299 episodes

This is the podcast that helps you achieve consistency in reading the Bible, and we have a new episode for you every day of the week. We will read the entire Bible in one year.



On Sunday we read from the Epistles, Monday we read from the Law, Tuesday from one of the books of History, Wednesday are readings from the Psalms, Thursday we read from one of the Poetry books, Friday is Prophecy and Saturday we read from the Gospels. And the shows are usually between 10 and 15 minutes.



After completing the day's chapters, host Steve Webb shares a short commentary on that day's reading.



Join us any time!

Lifespring! Family Audio Bible Steve Webb

    • Christianity

This is the podcast that helps you achieve consistency in reading the Bible, and we have a new episode for you every day of the week. We will read the entire Bible in one year.



On Sunday we read from the Epistles, Monday we read from the Law, Tuesday from one of the books of History, Wednesday are readings from the Psalms, Thursday we read from one of the Poetry books, Friday is Prophecy and Saturday we read from the Gospels. And the shows are usually between 10 and 15 minutes.



After completing the day's chapters, host Steve Webb shares a short commentary on that day's reading.



Join us any time!

    LSFAB0090: Mark 5-6

    LSFAB0090: Mark 5-6

    Today's Bible Translation







    Bible translation used in today's episode: Ch.5 NASB, Ch. 6 NLV







    Support







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    Thoughts







    At the end of chapter 6, Jesus sent His disciples across the sea of Galilee, while he wanted some time to himself to go up a mountain to pray. Here in California, we would probably call the mountain a hill. By the way. I had never looked this up until now, but the Sea of Galilee is about 13 miles long and about 7 miles wide. It’s the largest lake in Israel. At its deepest point, it’s about 150 feet deep. 







    Notice, he sent them. And a storm came up when they were about halfway across, with the wind coming directly from the direction they were going. Don’t believe me? Our text says, “Jesus saw that they were in a lot of trouble as they rowed, because they were going against the wind.” And they must have been rowing most of the night, so all the light they might have had was the stars and the moon, if the moon was even out. Have you ever been on the water, away from any lights, in the middle of the night? It can be pitch black. The disciples were understandably frightened. Even the seasoned fishermen were probably afraid.







    Ok. Now I know that Jesus was man as well as God. Do you suppose He knew that the storm was going to come? As God, He certainly would have. But as man? I’m not entirely sure. We do know that He knew some things in advance, but all? I just don’t know. I have a hunch He did. Here’s why.







    Even though they were following His directions, or put another way…they were in His will, the storm came up against them. They had to struggle with all of their might to stay in His will. They could’ve said, “The wind is coming from the direction we are supposed to go. It’s too hard. Let’s turn around. Or let’s tack. We can make headway if we tack.” (Tacking is taking a zig-zag course that allows you to make headway against the wind.) But they stayed the course Jesus told them to go.







    Sometime between 3 and 6 in the morning, Jesus walked out to them. Have you ever thought of this? He was walking on the storm tossed sea! Have you ever seen the surface of a large body of water when the wind is ripping? It’s chaos! But somehow, Jesus was able to walk on it, and He made His way to their boat in the middle of the largest lake in Israel…at least four miles out, evidently with no problem! 







    Now here’s the part that makes me think that He knew the storm would come against the disciples. When He got to the boat, He said, “Calm down! It’s just me. Don’t be afraid. (He said that because when they saw Him walking on the water they thought He was a ghost.) And then He climbed into the boat and the wind stopped. 







    I think Jesus knew the storm was coming, and He wanted to use this as a way to grow their faith in Him. As a matter of fact, in Matthew’s account of this incident, we are told that the disciples said, “You are truly the Son of God.”







    Why is this reported in three of the Gospels? Certainly to show us that Jesus is who He says He is, but it can also be a lesson to us that even when we are doing exactly what we are supposed to do, even when we are exactly in God’s will, we might have to struggle against seemingly insurmountable problems. Following God’s will does not mean that we will not have problems. Obstacles don’t mean that it is time to quit. Struggles don’t mean that we didn’t understand God’s will. Headwinds don’t mean that it’s time to turn around. 

    • 17 min
    LSFAB0089: Jeremiah 1-6

    LSFAB0089: Jeremiah 1-6

    Today's Bible Translation







    Bible translation used in today's episode: Ch. 1-6 NIRV







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    Thoughts







    2 Timothy 3:16 says: All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the servant of God, may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.







