93 episodi

Welcome to Managing Uncertainty, a podcast series discussing global risk, crisis management, business continuity, and crisis communications. You’ll learn strategies, tactics, and resources about preparing for, responding to, and recovering from all sorts of disruptions and critical moments.

Will you be ready to lead through your company’s critical moment?

Managing Uncertainty Bryghtpath LLC

    • Gestione

Welcome to Managing Uncertainty, a podcast series discussing global risk, crisis management, business continuity, and crisis communications. You’ll learn strategies, tactics, and resources about preparing for, responding to, and recovering from all sorts of disruptions and critical moments.

Will you be ready to lead through your company’s critical moment?

    Managing Uncertainty Podcast - Episode #93: Crisis Management Plans - What your executives really want

    Managing Uncertainty Podcast - Episode #93: Crisis Management Plans - What your executives really want

    In this episode of the Managing Uncertainty Podcast, Bryghtpath Principal & Chief Executive Bryan Strawser discusses what your executives are really looking for in your crisis management plans.
    Topics discussed include executive roles in a crisis management framework, developing crisis management plans, crisis exercises, executive interactions, and more.
    Related Episodes & Blog Posts Episode #4: The Crisis Team Episode #18: The Race Episode #23: Crisis Management is not a Pickup Game Episode #46: Interacting with the C-Suite Blog Post: What the CEO needs to understand about planning for a crisis //static.leadpages.net/leadboxes/current/embed.js
    Episode Transcript Bryan Strawser:
    Hello and welcome to the Managing Uncertainty podcast. This is Bryan Strawser, principal and chief executive here at Bryghtpath. I'm flying solo today and we're going to do a short episode this week talking about crisis management plans, and what I want to focus on our discussion about crisis management plans, a topic that we've talked about numerous times before, is what happens when your executives get involved? When your executives are at the table, involved in your crisis process, what do they really want? What are your executives really looking for in terms of a crisis management plan?
    Bryan Strawser:
    If you remember in our previous episodes and blog posts we've done over the years about building crisis management plans and crisis management frameworks, what we've really talked about in those situations is building something that has a crisis management team that is below the executives, that really is managing that moment-by-moment action that we want to happen during a crisis. They're coordinating across the organization. They're communicating, they're collaborating, they're making those moment-by-moment decisions.
    Bryan Strawser:
    The role that we typically reserve for the executives is to support the work of that crisis management team, usually in a couple of key areas around large scale expense and capital commitment. They're making decisions about the organization's reputation, and they might be taking active steps to manage the reputation of the organization, but they're really focused in that middle area there. I'm sorry, they're focused on rather on really those big picture issues where they're supporting the crisis management team. Your crisis management team is really made up of those day-to-day managers from across the organization who are doing the real work in responding to the crisis. Your executives are there to support the work that that crisis management team is doing and making decisions on the type of things that escalate to them.
    Bryan Strawser:
    Here's my experience. My experience and I just went into this a few weeks ago with a client who is managing a data incident. The executives became involved earlier in the process than usual, and because they weren't as familiar with the process, they dove into a lot of questions and superseded, to some extent, the role that was really defined for them. I think this is common. This is something that I've seen a lot, where I see, in exercises in particular, in exercises where the executive management team begins to participate and almost without fail, we see them try to make up the process as they go along instead of following the crisis plan that has been put together and assembled with roles for their role as an executive. Most of the time, I would say, they do a good job in just the ad hoc process. After all, they're usually good networkers and good collaborators and good decision-makers, and so they're ad hoc, making it up along the way. Usually turns out okay, but they definitely miss things, and they miss things because they're not following the plan that has been outlined for them.
    Bryan Strawser:
    What I recommend, what we recommend, is we build crisis manageme

