13 episodes

New York, I Love You But You've Changed is a podcast where long time New Yorkers from across the five boroughs give us their version of the city they love, discuss how it has evolved and share their thoughts on what we can do to make the greatest hometown in the world great for all of us. And we also have some fun with the pop culture associated with NYC. Our interviews seek to create an anthology of voices that represents the range of life that exists in New York City, especially those voices who are often left out of the narrative. Your host is Alexis Haut, a former NYC teacher living in Crown Heights. For more about the show, visit our website at www.newyorkilybyc.com or follow us @newyorkilybyc.

New York, I Love You But You've Changed Haut Takes Media

    • Places & Travel
    • 5.0, 22 Ratings

New York, I Love You But You've Changed is a podcast where long time New Yorkers from across the five boroughs give us their version of the city they love, discuss how it has evolved and share their thoughts on what we can do to make the greatest hometown in the world great for all of us. And we also have some fun with the pop culture associated with NYC. Our interviews seek to create an anthology of voices that represents the range of life that exists in New York City, especially those voices who are often left out of the narrative. Your host is Alexis Haut, a former NYC teacher living in Crown Heights. For more about the show, visit our website at www.newyorkilybyc.com or follow us @newyorkilybyc.

    Appropriate

    Appropriate

    Alexis won an award! The pilot episode of her show, Appropriate:Stories from the grey area of consuming culture was award BRIC Media Arts 2019 B Spoke award- recognizing a show that pushes the boundaries of free speech in podcasting. In this episode she examines her relationship to hip hop and attempts to answer the following questions:Why do so many white people like Chance the Rapper? Why were there so many of us at his concert? Why are there so many of us at rap concerts in general? Why do so many white people listen to rap music? Have we always listened to rap music or is this some sort of new thing? Am I overthinking this? Do I overthink everything? Is it even a big deal that we listen to rap music? And what’s up with the WAY we listen to rap music? Spoiler alert: she doesn't come up with any final answers, but she sure tries. Tune in to hear Alexis examine her own relationship with rap music with NYILYBYC favorite Ruth, as well as her conversations with poet and cultural critic Hanif Abdurraqib, Refinery 29's Connie Wang, The Wing's Yari Blanco and others. More episodes to come!

    Wing on Wo & Co, Part II: Find Mei on Mott Street

    Wing on Wo & Co, Part II: Find Mei on Mott Street

    In part II of our final episode, we return to Wing on Wo & Co, the oldest continuously operating store in Manhattan's Chinatown to sit down with Mei Lum- the store's fifth generation owner. She explains what informed her decision in 2016 at the age of 26 to defer her acceptance to grad school at Columbia and assume ownership of the store. And also how that ownership has informed the development of the W.O.W project (https://www.wingonwoand.co/aboutwowproject), her non profit whose mission is to sustain ownership over Chinatown's future by growing, protecting and preserving Chinatown's creative culture through arts and activism. Mei and Alexis also dig into how Chinese culture is often appropriated, and Mei drafts a response to an inappropriate Instagram post. She also fills us in on the history Chinatown holds, the challenges it faces and her (cautious) vision for her store, her project and her neighborhood. You can stop by W.O.W (26 Mott Street) any day of the week between 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. And to learn more about the store's history, visit their website (https://www.wingonwoand.co/) and listen to the Prelude to the End: Alexis Says Goodbye to NewYorkILYBYC.

    Wing on Wo & Co, Part I: Gary Offers Us His Wisdom

    Wing on Wo & Co, Part I: Gary Offers Us His Wisdom

    Gary Lum is the steward, guardian and current shopkeeper of Wing on Wo & Co, the oldest continuously operating store in Manhattan's Chinatown. Wing on Wo has been at its current location, 26 Mott Street, since 1925 and sells consciously chosen Chinese porcelain. Wing on Wo is a family business and is truly one of the most special spaces in our city. The Lum’s story of tenacity, legacy and loyalty is New York City at its very best. There couldn't be a more fitting interview to close this series with. In part I, Gary shares the beauties and challenges of growing up as the American born son of Chinese Immigrants in the Chinatown of the 1960s and 70s. He definitely knows the neighborhood has changed but he discusses how he manages to work within it. He also talks about the complex roles Stuyvesant High School and the Jersey Shore played in his life and why he tries to cultivate genuine connections with his customers.And most importantly, Gary gives some insight into how raising his two awesome daughters, Mei and Lina, empowered him to correct the lasting effects of a childhood he considered less than ideal. To hear more about the history of the store and some other lessons Gary taught Alexis, tune into the Prelude to the End: Alexis Says Goodbye to NewYorkILYBYC and visit our website (http://www.newyorkilybyc.com).

