91 episodes

Each fortnight, hosts Lauren and Alicia delve into a ‘deviant’ woman from history, fiction, mythology and the contemporary world: those who aren’t afraid to break the rules, to subvert the system, to explore, to seek and to challenge the status quo.

Deviant Women Lipp Media

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8, 77 Ratings

Each fortnight, hosts Lauren and Alicia delve into a ‘deviant’ woman from history, fiction, mythology and the contemporary world: those who aren’t afraid to break the rules, to subvert the system, to explore, to seek and to challenge the status quo.

    Juana Inés de la Cruz

    Juana Inés de la Cruz

    After a childhood spent buried amongst the texts of her grandfather's library teaching herself Latin and Nahuatl, Greek rhetoric, and philosophy, it's not surprising that the young Juana was considered a prodigy. So much so that, at just fifteen, she found herself lady-in-waiting to the Vicereine, wife of the Viceroy of New Spain. Court life, however, didn't appeal to young Juana, who, sick of rich and drunken bachelors and their flirtatious ways, craved the space and time to dedicate herself to her studies. So, what was she to do? Join the nunnery, of course! Here, she found the scholarly solace she desired. But when the Bishop of Puebla, one of the most influential men of the New World, publically maligned her for daring to think beyond her sphere, Juana penned a manifesto that would become one of the most important proto-feminist texts in the history of the Americas - if not the world.


    Donaway, Elizabeth. A Baroque Drama: Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz’s Crisis in Seventeenth-Century New Spain, 2019. Hanover Univesity. Thesis. https://history.hanover.edu/hhr/19/HHR2019-donaway-sorjuana.pdf
    Merrim, Stephanie. “Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz”. Encyclopædia Britannica, 2020. https://www.britannica.com/biography/Sor-Juana-Ines-de-la-Cruz#ref959
    Merrim, Stephanie, ed. Feminist perspectives on Sor Juana inés de la cruz. Wayne State University Press, 1999.
    Paz, Octavio. Sor Juana, or, the traps of faith. Harvard University Press, 1988.
    Schuessler, Michael. “Reply to Sor Philotea”. Enyclopedia.com, 2019. https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/culture-magazines/reply-sor-philotea


    If you want to support Deviant Women, follow us on: 
    Patreon
    Twitter @DeviantWomen
    Facebook @deviantwomenpodcast
    Instagram @deviantwomenpodcast


    Deviant Women is recorded and produced on the lands of the Kaurna People and we pay respect to Elders past, present and emerging.
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Baba Yaga

    Baba Yaga

    In the deep, dark forests of Russia, where danger lurks in the liminal spaces, you might just find the unusual abode of one of folklore's most fascinating characters: the incomparable Baba Yaga. With her hooked nose, her bedraggled hair and her wrinkled skin, this hag of hags appears in her strange mode of transport, ready to aid or to hinder, depending on how much you keep your wits about you. With roots in the early Slavic pantheon of gods and goddesses, Baba Yaga has changed through the centuries, playing different roles for different listeners, and slowly crystallising into the ultimate fairy tale witch.
    Arm yourself with your magic charms and keep your tongue sharp as we cross the threshold into the domain of talking creatures and mystical powers to stoke the fires and spin a tale or two of Baba Yaga.
      
    Afanasev, Aleksandr. Russian Fairy Tales. Guterman, Norbert (ed.). Pantheon Books, 1973.
    Baba Yaga: The Wild Witch of the East in Russian Fairy Tales. Intro & Trans by Forrester, Sibelan. University of Mississippi Press, 2013.
    Johns, Andreas. Baba Yaga: The Ambiguous Mother and Witch of the Russian Folklore. Peter Lang, 2004.
    Tatar, Maria. Off with Their Heads!: Fairy Tales and the Culture of Childhood. Princeton University Press, 1993.
    Warner, Marina. No Go the Bogeyman: Scaring, Lulling and Making Mock. Vintage Book, 2000.
    Zipes, Jack. The Irresistible Fairy Tale. Princeton University Press, 2012.


    If you want to support Deviant Women, follow us on: 
    Patreon
    Twitter @DeviantWomen
    Facebook @deviantwomenpodcast
    Instagram @deviantwomenpodcast


    Deviant Women is recorded and produced on the lands of the Kaurna People and we pay respect to Elders past, present and emerging.
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 hr 17 min
    Norma Miller

    Norma Miller

    In 1919, into the heart of the burgeoning Harlem Renaissance, Norma Miller was born. As a child, she would watch the likes of Duke Ellington and Ella Fitzgerald play to the hopping crowds of the Savoy Ballroom, the majestic heart of Harlem and the birthplace of swing. At just 12, she was plucked from the street outside its doors and so began a career that would take her around the globe as one of the world's foremost swing dancers - and all before she turned 18. So put on a record and lace up your dancing shoes, because we're swinging out from the sprung-wood floors of the Savoy to the slippery decks of British liners and the beaches of Rio as we follow the life of Norma Miller, Queen of Swing.


    McFadden, Robert D. “Norma Miller, Lindy-Hopping ‘Queen of Swing,’ Is Dead at 99”, New York Times, May 6, 2019, https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/06/obituaries/norma-miller-dead.html
    Miller, Norma. Swingin'at the Savoy: the Memoir of a Jazz Dancer. Temple University Press, 1996.
    Spring, Howard. "Swing and the Lindy Hop: dance, venue, media, and tradition." American Music (1997): 183-207.