    I believe that. Do you? 







    Ok. With that out of the way, here are some thoughts from today's reading







    I love the message from chapter 1, verse five. “This is the account of how God called Jeremiah. God said, “Before I formed you in your mother's body I chose you. Before you were born I set you apart to serve me. I appointed you to be a prophet to the nations."







    This is not a new thought, but I love it when we are reminded that God knows us even before we are conceived. He has a plan for each and every one of us. Before we are conceived. There are no mistakes. There are no unplanned pregnancies. We might be surprised, but God is not. 







    And it is God who forms us. It’s not just biology. It’s not simply random cells multiplying and then dividing into distinct organs and other tissues. It is God himself who fashions each one of us. You are who you are because God made you the way you are. Each of us is different, and each of us is perfect. Maybe not by human standards, but certainly by God’s standards. I happened to be born with what most would consider to be imperfect eyes. I was terribly nearsighted until I got LASIK surgery about 20 years ago. And now that I’m older I’m farsighted. That’s ok. I don’t know why God gave me less than 20/20 vision. But I’m ok with the body he fashioned for me. He made it, so it’s the body I was meant to have.







    The point is that none of us are accidents in any way whatsoever. God knew us before we were born and He has a purpose for us. That is true for each person ever conceived. And I believe that it is wrong, wrong, wrong to voluntarily terminate any pregnancy because of this and other scriptures that confirm this fact. 







    Some may argue with me, but I’m just telling you what the Word of God says. Take it up with Him. 

    LSFAB0088: Job 25-26

    LSFAB0088: Job 25-26

    Today's Bible Translation







    Bible translation used in today's episode: Ch. 25-26 NET







    Support







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    Thoughts







    In Job 25, Bildad compares the awesome power of God to the unlikeliness of a human being righteous before Him. I think that He has this notion because he, like most people of that time, we basing a person’s righteousness on works. But Job, even though by God’s own words to Satan in chapter 1, was “a pure and upright man, one who fears God and turns away from evil” was a man of deep faith in God. I believe that it was because of Job’s faith that God was so pleased with him. 







    And then in chapter 26, Job begins with a sarcastic response to Bildad’s description of God’s might. He says, “My goodness! You have been so very helpful with your great wisdom!” (My “translation”) 







    And then he goes on with an eloquent soliloquy of just a few of God’s great powers, and wraps it up with saying, “These are least of His ways!” (Again, my “translation”.)







    Continuing, Job says, “Having said all this, we have only a faint idea of Him. But who can grasp the enormity of His power?” (Me again.)







    I think Job was saying, “Bildad, you have no idea what you are talking about. You don’t understand God, so who are you to tell me that God is doing these things to me?”







    Understandably, Job is quite testy with his friends at this point.

    • 5 min
    LSFAB0087: Psalms 36-38

    LSFAB0087: Psalms 36-38

    Today's Bible Translation







    Bible translation used in today's episode: Ch. 36 NET, Ch. 37 HCSB, Ch. 38 GWT







    Support







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    Thoughts







    Psalm 36 reaffirms something for me that I have often thought of. In verses 1-5, David talks about the evil man, and how he acts…what he does. And in verse 4, David says, “He plans ways to sin while he lies in bed; he is committed to a sinful lifestyle; he does not reject what is evil.”







    Now, I am far from perfect. In fact, there are times that I feel, like the Apostle Paul, that I am the chief of sinners. But I am constantly amazed by how thieves and liars devise schemes. When I hear how they do things to accomplish their evil deeds, I can hardly believe it. How do they come up with such twisted plans? I could never think that way. It’s incredible!When, for example, I hear about some scheme that someone used to embezzle money or con some old person out of their life savings, I am shocked at how they did it. My mind just doesn’t work that way. I mean, they had to really think in great detail to come up with their plans. My mind just doesn’t work that way.







    Please don’t misunderstand. I’m not saying that I’m without sin. It’s just that my brain just doesn’t think like that. Maybe I'm not smart enough. 







    I like to think, though, that because the Holy Spirit lives in me, He protects me from such thoughts. 







    As a matter of fact, in chapter 37 verse 4, David says, “Take delight in the Lord, and He will give you your heart’s desires.”







