108 episodes

True Crime Conversations explores the world's most notorious crimes by speaking to the people who know the most about them. Hosted by Jessie Stephens. 

True Crime Conversations Mamamia

    • True Crime
    • 4.4 • 64 Ratings

True Crime Conversations explores the world's most notorious crimes by speaking to the people who know the most about them. Hosted by Jessie Stephens. 

    Finding Cleo: The Story Of A Lost Child

    Finding Cleo: The Story Of A Lost Child

    On today’s episode Jessie is speaking with award-winning investigative journalist Connie Walker, whose podcast ‘Stolen’ & ‘Missing & Murdered’ uncovers an overlooked epidemic of violence against Indigenous women and girls in North America. 

    Her ‘Finding Cleo’ series tells the story of the young Cree girl who was taken from her family by child welfare workers in Saskatchewan in the 1970s, and unearths what truly happened to her...

    CREDITS

    Guest: Carrie Walker 

    Host: Jessie Stephens

    Producer: Gia Moylan

    Audio Producer: Ian Camilleri

    CONTACT US

    Tell us what you think of the show via email at truecrime@mamamia.com.au  

    Join our closed Facebook community to discuss this episode. Just search True Crime Conversations on Facebook or follow this link https://bit.ly/tcc-group 

    If any of the contents in this episode have caused distress, know that there is help available via Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 39 min
    The Dunblane Massacre: Britain's Deadliest Mass Shooting

    The Dunblane Massacre: Britain's Deadliest Mass Shooting

    It’s a Wednesday morning in March 1996, and the bell sounds at Dunblane Primary School near Stirling in Scotland. 

    Students scramble to their classrooms, their minds are caught up in homework and friendships, and the game they were just playing in the yard. 

    A class of twenty-eight Primary 1 pupils, aged between four and six, congregate in the gymnasium, preparing for their morning PE lesson. 

    In a nearby classroom sits an eight-year-old boy whose name is Andy. He has blue eyes and sandy coloured hair and loves nothing more than tennis. On the weekends, he plays adults. Sometimes he even beats them. Today, he is known as Andy Murray, one of the greatest tennis players to have ever lived. 

    It’s just after 9:30am when eight-year-old Andy hears something.

    Two gunshots just outside his classroom. 

    They sound like they’re coming from the gymnasium.

    The man holding the gun has on him 743 cartridges of ammunition. He’s already cut cables at the bottom of a telegraph pole at the school’s entrance and he’s about to execute the deadliest mass shooting in British history.

    25 years later the question remains: why?

    Who was this man, armed with more weapons than anyone could ever need, marching into a local primary school?

    And is there a world in which this massacre could have been prevented?

     

    CREDITS

    Guest: Christopher Berry-Dee

    Host: Jessie Stephens

    Producer: Gia Moylan

    Audio Producer: Ian Camilleri

    RESOURCES WE USED:

    Andy Murray: The Man Behind the Racquet

    Judy Murray | THE DUNBLANE MASSACRE | Driving Force

    CONTACT US

    Tell us what you think of the show via email at truecrime@mamamia.com.au  

    Join our closed Facebook community to discuss this episode. Just search True Crime Conversations on Facebook or follow this link https://bit.ly/tcc-group 

    If any of the contents in this episode have caused distress, know that there is help available via Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 26 min
    The Belrose Bomb

    The Belrose Bomb

    It’s June 15, 1998, a cool winter’s evening on Sydney’s northern beaches.  

    The leafy, quiet and friendly suburb of Belrose is located about 19 kilometres northeast of Sydney’s CBD. For a man named Brett Boyd, it's no accident he lived there. 

    The 27-year-old had moved away from the bustling nightlife of Kings Cross. His friends were involved heavily in the club scene - some dealing drugs like cocaine. Elements of the work had begun to scare him, and so he retreated to a suburb where he felt safe. 

    Arriving home on that Monday in June at about 6:30pm, Brett noticed a package waiting at the door. It was addressed to his girlfriend, 23-year-old bikini model Simone Cheung. They’d met through a mutual friend and had been dating for a few years. 

