210 episodes

Podcast discussing a variety of great albums from the rock, jazz or folk genres in some depth. Proud part of Pantheon - the podcast network for music lovers.

Love That Album Maurice Bursztynski

    • Music Commentary

Podcast discussing a variety of great albums from the rock, jazz or folk genres in some depth. Proud part of Pantheon - the podcast network for music lovers.

    Van Morrison "Saint Dominic's Preview"

    Van Morrison "Saint Dominic's Preview"

    The history of music (indeed, the history of humankind) is littered with tales of poor behaviour. It can range from stories of murder, molestation and drugs, to reports of every-day obnoxiousness.

    Welcome to episode 138 of Love That Album Podcast.

    As music fans, we make conscious decisions to either overlook or take to heart the behaviour of those we put on a pedestal for their art. We decide whether to separate the art from the artist or hold them accountable for behaviour and beliefs we cannot separate from their output.

    Throughout the career of George Ivan Morison, there have been reported incidents of rudeness and poor treatment of those around him. This is in complete contrast to his music which dwells in themes of love, nature and spirituality – both musically and lyrically. In September 2020, he has tested his fanbase and given fuel to his detractors for the announcement that he is releasing new songs in protest of Covid-19 lockdown. Is this consistent with previous Van-isms or is this one step beyond?

    I am joined by drummer, author, music producer and Van Morrison megafan Pat Thomas to discuss the 1972 release Saint Dominic’s Preview. It is an album that celebrates all that is beautiful in life by a man who sounds like he really believes it. However, it would be disingenuous if we didn’t take the time to discuss the walking contradiction that is Van Morrison (….and yes, we talk about the news of his Covid stance). We also discuss the place his music has in our hearts, his behaviour, his connection to Belfast, and where the album stands developmentally in connection to his catalogue.

    There are artists I refuse to give patronage to for repulsive views that others have no issues with. My continued enjoyment of Van’s music may be in contradiction to others’ beliefs – so be it. There is no one size fits all.

    My huge thanks to Pat for taking the time to join me for a great (virtual) fireside chat. Until he releases his book analysing the work of Van Morrison, you can read his thoughts at https://www.facebook.com/Listen-to-the-Lion-musings-on-Van-his-band-street-choir-102018017848023/ You can order his books “Listen, Whitey! The Sounds of Black Power 1965 – 1975” and “Did It! From Yippie To Yuppie” wherever great books are available from.

    Download this episode of LTA from Spotify, Stitcher or iTunes (search for “Love That Album podcast”). Love That Album is proudly part of the Pantheon Podcast network. Go to pantheonpodcasts.com to check out all their great shows.

    You can send me feedback at rrrkitchen@yahoo.com.au (written or mp3 voicemail) or join the Facebook group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/lovethatalbum.

    If you’d consider writing an iTunes review we’d be immensely grateful. However, it’d be even better if you told a friend about the podcast and Pantheon – at a (socially distanced) barbecue, over coffee (on Skype), on social media….whatever way you choose, consider me grateful.

    • 1 hr 28 min
    John Cale's "Paris 1919"

    John Cale's "Paris 1919"

    How do you approach the music of John Cale? He supposedly butted heads with Lou Reed in the Velvet Underground for being too experimental....the creator of Metal Machine Music didn't like that Cale was too experimental!!!!

    Welcome to episode 137 of Love That Album podcast.

    I am joined by my partner from the See Hear podcast, Bernard Stickwell and first time guest and music-head Fnord Buissant (aka Doug to his family). The central focus of the show is John Cale's most musically accessible album Paris 1919 (but is lyrically dense). The album is named for the post-WW1 Paris Peace Accords, so we explore how 20th century European history (as well as literature and cinema) dictated the subject matter of these songs.

    Of course it wouldn't be an LTA episode without much some peripheral discussion about Cale's career in the Velvet Underground, his work as a producer, how he came to write a (none too flattering) song about Soft Machine songwriter Kevin Ayres, Oliver Reed, Dylan Thomas....and a ton of other things.

    It's been way too long since Bernie did an LTA, so I was really happy to have his perspective (and his recommendation) of this album. Huge thanks also go out to Doug for making the first of hopefully many appearances on the show – the man knows his stuff.

    Download this episode of LTA from Spotify, Stitcher or iTunes (search for “Love That Album podcast”). Love That Album is proudly part of the Pantheon Podcast network..

    You can send me feedback at rrrkitchen@yahoo.com.au (written or mp3 voicemail) or join the Facebook group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/lovethatalbum.

    If you’d consider writing an iTunes review we’d be immensely grateful. However, it’d be even better if you told a friend about the podcast and Pantheon – at a (socially distanced) barbecue, over coffee (on Skype), on social media….whatever way you choose, consider me grateful.