    Prelude to the End: Alexis Says Goodbye to NewYorkILYBYC

    Prelude to the End: Alexis Says Goodbye to NewYorkILYBYC

    Tomorrow, the last episode of New York, I Love You But You've Changed will air in two parts. Part one will feature an interview with Gary Lum, the steward, guardian and current shopkeeper at Wing on Wo & Co- the oldest continuously running store in Manhattan's Chinatown. Part two features an interview with Gary's daughter, Mei Lum- the fifth generation owner of her family's store. As a prelude to this final episode, Alexis shares what making this show has taught her (people don't like to answer emails/ capturing perfect audio is really hard!), why she's stopping (something new is coming!), what New York City really means to her (pretty much everything!) and the best trains to cry on (the Q-duh!). Plus you will hear some audio clips of wisdom Gary shared about the experience of being a guest on a show like this. Tune in, read the text on our website (http://www.newyorkilybyc.com) and we will see you on Thursday. XOXO

    Joe Talks Judaism

    Joe Talks Judaism

    From Seinfeld to bagels with lox, New York City has been anointed the pinnacle of American Jewish culture. But what does that actually mean? Is there a difference between being Jewish by culture and Jewish by religion? And do all of NYC’s Jewish residents access their religion and their city in the same way? Judaism in NYC is at once both highly visible and highly misunderstood. In this week’s episode we attempt to answer those questions and clear up some misunderstandings along the way. We talk to Joe, a lifelong New Yorker who grew up in an Orthodox Jewish community in Kew Gardens Hills, Queens. He names and delineates the differences between the denominations of Judaism that exist in New York City, shoots down a few myths and shares some things about his past and current relationship with the religion. Along the way we learn about the Orthodox Jewish version of dating "apps", gender roles within different Jewish communities, how secular folks react when they learn that eating Kosher means never tasting bacon and why 54% of Orthodox Jews voted for T***P. You’ll learn a lot, and have a few laughs along the way. As always, you can find links to everything we referenced in this episode on our website (newyorkilybyc.com).

    These Kids Are Way More Than Alright

    These Kids Are Way More Than Alright

    Kya and Jonah are two 12 year old Brooklynites with a lot to say, and on this week's episode of NewYorkILYBYC they say a lot. They took some time out of their busy school day to share with Alexis their thoughts on the peaks and valleys of growing up as kids of color in 2018 Brooklyn. They give their take on local issues including gang participation, police brutality, racial profiling in retail, and the borough's drop out rates while making connections to national themes like our current president, the real value of the Obama presidency, mass incarceration, the Bill Cosby verdict and the legacy of slavery in housing, the workforce and politics. Their opinions are unique and provocative (they also DEFINITELY don't always agree with each other), and they bravely share some things about their own lives along the way. They also give us the dish on Snapchat, the music the cool kids are listening to, the best things to do during the summer in BK (ever heard of Links?) and where we should eat when we are done doing those things. Kya and Jonah hold nothing back, and give us a lot to think about. As always, you can find links to everything we referenced in this episode on our website (http://www.newyorkilybyc.com).

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

scottsparks ,

Amusing, Intimate Takes On Changing NYC Culture

Somehow simultaneously takes tackles the culture & potential issues associated with NYC past, present & future while also keeping things lighthearted, fun & so interesting. Just like New York, there’s no chance you won’t relate to at least a piece of this podcast & the surprising, diverse conversations had on it. Highly recommend - esp. for any Still Processing fanatics out there (like me)!

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