12 episodes

Bill Hartman speaks with the leaders in human performance.

Bill Hartman's Coaching Conversation Bill Hartman

    • Education

Bill Hartman speaks with the leaders in human performance.

    Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 29, 2019

    Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 29, 2019

        Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 29,2019   This week on BillHartmanPT.com:  What words are meaningful to your client: https://billhartmanpt.com/question-what-words-are-meaningful-to-your-clients/   This week on YouTube:   Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 22, 2019:  https://youtu.be/IE0mjTb1z7g Why you should individualize exercise prescription:  https://youtu.be/WOvkZ36Fmys   This week on Instagram (@billhartmanpt):   Finding your solution to your pain The importance and value of teaching to learn The evolution of your continuing education Videos for The 16%   This week’s Questions:   Could you explain what’s going in the pelvic floor when someone is doing a goblet squat in the rack with a band attatched to the J hooks so when they squat down it’s almost as if they are bouncing off of it! I’m curious on the intent behind it, when it’s appropriate, and why? With your help to date my ‘hingey’ squat is looking more squatty (thanks!). To date I have been using light front bar squats (circa 50kg including the bar). When the SSB arrives I am looking to increasingly load my squatty squat. My understanding is that targeting a squatty squat will help improve my movement variability by helping me become less exhale biased & compressed. But I also understand that improving force production may re-enforce my compressed exhale biased axial skeleton. In light of this – using the SSQ bar is there a limit to how much I should progress the loading of a squatty squat?   Does the ability to abduct the femur = pelvic diaphragm eccentrically orienting and the pelvic outlet closing. And the ability to adduct the femur = pelvic diaphragm concentrically orienting and pelvic outlet widening. Are these useful tests to figure out where someone is limited in the propulsion arc?   What typically is the underlying driver in an individual that presents with excessive femoral IR in standing static posture and excessive bilateral “leg whip“ when running ?  Is it typically an excessive anterior orientation of the entire pelvis vs a sacral nutation with Ilial ER  ?   What tests do you use to determine if you have a compressive strategy? -what is being compressed? -what is the result?     Do you believe the entire human body is a literal tensegrity structure? Or are there just some elements of tensegrity within the system. Read something interesting about how the spine can’t be a literal tensegrity structure because the compression elements do not actually cross each other.   I am very fascinated with pelvic mechanics at the moment and was hoping you could offer some good resources to learn from as well.  

    • 18 min
    Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 22, 2019

    Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 22, 2019

    https://billhartmanpt.com/ https://infastonline.com/ Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 22, 2019 This week on YouTube: Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 15, 2019: https://youtu.be/t3obO9J0IJ8 The IFAST Podcast #7 – The what, why and how of continuing education: https://youtu.be/ltw_swOprj4 Understanding the Influence of Orientation on Range of Motion: https://youtu.be/mpmS5ubWjVw This week on Instagram: A clip from The IFAST Podcast about why I do The Intensive the way I do A clip from my Cutting Mechanics video as to how the pelvic diaphragm behaves I introduced Cartoon Bill this week about eliminating unnecessary jargon A clip from the Influence of Orietation video A Terry Project update Videos for The 16%... This week’s questions: 2:07 Riddle me this Batman...How can 2 individuals who both present with table test of limited left Hip IR (has 10 degrees), limited right ER (30 degrees), and limited hp extension in side lying (-5) Both have limited shoulder IR bilaterally Right (10 degrees) Left (30 degrees), but have at least 90 degrees of shoulder ER Left (90) and Right (97), yet 1 individual was presents as a Narrow ISA while the other presents as a wide? How can this be? 4:46 Looking at the wear pattern of their shoes, both clients bias towards the outside edge of their feet. My thought is that their femur is biased in internal rotation but their foot is biased towards external rotation, putting torque on the knee. Am I on the right track? 6:53 I was hoping you could offer more insight about helices and how it pertains to the body. I am open to and agree that all movements are rotations, but I am getting lost when you start talking about helices and would greatly appreciate some clarification or at least a starting point from which I can start to learn from. 9:30 What drives an anterior compressive strategy at the pelvis, thus limiting hip IR due to increased fluid in the anterior pelvis ? You have explained that a concentric orientation of posterior pelvic musculature occurs due to “elongation” and shape change of posterior pelvis with an anterior compressive strategy 13:29 I was looking at the pump handle as being similar to hip extensions. If I can’t depress the pump handle the my neck will substitute the remainder by extending? 14:48 How does grip variance affect elbow and shoulder function? Index vs pinky dominant grips? 17:11 Can you break down the shape change of the pelvis and behavior or the pelvic floor during acceleration and max velocity sprinting? #infrasternalangle #billhartman #pelvictilt

    • 20 min
    Bill Hartman's Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 15, 2019