    • 10 min
    Managing Uncertainty Podcast - Episode #92: Novel Coronavirus

    Managing Uncertainty Podcast - Episode #92: Novel Coronavirus

    You won't want to miss this episode.
    There are few things that have caught the attention of business leaders and individuals around the world right now in the way that the Novel Coronavirus outbreak in China has garnered attention.  For a virus that was unheard of prior to December 2019, as of this podcast publication, there are nearly 25,000 cases just in China alone - with hundreds of new confirmed cases each and every day.
    In this episode of the Managing Uncertainty Podcast, Bryghtpath Principal and Chief Executive Bryan Strawser provides an overview of Novel Coronavirus - what it is - how it's impacting businesses, countries, and individuals, and recommended steps that companies and individuals should take right now to ensure their long-term continuity of operations.
    Bryghtpath Coronavirus Resources Blog Post: Bryghtpath publishes new Novel Coronavirus whitepaper & briefing Bryghtpath Briefing: Novel Coronavirus //static.leadpages.net/leadboxes/current/embed.js
    Related Episodes & Blog Posts Episode #4: The Crisis Team Episode #6: Personal Preparedness Episode #37: Taking care of the team during a crisis Episode #39: Travel Safety & Security Programs Blog Post: What the CEO needs to understand about planning for a crisis Blog Post: Making decisions in the midst of a crisis Episode Transcript Bryan Strawser: Hello and welcome to the Managing Uncertainty podcast. This is Bryan Strawser, principal and chief executive here at Bryghtpath. I'm flying solo again today for this episode where we're going to talk about probably the top issue that's going on in the emergency management or crisis management world right now and that is novel coronavirus. The outbreak that began in the Wuhan province of China and has now led to what appears to be becoming a global pandemic, the likes of which we haven't really seen since H1N1 just over a decade ago. Novel coronavirus. We're going to talk a little bit about what it is. What is a coronavirus, the impact and spread of the virus, its impact on business and travel, its impact on businesses and our recommendations for businesses and individual precautions in terms of travel and medical treatment? And we'll talk about some things you should be thinking about as this outbreak continues, things you should monitor as an organization, as a crisis management or business [inaudible] leader within your organization.
    Bryan Strawser: Let's start by just explaining coronavirus briefly. The novel coronavirus was detected in December 2019 so not very long ago when several cases of pneumonia were identified in Wuhan city in the Hubei providence of China. The virus did not match any previously seen virus. A week later on January 7, 2020, Chinese health officials confirmed the identification of a new virus. On January 30th the world health organization or WHO declared a global public health emergency over the spread of coronavirus, citing the potential for the spread of the virus to countries that were not prepared to deal with the contagion. The US Department of Health and Human Services or HHS similarly declared a public health emergency on January 31, 2020. Common signs of infection with novel coronavirus are respiratory symptoms, fever, cough, shortness of breath and breathing difficulties. In severe cases, this infection causes pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome or SARS, kidney failure, and even death.
    Bryan Strawser: The virus has been temporarily named coronavirus. It also has an acronym which is 2019-nCoV for novel coronavirus of 2019. I assume, I'm not an expert on this particular topic, but I assume this will eventually have a different name, but right now it's novel coronavirus. A coronavirus, you're probably wondering what that is. A coronavirus is a large family of viruses that can cause illnesses ranging from the common cold to more serious diseases. Some of these

    • 17 min
    Managing Uncertainty Podcast - Episode #91: Roles and Responsibilities in a Business Continuity Program

    Managing Uncertainty Podcast - Episode #91: Roles and Responsibilities in a Business Continuity Program