    Simone wasn’t home at the time, and so Brett instinctively picked the package up. 

    A neighbour would later report hearing a loud explosion. The kind of sound that stood out. They then saw Boyd walk from his doorstep on Opala St, before collapsing.

    An explosion had broken windows and blasted holes through the carport. Debris even landed on the roof of the shed next door. 

    What Brett had picked up was a bomb designed to kill. 

    But who had left it there? And why was it addressed to his girlfriend? 

    When Brett woke up in hospital, he was convinced he knew. 

    CREDITS

    Guest: Poppy Damon and Alice Fiennes

    Host: Jessie Stephens

    Producer: Gia Moylan

    Audio Producer: Ian Camilleri

    RESOURCES WE USED:

    Former fugitive breaks silence 17 years after accused of notorious hate crime | 60 Minutes Australia

    CONTACT US

    Tell us what you think of the show via email at truecrime@mamamia.com.au  

    Join our closed Facebook community to discuss this episode. Just search True Crime Conversations on Facebook or follow this link https://bit.ly/tcc-group 

    If any of the contents in this episode have caused distress, know that there is help available via Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 23 min
    Introducing Extraordinary Stories: Belle Gibson

    Introducing Extraordinary Stories: Belle Gibson

    We’re popping into your feed to share with you our new episode of Extraordinary Stories: Belle Gibson. Episodes two and three of Extraordinary Stories; Belle Gibson are available exclusively to MPlus members.


    To become a member and listen to the full series right now, head to www.mamamia.com.au/podcasts/extraordinary-stories/

    Belle Gibson fooled not only her hundreds of thousands of followers, but the most prestigious book publishers in Australia, the tech giants of silicon valley, and even her family and friends into believing she was something she was not: sick. If today, her name is synonymous with the weighty infamy of a notorious scam, there was a time before that, when she was celebrated as an inspiration. On this episode of Extraordinary Stories, we look at the rise of Belle Gibson. From tall tales in school drama classes to international acclaim and influence, how did Annabelle Natalie Gibson become the pinup girl for the wellness movement?


    THE END BITS:
    With thanks to Bronwyn McCahon, Doctor Brad McKay, and Kylie Willey 


    RESOURCES WE USED:
    The Woman Who Fooled The World by Beau Donnelly and Nick Toscano 
    Fake Medicine by Brad Mckay
    The Girl Who Conned Us All by Clair Weaver https://www.nowtolove.com.au/news/real-life/belle-gibson-the-whole-story-10129
    https://www.nowtolove.com.au/news/local-news/belle-gibson-speaks-for-the-first-time-since-her-whole-pantry-controversy-13532 
    With thanks to Tara Brown from 60 Minutes 


    GET IN TOUCH:
    Feedback? We’re listening! Call the pod phone on 02 8999 9386 or email us at podcast@mamamia.com.au
    Need more info and inspo in your ears? Find more Mamamia podcasts here... https://www.mamamia.com.au/podcasts/


    CREDITS:
    Host: Emma Gillespie
    Writers: Emma Gillespie and Holly Wainwright
    Producers: Melanie Sauer and Emma Gillespie
    Audio Production: Elissa Ratliff and Madeline Joannou
    Executive Producer: Holly Wainwright and Elissa Ratliff


    Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present, and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 31 min
    Buried Without A Body: The Murder Of Helen McCourt

    Buried Without A Body: The Murder Of Helen McCourt

    It’s 4pm on the 9th of February, 1988. 

    A 22-year-old woman named Helen McCourt, with long, dark brown hair picks up the phone.

    She's about to leave work at the Royal Insurance office in Liverpool, having negotiated with her boss to leave an hour early. 

    Helen is ringing her mother, Marie. She tells her that tonight she’ll be going out with her new boyfriend, but asks that her mother have tea ready when she arrives home so she’ll have enough time to wash her hair. 