    • 1 hr 30 min
    Interview with John Penhallow about Fairport Convention

    Interview with John Penhallow about Fairport Convention

    The story of English rock music in the 1960s often revolves around some mates meeting up and bonding over a love of blues music or wanting to be the next Beatles.

    Then there's Fairport Convention.

    Welcome to episode 136 of Love That Album podcast.

    Fairport Convention assembled around 1966 and rehearsed in the same neighbourhood as another band of Muswell Hillbillies. The line-up has changed over the years, but the mission has always been to adapt folk music to a rock setting. Early on, they interpreted contemporary folk songwriters from North America like Joni Mitchell, Bob Dylan and Leonard Cohen. Before too long though, the band looked too their own history to make British folk music contemporary.

    Bondi Cigars' guitarist Shane Pacey joins me once again, and we speak with John Penhallow, the first manager of Fairport Convention. John was there right at the very beginning due to his friendship with guitarist Simon Nicol. He played a large part in looking after the band on day-to-day business before Joe Boyd, so he regales us with stories from that period.

    We speak about the early FC days, his work in archiving Sandy Denny's music, Cropredy, some band called The Ravens, and the late Judy Dyble. Beyond telling the story of a band, this is a great story about friendship and community. What other long running band still has ex-members regularly turn up to play with them?John was very generous with his time and memories. Shane and I are thankful for him making himself available.....on his birthday weekend at that!!! Also huge thanks to David Kelly for arranging this, and Mark Snowden for getting us to clarify a very important part of Fairport history.

    Please explore Shane's music at both https://bondicigars.com/ and https://shanepaceytrio.com.au/

    Download this episode of LTA from Spotify, Stitcher or iTunes (search for “Love That Album podcast”).

    Love That Album is proudly part of the Pantheon Podcast network. Go to http://pantheonpodcasts.com/ to check out all their great shows.

    You can send me feedback at rrrkitchen@yahoo.com.au (written or mp3 voicemail) or join the Facebook group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/lovethatalbum.

    If you’d consider writing an iTunes review we’d be immensely grateful. However, it’d be even better if you told a friend about the podcast and Pantheon – at a (socially distanced) barbecue, over coffee (on Skype), on social media….whatever way you choose, consider me grateful.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Sparks "Angst In My Pants"

    Sparks "Angst In My Pants"

    Pop music has had its share of bands with siblings: Gallaghers, Finns, Carpenters, Davies, Wilsons (some with heart and some with surf), Isleys, Warhursts…..
     
    Then there’s the Mael men!!!!!
     
    Welcome to episode 135 of Love That Album podcast.
     
    Sparks, (ostensibly, Ron and Russell Mael) are that rare beast that are hugely identifiable despite having changed styles (and record companies) several times. By the time they released album number 11, “Angst In My Pants” in 1982, they’d experimented with rock, prog, euro-disco, pop….and they still had many albums and styles to go. Yet, when you hear a Sparks song, there's that "something" that makes you sure it's them.
     
    I am honoured to be joined by music and film writers, Heather Drain and Mike McPadden to discuss “Angst” as well as related peripheral topics. The album is loaded with jerky new-wave era pop. Like its title, much of the album sounds musically nervous and this is reflected in many of the record’s songs. Join us as we talk about cigarettes with human traits, Stars on 45, humour in music without being comedic, fragile masculinity,  taking the Mickey, anxiety, and (of course) hiding public erections….amongst several other tasteful topics. I also make a production comparison that I hope Heather will forgive me for……..
     
    Having Heather and Mike on the show was a joy. They brought so much insight, and I look forward to further shows with them.
     
    Go to Heather’s website at www.mondoheather.com to get links to her essays and podcast appearances, or to order her latest brilliant book, The Bizarro Encyclopedia of Film Vol.1
     
    Mike is also keeping busy with 3 (count ‘em) excellent film podcasts on the go. Subscribe to 70 Movies We Saw In The 70s, Crackpot Cinema and Busted Guts: Cracking Open Comedy Cinema, and keep your film-loving earholes happy. You can also order his latest book Teen Movie Hell from https://www.teenmoviehell.com/
     
    Download this episode of LTA from Spotify, Stitcher or iTunes (search for “Love That Album podcast”). Love That Album is proudly part of the Pantheon Podcast network. Go to Pantheon Podcasts to check out all their great shows.

    You can send me feedback at rrrkitchen@yahoo.com.au (written or mp3 voicemail) or join the Facebook group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/lovethatalbum.

    If you’d consider writing an iTunes review we’d be immensely grateful. However, it’d be even better if you told a friend about the podcast and Pantheon – at a (socially distanced) barbecue, over coffee (on Skype), on social media….whatever way you choose, consider me grateful.

