500 episodes

Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

Philosophy Talk Starters Philosophy Talk Starters

    • Education

Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

    464: The Athlete as Philosopher

    464: The Athlete as Philosopher

    More as https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/athlete-philosopher.

    For the ancient Greeks, sport was an integral part of education. Athletic programs remain in schools today, but there is a growing gap between the modern sports experience and enduring educational values such as self-discovery, responsibility, respect, and citizenship. Is there a way to bridge this gap? Can sports be a means to teach values such as these? Josh and Ken try out with Heather Reid from Morningside College, author of "The Philosophical Athlete."

    • 10 min
    523: Disinformation and the Future of Democracy

    523: Disinformation and the Future of Democracy

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/disinformation-and-future-democracy.

    The 2020 election and startling events that followed show that the US is as polarized as ever. Not only is there fundamental disagreement over values and goals, but people can’t seem to agree on the most basic, easily verifiable facts, like who actually won. With so many seemingly living in an alternative reality, how do we continue the business of democracy together? Should we adopt paternalistic policies towards fellow citizens who are so profoundly divorced from truth? And does our current plight suggest that the project of liberal democracy is failing? Ray and guest co-host (emeritus) John Perry stay informed about their guest, attorney and political analyst Dean Johnson, co-host of KALW's Your Legal Rights.

    • 9 min
    461: Radical Markets - Solutions for a Gilded Age?

    461: Radical Markets - Solutions for a Gilded Age?

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/radical-markets.

    Many people think that growing inequality, the rise of populism and nativism, and the decay of democratic institutions all have the same cause—the overreach of markets. The solution, they believe, is to limit the market through regulation. But what if rather than shrinking the market, the answer lies in expanding the market? Is it possible that we haven't let markets go far enough? Do our current regulations lead to too many monopolies? And could turning more things into assets that are for sale to the highest bidder actually be the solution to our new gilded age? Debra and Ken buy and sell with Glen Weyl from Yale University, co-author of "Radical Markets: Uprooting Capitalism and Democracy for a Just Society."

    • 11 min
    522: Montaigne and the Art of the Essay

    522: Montaigne and the Art of the Essay

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/montaigne-and-art-essay.

    French thinker Michel de Montaigne invented a whole new genre in which to do philosophy: the essay. But in his use of that form, Montaigne repeatedly digresses and contradicts himself. So why did he think the essay was a good medium for philosophy? What impact did Montaigne’s invention have on his own philosophical work, and on the centuries of thought that followed? Are there particular forms of writing that help us live a more philosophical life? The philosophers live their best life with Cécile Alduy from Stanford University, author of "The Politics of Love: Poetics and Genesis of the "Amours" in Renaissance France (1549-1560)."

    • 9 min
    463: The Ethics of Algorithms

    463: The Ethics of Algorithms

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/morality-algorithms.

    Recent years have seen the rise of machine learning algorithms surrounding us in our homes and back pockets. They're increasingly used in everything from recommending movies to guiding sentencing in criminal courts, thanks to their being perceived as unbiased and fair. But can algorithms really be objective when they are created by biased human programmers? Are such biased algorithms inherently immoral? And is there a way to resist immoral algorithms? Josh and Ken run code with Angèle Christin from Stanford University, author of "Algorithms in Practice: Comparing Web Journalism and Criminal Justice."

    • 11 min
    521: The 2021 Dionysus Awards

    521: The 2021 Dionysus Awards

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/2021-dionysus-awards.

    After a year in which "entertainment" took on a whole new meaning, what were the movies that challenged our assumptions and made us think about things in new ways? Josh and guest co-host Jeremy Sabol talk to philosophers and listeners as they present our eighth annual Dionysus Awards for the most thoughtful films of the past year, including:

    • Best Film Painting a World Without Men
    • Best Picture That Packs All of American History Into One Room
    • Trippiest Investigation of Identity (That Probably Should Have Ended Sooner)

    • 16 min

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