    If you want to support Deviant Women, follow us on: 
    Patreon
    Twitter @DeviantWomen
    Facebook @deviantwomenpodcast
    Instagram @deviantwomenpodcast


    Deviant Women is recorded and produced on the lands of the Kaurna People and we pay respect to Elders past, present and emerging.
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 hr 22 min
    Lipp Selects: May Contain Traces Of Soy

    Lipp Selects: May Contain Traces Of Soy

    May Contain Traces Of Soy is a new show on Lipp Media, a network celebrating the voices of women and the LGBTQ+ community. Join host Rochelle Lindquist on her journey down a plant-based path as she pursues a more zero-waste existence.


    In this episode, Rochelle discusses women's health, period stigma and period poverty with Katie Norbury from Share the Dignity and Get Papped. They also discuss the importance of going zero-waste with your monthly flow, getting the fold right with your menstrual cup and the freedom of period pants.


    Listen to May Contain Traces Of Soy wherever you listen to us!
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 29 min
    Faith Bandler

    Faith Bandler

    During the 1960s, the world was in the grip of enormous ideological change. In Australia, there was public outcry against the Vietnam War and growing support for equal pay for women, free education, fair wages, and the abolishment of the White Australia Policy. There was also growing support for radical changes to the rights, or lack thereof, afforded to Indigenous Australians. Helping to drive this movement was a woman who was intimately familiar with what it felt like to face racial discrimination. The daughter of a slave "blackbirded" from the South Sea Islands in the 1880s, Faith Bandler was inspired by the injustices she saw around her to co-found the Aboriginal-Australian Fellowship, and soon began the long fight that would eventually lead to a monumental referendum in 1967. But the referendum was only one part of a bigger whole, and in her latter life, Bandler continued to fight for those who were oppressed, eventually turning her attention towards her cultural roots in Vanuatu.


    Join us as we grab our placards and take to the streets to celebrate Bandler's contribution to the crucial work towards equality that continues in this country today.


    Bandler, Faith, & Fox, Len. The Time Was Ripe: A History of the Aboriginal-Australian Fellowship (1956-69). Alternative Co-operative, 1983.
    Heimans, Frank. Australian Biography. Faith Bandler. National Film and Sound Archive of Australia, 1993. https://www.nfsa.gov.au/collection/curated/australian-biography-faith-bandler-0
    Lake, Marilyn. Faith : Faith Bandler, Gentle Activist. Allen & Unwin, 2002.


    If you want to support Deviant Women, follow us on: 
    Patreon
    Twitter @DeviantWomen
    Facebook @deviantwomenpodcast
    Instagram @deviantwomenpodcast


    Deviant Women is recorded and produced on the lands of the Kaurna People and we pay respect to Elders past, present and emerging.
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 hr 13 min
    Ida B Wells

    Ida B Wells

    Born into The United States' last days of slavery, Ida B. Wells was raised to fight. The daughter of two politically active entrepreneurs, she wanted to raise herself and her siblings into the middle class. But while emancipation may have passed into law, new structural barriers emerged to keep women like Wells out - out of the economy, out of the political system, and out of first class train carriages. When a conductor tried to force Wells into the smoking car on a ride from Memphis to Nashville, Wells took a stand. The event launched a writing and activist career that would see her tackle some of the greatest injustices of her age - and ours. Her reports, Southern Horrors and The Red Record, laid bare the horror of lynchings in the South and she would go on to found a number of Civil Rights organisations - some of which survive today. She was also a suffragist unafraid to call out the movement for its lack of Black representation - an intersectional feminist well before her time!


    DuRocher, Kristina. Ida B. Wells: Social Reformer and Activist. 2017. Routledge Historical Americans.
    Dickerson, Cailtin. “Ida B. Wells: Took on Racism in the Deep South with Powerful Reporting on Lynchings.” New York Times. 9 March 2018. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/obituaries/overlooked-ida-b-wells.html


    Join us to discover more about one of the most influential figures of the Civil Rights Movement, a woman whose work lives on in those continuing the fight for Black Lives Matter today. 


    If you want to support Deviant Women, follow us on: 
    Patreon
    Twitter @DeviantWomen
    Facebook @deviantwomenpodcast
    Instagram @deviantwomenpodcast


    Deviant Women is recorded and produced on the lands of the Kaurna People and we pay respect to Elders past, present and emerging
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 hr 21 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
77 Ratings

77 Ratings

Amanda from LJ ,

Fantastic

Really love these women!

lovefromhawaii ,

Fascinating and novel

I haven’t been able to stop listening. It’s really great to learn about history from a women’s perspective, presented by intelligent and educated hosts. The history that is taught in schools is incredibly one-sided and exclusive to men; inclusive history is something everyone should seek out. I especially enjoy the interpretations and thoughtful inputs given by the hosts. Very glad this exists!

Ravenclawgirl29 ,

Love, love, love

Funny, informative, and witty. Alyssia and Lauren work really well off each other. I do hope they do Joan of Arc some time soon, also, an episode on themselves as deviant women of the 21st century podcasters!

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by Lipp Media