132 episodes

Learn from Stanford faculty on a variety of timely topics.

Classes without Quizzes at Reunion Homecoming Stanford

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Learn from Stanford faculty on a variety of timely topics.

    • video
    Reunion Forum: From Inequality to Equal Opportunity

    Reunion Forum: From Inequality to Equal Opportunity

    In recent years, increasing attention has been devoted to inequality, opportunity and mobility. What are the facts on these issues? What are the roles of our government, Stanford and each of us in building opportunity? What factors and policies are likely to have the largest effects on inequality, opportunity and mobility, in America and globally?

    Larry Diamond, ’73, MA ’78, PhD ’80 is the Haas Faculty Director for the Haas Center for Public Service, a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Hoover Institution, and a professor, by courtesy, of political science and sociology.

    Michelle Wilde Anderson is a professor of law at Stanford Law School.

    Michael J. Boskin is the Friedman Professor of Economics, and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.

    Francis Fukuyama is the director of the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law, the Nomellini Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and a professor, by courtesy, of political science.

    Caroline Hoxby is the Bommer Professor in Economics, a professor, by courtesy, of economics at the Graduate School of Business, and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.

    Jesper Sørensen, PhD ’96 is the Jeffe Professor of organizational behavior at the Graduate School of Business, a professor, by courtesy, of sociology, and the faculty director, Stanford Institute for Innovation in Developing Countries.

    Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015 in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service.

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    Finding Meaning in an Unjust World

    Finding Meaning in an Unjust World

    To find meaning in life, people seek happiness, authenticity, spirituality, love, knowledge. But the existence of suffering and injustice begs the question: How can it be right to work on one’s self when others face harder challenges? Professor Willer navigates this tension and offers insights for cultivating a meaningful life without ignoring injustice.

    Robb Willer is an associate professor in sociology, and a professor, by courtesy, of psychology and at the Graduate School of Business.

    Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015.

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    Young Blood for Old Brains

    Young Blood for Old Brains

    Every culture and civilization had its dreams about eternal youth, but what if there was something to it? Professor Wyss-Coray will share an amazing development in aging research that could revolutionize how we understand aging and treat age-related diseases.

    Tony Wyss-Coray is a professor of neurology and neurological sciences.

    Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015.

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    Why the Opera Changed the Course of Music

    Why the Opera Changed the Course of Music

    Operas—those beautiful melodies that stick in our brain for us to sing all week after a show. Are you aware that this started about 400 years ago, thanks to a small group of artists in the city of Florence? Professor Aquilanti shares how they radically changed the way composers wrote music and the inner technique of composition.

    Giancarlo Aquilanti, DMA ’96 is a senior lecturer in music and director of the Music Theory Program.

    Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015.

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    Why Inequality and Violence are Sometimes Good: The Evolution of Human Values

    Why Inequality and Violence are Sometimes Good: The Evolution of Human Values

    Are democracy and gender equality always good? Are violence and wealth inequality always bad? This presentation will dive into what drives changes in human values and what we as a society consider good or evil.

    Ian Morris is a Willard Professor of Classics and fellow of the Archaeology Center.

    Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015 in partnership with the Humanities Center.

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    Misled by the Map: Geography Gets Political

    Misled by the Map: Geography Gets Political

    The standard world political map appears to be a straightforward depiction of the earth’s sovereign states. In actuality, it forwards a vision of how we think the world ought to be structured—omitting some countries and including non-existent others.

    Martin Lewis is a senior lecturer in international history.

    Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2015.

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