdown. If you want to make a website and you need to write the text for your website in a fast way that does not involve you adding a lot of the brackets that are in HTML syntax, I think that’s the main use for markdown. Write it following this very simple text-based syntax.

    CE:                   And then there will be a tool that will transform it, and mainly to a website. But like I said, there are some things,

    • 14 min
    The pros and cons of markdown (podcast, part 1)

    The pros and cons of markdown (podcast, part 1)

    In episode 97 of The Content Strategy Experts podcast, Sarah O’Keefe and Dr. Carlos Evia of Virginia Tech discuss the pros and cons of markdown.

    “I think markdown has a huge user base because most people need to develop content for the web. But there’s a set of people that need to be working in something more structured for a variety of reasons, and those are the ones who use DITA.”

    –Dr. Carlos Evia



    Related links:



    * Does markdown fit into your content strategy?

    * Lightweight DITA podcast: part 1 with guests Carlos Evia and Michael Priestley 

    * Lightweight DITA podcast: part 2 with guests Carlos Evia and Michael Priestley



    Twitter handles:



    * @sarahokeefe

    * @carlosevia



    Transcript:

    Sarah O’Keefe:                   Welcome to The Content Strategy Experts podcast brought to you by Scriptorium. Since 1997, Scriptorium has helped companies manage, structure, organize and distribute content in an efficient way. My name is Sarah O’Keefe and I’m your host today. In this episode, we discuss the pros and cons of markdown with Dr. Carlos Evia. Dr. Evia is a professor and associate Dean at Virginia Tech and also the Chief Technology Officer in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences. Additionally, he’s an expert on DITA XML and has worked toward bringing structured authoring concepts into university curricula. This is part one of a two-part podcast.

    SO:                   Carlos, welcome and welcome back to the podcast.

    Dr. Carlos Evia:                   Yeah. Thank you for having me again on the podcast.

    SO:                   Well, welcome back. And let me start with the basic question and the theme for this podcast, which is what is markdown?

    CE:                   Ay yay yay. Well, that’s a tricky thing because if you go back to the 2004 definition from John Gruber, markdown was supposed to be a very simple text to HTML syntax that will kind of look like, I don’t want to use the word structure, but here I am using structure. Like a structured email message or the kind of structured text that we all people used in use nets. For all you youngsters out there, when the web was this new thing and the internet was pretty much text-based and using it was well, you could get all your entertainment, but it was text. To make the text readable, we used some hashtags and underlines and asterisks to emphasize and highlight components. Markdown came to life as part one, precisely that, kind of simple syntax that would make text easy to read, easy to digest, easy to understand. But then the second thing that markdown had was a little tool that will convert that syntax to actual HTML because people were running HTML and they would be like, oh, brackets, who needs that?

    CE:                   Then you wouldn’t need to have brackets. You will just write following that syntax. And then there was a little tool that will attach to blog engines, like mobile type back in the early 2000s and that will automatically convert that text to HTML syntax to actual HTML or back in the day, XHTML, that would be presented to web browsers. And that’s it. That’s where markdown was. But I think the evolution of markdown has gone in very interesting ways, not because of the developers or the creators of markdown, but by the use cases that users have given to markdown.

    CE:                   And now you can see people who think of markdown as a,

    • 11 min

Top Podcasts In Business

Listeners Also Subscribed To