    In this episode of the Managing Uncertainty Podcast, Bryghtpath Principal & Chief Executive Bryan Strawser along with Consultant Bray Wheeler, discuss roles and responsibilities in a business continuity program.
    Topics discussed include ISO 22301, Business Continuity Governance, roles and responsibilities, executive sponsors, program managers, program management, business continuity leadership, boards of directors, and many more.
    Related Episodes & Blog Posts Blog Post:  8 Things to consider when choosing a business continuity consultant Blog Post:  Using ISO 22301 to evaluate your business continuity program Blog Post:  Why invest in business continuity? Blog Post:  A look at the new ISO 22317 Standard for Business Impact Analysis (BIA) Blog Post:  Rethinking Business Continuity - Applying ISO 22301 to improve resiliency, managing risk, and drive profitability in your organization Blog Post:  Presentation - A program management approach for business continuity management Episode Transcript Bryan Strawser: Hello and welcome to the Managing Uncertainty Podcast. This is Bryan Strawser, principal and chief executive here at Bryghtpath.
    Bray Wheeler: And this is Bray Wheeler consultant here at Bryghtpath.
    Bryan Strawser: And for today's episode we're going to talk a little bit about the roles and responsibilities within a business continuity program. Or if you want to use the ISO 22301 specific definition. We're going to talk about roles and responsibilities in a business continuity management system.
    Bray Wheeler: Fancy.
    Bryan Strawser: Very fancy. A BCMs. But business continuity program, like what are the roles inside of a business continuity program?
    Bray Wheeler: Well if we want to probably start at the kind of the very top, because we'll probably spend the least amount of time there is that kind of steering committee, kind of the overall kind of governance structure of the program and the process within the organization.
    Bryan Strawser: And I think we're going to dive more specifically into governance and a steering committee in a future episode. But when we're talking about a steering committee, we're really talking about an interdisciplinary group of leaders probably just below the executive level. But it depends on how your company's size and structure come into play. But it's a group of folks who, if you read the Standards definition right, their role is to make sure that the program is aligned to the strategic objectives of the organization and that the program is achieving its goals and objectives that had been outlined and approved through this governance process. So they're almost at the top. They're not at the executive level, but they could be in your organization, but they're really up here. You can't see me. I've got my hands up in the air.
    Bray Wheeler: They're taking the proverbial 50,000-foot view of-
    Bryan Strawser: That's right.
    Bray Wheeler: ... the program within the organization to make sure that it's not just some kind of sideshow or it's not minimized or that there is that connectivity throughout the organization.
    Bryan Strawser: And although we'll get into this in another episode as a deep dive. I think it is important to think about this is not just a proforma body that you're going to get in front of and give updates. It needs to be an actual governance body where there's good give and take. Where they're holding the program accountable to the goals and objectives of the program and ensuring that they're aligned against the direction of the company is going. What are the strategic objectives of your organization?
    Bray Wheeler: So it's not quite like the capital funds committee that you have to go present in front of that we've talked about in past podcasts where it's a thumbs up, thumbs down, Caesar kind of moment. It really is that, does this make sense? Tell me a little bi

    • 22 min
    Managing Uncertainty Podcast - Episode #90: Drone strikes and soft targets