    Marie agrees. Sitting with her daughter Helen and discussing her work or her relationships or her friendships are among one of her favourite things to do.

    Once Helen puts down the receiver, she walks out into the wintery afternoon. It's raining, with fierce gusts of winds, as is often the case in northern England. In just a few hours, the temperature will be near freezing. 

    Helen estimates it will take her about an hour and fifteen minutes to arrive home, which she shares with her mother and younger brother in Standish Avenue. 

    But 5:30pm comes and goes. Helen’s tea goes cold. Her mother looks out the window at the foul weather making the streets unbearable. 

    Where is Helen?

    And how close has she come that evening to opening the front door?

     

    CREDITS

    Guest: Marie McCourt

    Host: Jessie Stephens

    Producer: Gia Moylan

    Audio Producer: Ian Camilleri

     

    CONTACT US

    Tell us what you think of the show via email at truecrime@mamamia.com.au  

    Join our closed Facebook community to discuss this episode. Just search True Crime Conversations on Facebook or follow this link https://bit.ly/tcc-group 

    If any of the contents in this episode have caused distress, know that there is help available via Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 26 min
    The Husband Poisoner

    The Husband Poisoner

    For Desmond Butler, it began with a headache. Then diarrhoea. Nausea that felt like a hangover.  

    He was otherwise a healthy man, not yet 30. He shared two children with his wife Yvonne Gladys Butler, a striking woman, small and doll-like. Desmond also attracted the attention of neighbours, with dark, thick floppy hair, an athletic physique and perhaps a wandering eye. 

    It was October 1947, and the young couple lived in a small house in the then working-class suburb of Newtown in Sydney. 

    But back to Desmond’s headaches. 

    Over the course of a week, his symptoms worsened. 

    Extreme fatigue. Aches and pains throughout his whole body, and a strange stiffness in his legs. Pins and needles travelled to his feet. 

    Before long, Desmond saw a doctor. They could find nothing, physically, wrong with him. The doctor’s order was Bonox… a drink otherwise known as beef tea. It was gentle on the stomach and high in iron, concentrating also the nutrients from beef in a drink. Every night, Yvonne continued to serve him Bonox. But his condition did not improve. It got worse.

    While out with friends one night, Desmond fell to the floor. His legs were no longer working. He shouted at the top of his lungs: “I feel like I’m on fire!” Rushed home and put to bed, his friends didn’t know what to make of Desmond’s mystery illness. Was it possible he was putting it on? 

    As time wore on, neighbours began to notice a smell around the Butler house. It smelt like urine and faeces. Desmond no longer had control of his bowel, and Yvonne could only wash him with a sponge in bed given she was unable to lift him. His screams were heard throughout the neighbourhood - like an animal in excruciating pain. 

    Finally, he was rushed to hospital again.

    A friend explained to the doctor: “He’s in so much pain he’s been threatening to eat poisoned wheat. His wife told us so”.

    He likely didn’t know what the repercussions would be for such a statement. 

    Desmond was not admitted to hospital. He was taken into custody. In 1947, suicide was a crime. And Desmond had just threatened it. 

    And so people believed Desmond Butler had lost his mind - imagining symptoms for which there was no physical explanation. 

    But they were real. 

    And they did have a physical explanation. 

    But by the time police made a startling discovery, it would all be too late.

     

    CREDITS

    Guest: Tanya Bretherton, author of The Husband Poisoner

    Host: Jessie Stephens

    Producer: Gia Moylan

    Audio Producer: Ian Camilleri

     

    CONTACT US

    Tell us what you think of the show via email at truecrime@mamamia.com.au  

    Join our closed Facebook community to discuss this episode. Just search True Crime Conversations on Facebook or follow this link https://bit.ly/tcc-group 

    If any of the contents in this episode have caused distress, know that there is help available via Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

     

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
64 Ratings

64 Ratings

nyalathotep ,

The hosts all sound like smurfs

I don’t understand this not-cute, speaking like a 5 year old valley girl with a creaky larynx regardless of age and nationality thing. It really kills this cast for me.

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