    • 1 hr 41 min
    Pentangle "Basket of Light"

    Pentangle "Basket of Light"

    When we think of music coming out of England in the 1960s, it's often in relation to the Mersey Beat, psychedelia, prog rock, or The Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band. England was also going through a folk music revival in a different way to the American one in the early sixties thanks to a number of artists who saw fit to combine the traditional songs of generations gone with a contemporary approach.

    Welcome to episode 134 of Love That Album podcast.

    I am joined once again, by blues guitarist and vocalist, Shane Pacey, to discuss the third album from English band Pentangle, Basket of Light, released in 1969. There were other great bands like Steeleye Span and Fairport Convention that were finding ways of mixing folk with rock. Pentangle had a jazz rhythm section, a guitarist in the blues tradition, a guitarist trained classically, and a singer who leaned in both a blues and folk direction. Recipe for chaos? Nope, because these were all seasoned musicians who knew how to blend their skills into a common vision.

    Shane and I talk about our earliest memories of the band, the individual members' other projects, and a whole mess of other related topics, while hopefully convincing you that Basket of Light is one of the great albums deserving of your attention.

    BUT WAIT...there's more.

    I spoke with British jazz flautist, Rowland Sutherland who'd been invited by the London Jazz Festival in 2019 to assemble a band and play Basket Of Light live in its entirety as a tribute to the album's 50th anniversary. We discussed Rowland's background, his other projects, and how he came to arrange these beloved Pentangle tunes

    Once again, I am grateful to have Shane bring his knowledge and conversation to the show....LTA is all the better for his participation. Having Rowland talk about a project so near to his heart was an absolute treat. My gratitude to him as well for his time and insight.

    You can find Rowland's music and links to his recordings at http://www.rowlandsutherland.com/

    Please explore the music of Shane at both https://bondicigars.com/ and https://shanepaceytrio.com.au/

    Download this episode of LTA from Spotify, Stitcher or iTunes (search for “Love That Album podcast”). Love That Album is proudly part of the Pantheon Podcast network. Go to http://pantheonpodcasts.com/ to check out all their great shows.

    You can send me feedback at rrrkitchen@yahoo.com.au (written or mp3 voicemail) or join the Facebook group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/lovethatalbum.

    If you’d consider writing an iTunes review we’d be immensely grateful. However, it’d be even better if you told a friend about the podcast and Pantheon – at a (socially distanced) barbecue, over coffee (on Skype), on social media….whatever way you choose, consider me grateful.

    • 2 hrs 20 min
    A Pantheonistic Collection of Favourite Live Albums

    A Pantheonistic Collection of Favourite Live Albums

    Music fans generally agree that the experience of seeing musicians perform live can be the greatest experience music can offer. The way the members of an orchestra or a band can play off each other and feed off an audience's enthusiasm often results in an experience one can remember for life.

    The problem is that all too often that energy doesn't get translated as a recording....the moment has been and gone, and we're left with an album that doesn't bring out the experience for those at the show (and often includes the cheating that often goes on with post production).

    Welcome to episode 133 of Love That Album podcast.

    (Maybe) I'm amazed that I've never done a show devoted to favourite live records....the ones that DO give some idea of what it was like to be there on the night. I put out the call to the other podcasters in the Pantheon Network and asked if anyone wanted to talk to me about their favourite live albums. As it turns out, I had to push back to a couple of shows to another date....such was the great response that I received.

    Tune in and find out what the following people had to say about a favourite nominated live record:

    Peter Ferioli (conspirator behind Pantheon and future host of a show I'll let him reveal)
    Ty Lisson (host of The Band: A History)
    Joe Wroblewski and Ryan Dixon (hosts of Highway Hi Fi)
    Christian Swain (host of Rock and Roll Archaeology and Deeper Digs In Rock)
    Markus Goldman (co-host of The Imbalanced History of Rock and Roll)
    Brad Page (host of I'm In Love With That Song)

    I spoke with the hosts individually about their picks and was able to get to the crux of what they appreciated in a live album and their picks in particular.

    My huge thanks and gratitude to these wonderful people for their time and discussion.

    You can download this episode of LTA from Spotify, Stitcher or iTunes (search for “Love That Album podcast”). Love That Album is proudly part of the Pantheon Podcast network. Go to http://pantheonpodcasts.com/ to check out all their great shows.


    You can send me feedback at rrrkitchen@yahoo.com.au (written or mp3 voicemail) or join the Facebook group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/lovethatalbum.

    If you’d consider writing an iTunes review we’d be immensely grateful. However, it’d be even better if you told a friend about the podcast and Pantheon – at a (socially distanced) barbecue, over coffee (on Skype), on social media….whatever way you choose, consider me grateful.

    • 2 hrs 19 min

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