    Managing Uncertainty Podcast - Episode #90: Drone strikes and soft targets

    In this week's edition of the Managing Uncertainty Podcast, our first for 2020, Bryghtpath Principal & Chief Executive Bryan Strawser discusses the recent drone strikes carried out against Iranian aligned unconventional forces, militia, and government officials by the United States - with a focus on steps that businesses that operate in the region - and globally - should consider as tensions rise and escalations occur in retaliation.
    Topics discussed include intelligence, monitoring threats, freedom of navigation, travel safety & security, soft target protection, detecting pre-attack surveillance, and other measures that companies should take.
    Editorial Note Despite knowing the proper pronunciation of Qasem Soleimani's name, I pronounced it incorrectly multiple times during this episode. My apologies for my error. -- Bryan
    Related Episodes & Blog Posts Episode #76: BryghtCast for the week of October 7th, 2019 Episode #78:  BryghtCast for the week of October 14th, 2019 Blog Post: Top 12 Global Risks of 2018 //static.leadpages.net/leadboxes/current/embed.js
    Episode Transcript Bryan Strawser: Hello and welcome to the Managing Uncertainty Podcast. This is Bryan Strawser, principal and chief executive here at Bryghtpath, and I'm running solo again today. We're here to talk about Iran and the Middle East. Given recent events that have occurred over the last couple of weeks throughout Iraq and Iran and the involvement of the United States admitted, confirmed involvement of the United States on a drone strike killing an Iranian official near the Baghdad airport about a week ago.
    Bryan Strawser: I'm sure you're familiar with the details of the incident, but to back up a little bit, there has been for a number of months, years even in Iraq, a number of attacks on United States military interest throughout the region that have connectivity back to the unconventional forces of the government of Iran. These unconventional forces in many cases, were the Quds Force, Q-U-D-S, and the commanding general of the Quds Force. Quds is the unconventional warfare arm of the Iranian military and intelligence apparatus. The commanding general was Major General Suleimani and a week ago as he was leaving the Baghdad airport in a three-vehicle convoy with some allies of his, no Iraqi government officials but Aronian allies that operate within Iraq, his convoy was struck by a series of missiles fired from a U.S. Government Reaper drone, a more modern version of the predator.
    Bryan Strawser: Killed in this drone strike were General Suleimani along with some local allies as how I'd outlined before. It took a little bit of time, a few hours before this was confirmed, and then a few more hours for the United States to announce that they had made the drone striking, accepting responsibility for the strike. In addition in the following days, but the United States executed a number of other strikes, some of which our government has confirmed, some of which have not been confirmed as well as a special operation in Yemen that attempted to capture one of our top 20 wanted terrorists who was another close ally of the Iranian unconventional forces, the Quds Forces.
    Bryan Strawser: Now, the geopolitics with all of this are super complex. They go back centuries in some cases and certainly some of it goes back to the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s. There's some very strongly held differences of opinion between the two countries but the important part here is there's just no mistaking that the United States' decision to strike General Suleimani was a very significant event in terms of the current conflict in the Middle East. And General Suleimani was a leading strategist for unconditional warfare, he played a very significant role in the Middle East as the Quds Force and the Iranian government has been involved with Hamas, with Hezbollah and with other unaffilia

    • 15 min
    Managing Uncertainty Podcast - Episode #89: Looking ahead to 2020

    Managing Uncertainty Podcast - Episode #89: Looking ahead to 2020

    In this episode of the Managing Uncertainty Podcast, Bryghtpath Principal & Chief Executive Bryan Strawser takes an informal look forward to 2020 and the potential risks that are just around the corner.
    Related Episodes & Blog Posts Episode #26: The Top 12 Global Risks of 2018 Blog Post: The Top 12 Global Risks of 2018 //static.leadpages.net/leadboxes/current/embed.js
    Episode Transcript Bryan Strawser: Hello and welcome to the Managing Uncertainty podcast. This is Bryan Strawser, principal and chief executive here at Bryghtpath and this is our final episode for 2019. I'm recording this on Monday, December 30th you're going to hear this later in the day. I am running solo today as it's quite a snowfall going on here in the twin cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul, Minnesota. But I wanted to take a moment and just provide a little bit of a look ahead to 2020. I believe we're going to do a more formal kind of preview of the coming year with both Bray and I. But I wanted to hit on a couple of things that are on our mind as we turn the calendar here in a couple of days to 2020 and wrap up the decade of the 2010s and look forward to the decade of the 2020s.
    Bryan Strawser: The first thing that is on my mind as we head into 2020 is that here in the United States at least this is a presidential election year. In addition to that, all of the United States Congress is up for election along with a third of the United States senate. So this is going to bring all of the inherent politics that come along with a situation in a calendar year like this, a presidential election year. I think it's also, just given that our society has become more and more partisan and certainly has become, I think, a little more rancorous with the current presidents and they both support and opposition for President Trump's policies, that's going to be a pretty pivotal issue in the news and how businesses and individuals react in the year to come.
    Bryan Strawser: The second and one that we've talked about frequently on our BryghtCast podcast and in previous episodes, in previous reviews that we've done of coming years, and talking about the top global risks, is that we appear to have come to the final decision when it comes to the United Kingdom's exit from the European Union or Brexit. That was settled pretty much in the election that occurred in Britain just a few weeks ago. Brexit, the Brexit implementation bill has passed the UK parliament. We're going to see that breakup occur, it looks like at the end of January, 2020, although that date may move around.
    Bryan Strawser: But really next year in terms of Brexit, not only will Brexit be implemented but now it's time for the real negotiation, and the real negotiation is, what will the relationship be between the United Kingdom and the European Union in the years to come? And there is a lot of negotiation, a lot of issues that need to be discussed and decided in the coming weeks and months. And that will have global economic implications, it'll have implications for EU citizens that live in the United Kingdom today. It looks like they'll be allowed to stay through a immigration scheme that is being developed and will be implemented. But there's a lot of uncertainty about what this is going to look like, and Brexit will certainly be on the minds of all of us who are thinking about uncertainty and disruption in 2020.
    Bryan Strawser: The third big one here in the United States at least, is that the auctions for the 5G wireless bands, wireless frequencies will go up for auction sometime in 2020 or 2021. Many States have passed implementing regulations around this. But the big thing is when the United States government goes to sell the actual bandwidth, goes to sell the actual frequencies and the 5G licenses that go along with that. That'll be a big deal. 5G is a significant improvement over 4G and 4G LT