    The way I understand that verse, David is not saying that God will give you whatever you want, but that if you delight in Him, He will cause your heart to desire what pleases Him. He will give you your heart’s desires.I have my own share of failures, to be sure. But in my half-century of following Him, I have discovered, like David, that real joy is found in staying as close as I can to God. And I am so very thankful that I am his.







    Beloved, if you don’t have that kind of relationship with Him, I encourage you with everything that is in me to reach out to Him now and ask Him to give you a thirst to know Him, to follow Him, to delight in Him. 

    • 11 min
    LSFAB0086: 1 Samuel 11-15

    LSFAB0086: 1 Samuel 11-15

    Today's Bible Translation







    Bible translation used in today's episode: Ch. 11-12 NKJV, Ch. 13-14 NLT, Ch. 15. NET







    Support







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    Thoughts







    “…but the Lord regretted that he had made Saul king over Israel.”







    What does it mean when it says that the Lord regrets something that He did? Does it mean that God saw that He had made a mistake? 







    When I lose my tempter and speak crossly to someone I love, later on, I regret it. Did I make a mistake when I lost my temper? Was it wrong to say what I said, the way I said it? Usually. 







    When I forget to do something that my wife asked me to do, I regret it when I have to tell her that I forgot. I disappointed her. I made a mistake. 







    Can God make a mistake? Not if He is God. God is, by His very nature perfect. And we have recently read God saying, “I do not change my mind.”







    So what does it mean when we read that God regretted something He did?







    The Hebrew root for the word “regret” is “to sigh”. If you are a parent, you understand this kind of sigh. I remember watching my kids making mistakes, and my wife and I sighing in disappointment. Many times, we could see what led up to the fateful moment, but in the hopeful love of a parent, we so wanted them to make the right decision. And when the inevitable happened, all we could do was sigh.







    This gives us an idea of the regret that God had. Here in chapter 15 of 1 Samuel, God knew that Saul would fail, but it still made Him sigh when it happened.







    I’m sure if you think about it, you can remember a time or two where you have experienced this kind of thing, too.

    • 28 min
    LSFAB0085: Genesis 48-50

    LSFAB0085: Genesis 48-50

    Today's Bible Translation







    Bible translation used in today's episode: Ch. 48 NKJV; Ch. 49-50 NIRV







    Support







    Please remember that this is a listener supported show. Your support of any amount is needed and very much appreciated. Find out how by clicking here.







    Thoughts







    When I read in chapter 48 of Jacob’s blessing of Joseph’s sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, I wondered why Jacob insisted on blessing Ephraim over Manasseh. Manasseh was the older of the two, so custom would put him first. Joseph thought Jacob was perhaps making a mistake, since he couldn’t see. But Jacob insisted. So I thought, “What gives?”







    In doing the research, I could only find that in fact, what would become Ephraim’s tribe did prosper much more than Manasseh’s. As a matter of fact, it became so large that in some places in scripture, when the nation of Israel is referenced, it is called Ephraim. Also, some of Ephraim’s descendants became very important. There was Joshua, Samuel and Jeroboam. All men of God. 







    I found a fascinating study of this at thetorah.com. This is a Jewish website, with Jewish scholars writing at least some of the articles. I love getting the perspective of Jewish people on the Bible. And since Genesis is the first book of the Torah, I am especially interested in what they have to say at thetorah.com. I recommend you take a look at this article. There is so much more there than I have time for on this show.







    Also, thinking about the burial place of Jacob. Remember, it was in the cave purchased by Abraham for Sarah. And then Abraham was laid to rest there, then Isaac and Rebekah, then Jacob laid his beloved Leah there. 







    This past week, I received a phone call from a long-time listener and supporter of LifespringMedia, who is on a multi-month vacation. Part of his travels took him to the holy land.  He told me that on one of the tours he took, he was actually able to visit this very cave! I have to say that on one hand, I am skeptical that they still know where it is, but on the other hand, why would they not know where it is? After all, multiple generations of Jews knew where it was, and Abraham, Isaac and Jacob have been more than important for thousands of years, so why wouldn’t people keep track of the location of their resting site? It’s known as the Cave of the Patriarchs, the Tomb of the Patriarhs, and to Jews as the Cave of Machpelah. Either way, I was somewhat envious when my friend told me he got to see it. I asked him to send some pictures of his travels. When I get some, I’ll post them if he gives permission.

    • 17 min

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