    Bill Hartman's Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 15, 2019

    Bub’s Burger Eating Challege – I am now 3-0 in eating contests. This week on YouTube: Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for the 16% - December 8, 2019: https://youtu.be/dvAufow_1Fg The QB Docs Podcast with Drew Kiel and Bill Hartman: https://youtu.be/hNmwdAo-k-E The IFAST Podcast #6 with Mike Robertson and Bill Hartman – Our Client Foundation: https://youtu.be/Y4kmtvla6ZM Manual Therapy – Mobilization to Increase Shoulder Flexion and Cervical Rotation: https://youtu.be/WgfF-EfEPsM This week on Instagram (@billhartmanpt): Treatment sequencing The Terry Project Thorax shape and shoulder external rotation/shoulder internal rotation The QB Doc Podcast Highlights Videos for The 16% This week’s questions: When squatting, what do you believe the risk/reward is for oly shoes or some sort of heel lift. I know the obvious benefits/risks but in you’re opinion, which outweighs the other? Does it put that much more stress on your knees? Does it allow you to stack your pelvis better? Hip IR? How would you approach working with a patient that was diagnosed with a condition related to central sensitization such as fibromyalgia or complex regional pain syndrome? Are there any specific compensatory strategies you have found to drive central sensitization (or what we may perceive to be central sensitization)? For a wide ISA individual trying to regain his/her squat pattern, what progressions do you use after goblet/kettlebell/zercher squats? In light of Mike Robertson’s complete coach course I think the safety squat bar will be a good squat progression – allowing you to load the squat pattern and keep posterior thorax open for expansion. Do you use the safety squat bar much to load/progress the squat pattern? How do you determine if a proxy measure of the extremity is pathological (ex. ligamentous laxity, capsular instability)? On the opposite end, how would you determine a true tissue extensibility limitation assuming you’ve maximized axial position and respiratory variability? How would you treat these two presentations differently? Piggy-backing off last week’s question, what tests or measures do you apply to determine whether the elbow is oriented towards ER/pronation or IR/supination? From a practical standpoint, what would be do with a narrow campo angle vs. a wide campo angle? I understand that it is a representation of the superficial helical angle that compresses the underlying axial helices, but how does it actually change our approach to gaining more variability or more performance? Why might we use rolling activities for a wide infrasternal angle and quadruped activities for a narrow infrasternal angle ? Can you give an example of an activity for both scenarios? So with respect to internal pressure of the guts and diaphragm with high rate of force production in say a high box jump. You’d want a diaphragm that can concentrically yield and concentrically overcome very quickly? Please, please, please elaborate on how getting into a cut is “ER” and out of a cut is “IR”. In my myopic, acetabulum on femur way of looking at things, it seems as if “loading” should be acetabulum on femur IR and “exploding” should be the reverse. Thanks for all the content! #billhartmanpt #infrastrernalangle #squatting https://billhartmanpt.com/ https://www.instagram.com/ https://www.facebook.com/BillHartmanPT/ https://twitter.com/BillHartmanpt https://www.linkedin.com/in/bill-hartman-501458a/

    • 30 min
    Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 8, 2019

    Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 8, 2019

    Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for The 16% - December 8, 2019 Links to this week on YouTube: Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for the 16% - December 1, 2019: https://youtu.be/U_qdZevvS9U The IFAST Podcast #5 with Mike Robertson and Bill Hartman – How we train the pros: https://youtu.be/Onnpa5gsfa8 A Simple Self-Test to Assess Your Breathing: https://youtu.be/djkJmqL1di0 Simplifying Lower Cervical Mechanics: https://youtu.be/jGzj__fcYn8 Power Output from The Inside-Out: https://youtu.be/pHBok2Iht2o This week’s topics on Instagram (@billhartmapt): Thoracic outlet syndrome and breathing When to prescribe the prone Y exercise Get Client Buy-in Who can you help get better? Simple self-test for breathing Understanding secondary consequences of programming Is there such a thing as muscle weakness? Simple cervical mechanics For The 16% videos

    • 30 min
    Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for the 16% - December 1, 2019

    Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for the 16% - December 1, 2019

    https://billhartmanpt.com/ https://ifastonline.com/ This week on YouTube: Bill Hartman’s Weekly Q & A for the 16% - November 24, 2019: https://youtu.be/aLo5oSUJVrY How to Use Lifting Belts as a Teaching Tool: https://youtu.be/vec1-JgSR_k The IFAST Podcast #4 with Mike Robertson and Bill Hartman - Incentives and Word of Mouth Marketing: https://youtu.be/p4AMnsWyLpQ Before you prescribe I,T,Y exercises, consider the consequences: https://youtu.be/12J8RFt7zaA This week on Instagram (@billhartmanpt): How to use lifting belts as a teaching tool Emphasize a cascade of health The Terry Project manual techniques to expand the upper thorax Videos for The 16% This week’s questions for the Q & A: • If I’m looking at an asymmetrical ISA am I just looking at someone who is constantly turning right? Should I get them turning Left or focus uniform expansion first? • Do you assess ISA in people with TOS? Usually their scapulae are depressed and they have decreased thoracic kyphosis (from what I've seen) which would be indicative of a wide ISA. I've never heard anyone assessing it as a part of the treatment so it would be nice if you could expand on that a little bit. • What's the origin of 16%? • Why is the posterior pelvis, which “starts” in an inhaled orientation, exhaled? Why does the entire pelvis orient anteriorly secondary to compression in the thorax? If an anterior pelvis orientation yields a “mess” of hip IR, what’s the situation with the wide/powerlifting type folk that very much live in anterior orientation yet often have IR of 0. Sincerely appreciate all that you do, and hoping to make an intensive one of these rounds! • In a perfect world, do we start at the “first” compensation? I.e. teach the wides to exhale the ISA and teach the narrows to inhale the ISA, and see what changes? • I think you link concentric exhale biased strategies with weightlifters/strength/hypertrophy. But I also thought training the eccentric improved strength. I think my question is - can you bias your training towards eccentric/inhalation based exercises to improve movement variability and still improve strength/hypertrophy? • Re your box squat video. I think you mentioned that you would dive deeper into this exercise. If you do I am definitely very keen to learn more about how you bias it for your wide ISA clients. • Do fascial lines even matter when it comes to assessing an individual and/or programming? • Could you please go over in more detail how anterior to posterior compression of the pelvis restricts hip motion? https://billhartmanpt.com/ https://www.instagram.com/ https://www.facebook.com/BillHartmanPT/ https://twitter.com/BillHartmanpt https://www.linkedin.com/in/bill-hartman-501458a/

    • 28 min
    Bill Hartman's Weekly Q & A for the 16% - November 24, 2019

    Bill Hartman's Weekly Q & A for the 16% - November 24, 2019

    https://billhartmanpt.com/https://infastonline.com/ I had to miss the Q & A last week because of The Intensive IX, so here are the links to this week’s YouTube videos: The IFAST Podcast #2 – The IFAST Internship: https://youtu.be/kvCH0TtVak8How to Introduce Rolling into Assessments, Breathing, and Training: https://youtu.be/YNvyF8BSMWAThe IFAST Podcast #3 – How We Hire at IFAST (and when to fire!): https://youtu.be/FXquBOCG04AA Better Way to Measure Shoulder Flexion: https://youtu.be/jw1CmVIedB4How to Measure the Infrasternal Angle: https://youtu.be/9WbPR4KIsQoHow to Mobilize the Ankle to Increase Propulsion: https://youtu.be/0LUNtUVL4Ow Topics on Instagram this week (@billhartmanpt): Mixed grip deadlifts and body orientationHow synovial joints work and development of arthritisTraining to bias inhalation and early propulsionDaily videos for The 16% I was interviewed on The QB docs podcast with Drew Keil this week so be looking for that coming up in a few weeks. This week’s questions for the Q & A: Could you elaborate on the “chessboard” which would result in a ton of hip IR with limitations in hip ER? It seems that most compensations result in some brand of anterior pelvic orientation which ought to bias the acetabulum into allowing for much more ER than IR (as in the case of a typical compressed wide ISA individual). How does the anteriorly rotated innominate bias the femur into IR? Question referring to ISA:After establishing wide/narrow what will be your next step.Also what is done with individuals who do not have wide nor narrow. You can say your 108.8. What strategies would be used there? So if the ribs and can open and close as the arms go overhead, would that be an optimal ISA? And what would that mean movement-wise for the person? In your shoulder flexion video, you had Nicki demonstrate a self-test. Is there a cluster of self-tests that would provide the most information for what needs restoration prior to or during training? You have previously mentioned how you are keen to avoid treating clients like rehab clients if you can avoid it. You mentioned that if warm-ups were better this could address a lot of issues. I think you like the bear crawl - could you talk more about your warm-up exercise program? Asymmetrical ribcage? Or am I just always turning right? Would you subscribe to the idea that individual limbs move in a spiral movement trajectory only, or are there some straight line and diagonal influences as well as seems to be evidenced by Collagen lay down? How do internal fluid pressures influence this? Would it be incorrect to consider a concept of spiral muscular/Fascial loops that work like compression and tension-type fluid-filled springs? You stated that although early and late propulsion look similar, the hip position varies between the two, how does the hip position change from early to late propulsion? #billhartmanpt #infrasternalangle #pelvicorientation

    • 29 min

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