    • 11 min
    Managing Uncertainty Podcast - Episode #88: What is the goal of crisis management?

    Managing Uncertainty Podcast - Episode #88: What is the goal of crisis management?

    In this week's episode of the Managing Uncertainty Podcast, Bryghtpath Principal & Chief Executive Bryan Strawser discusses the goals of a crisis management framework & process at your organization.
    Topics discussed include crisis management, frameworks, crisis teams, crisis communications, social media, reputation management, business continuity, and long-term recovery efforts.
    Related Episodes & Blog Posts Blog Post: What is the goal of crisis management? Blog Post: What is Crisis Management? Blog Post: An Introduction to Crisis Management Blog Post: Making Decisions in the Midst of a Crisis Episode #4: The Crisis Team Episode #23: Crisis Management is not a Pickup Game Episode #38: How do you make a plan for that which you have not foreseen? //static.leadpages.net/leadboxes/current/embed.js
    Episode Transcript Bryan Strawser: Hello and welcome to the managing uncertainty podcast. This is Bryan Strawser, principal and chief executive here at Bryghtpath and I'm flying solo today. I'm recording this the last full week of the year, just after Christmas 2019. And the office is quite quiet today, which is a good time to do some creative work, but I want to talk a little bit about the goal of crisis management or what we're really trying to get at when we talk about crisis management processes and frameworks. Really what are we trying to go after when it comes to crisis management?
    Bryan Strawser: As we think about crisis management, I think it's important to ponder and understand the fact that a business can experience many different types of crises during the life cycle, the course of business that they're engaged in. Those can range from data breaches to natural disasters, to violent attacks, to executive misconduct and everything that's kind of in-between there.
    Bryan Strawser: The goal of crisis management as we think about it is to have a system in place to effectively address the coordinated response, the resources, internal and external communication requirements during and after the negative situation. And in fact, I would even argue that we're really trying to do this before, from a preparedness standpoint, before the boom or as Juliette Kayyem, from Harvard, likes to say left of boom. That we have this opportunity to prepare these things before the boom happens, before the critical moments.
    Bryan Strawser: How you accomplish these tasks as an organization will impact your organization's reputation and your ability to recover your business operations. Let's talk a little bit about just potential crisis situations. We would argue here at Bryghtpath that your crisis planning is based upon challenges, reasonable challenges, that we think your company might face. And that you should try to identify those events that are most likely to happen in order to develop an appropriate response in advance. Again, a left of boom preparedness activity.
    Bryan Strawser: All businesses, for example, are at risk of data breaches. The severity might be different depending upon what your particular industry is. Customer service problems, a loss of competitive advantage. There are also other risks that are inherent to specific types of businesses, manufacturing, retail service focus businesses. So we would argue that you should review your current business practices, your areas of focus, your past problems and disruptions and work to identify issues that could severely damage your organization and then make sure that you have a plan in place to address them. Keeping in mind that you may need to take some different steps or different protocols to address various situations.
    Bryan Strawser: Behind all of this, we look for a coordinated response. We look for a consistent crisis management framework that outlines how you will make decisions and how you will communicate the results of those decisions from your organization. Your bigg

    • 14 min

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