77 episodes

Join beauty writer Gemma Watts in conversation with some of Australia's, and the world's, biggest beauty pioneers. We're picking the brains behind the beauty products that fill your bathroom cupboards- the CEOs, founders and creative minds heading the brands that shape the beauty industry. From cult favourites to the products you reach for every day, from young entrepreneurs to companies steeped in history, these are the stories behind the most successful beauty businesses on the planet.

Glow Journa‪l‬ Gemma Watts

    • Fashion & Beauty
    • 4.5 • 10 Ratings

Join beauty writer Gemma Watts in conversation with some of Australia's, and the world's, biggest beauty pioneers. We're picking the brains behind the beauty products that fill your bathroom cupboards- the CEOs, founders and creative minds heading the brands that shape the beauty industry. From cult favourites to the products you reach for every day, from young entrepreneurs to companies steeped in history, these are the stories behind the most successful beauty businesses on the planet.

    Indie Lee | Founder and CEO of Indie Lee

    Indie Lee | Founder and CEO of Indie Lee

    In episode sixty one of the Glow Journal podcast, host Gemma Watts talks to the founder and CEO of Indie Lee, Indie Lee.


    Indie Lee grew up with a clear vision, a literal checklist, of how she wanted her life to look- two children, two yellow labradors, a beautiful home and fast-paced corporate job. She had ticked every one of those boxes before realising that she was, in her own words, “a passenger of her own life,” checking boxes rather than living. 


    Indie decided to take a step back and leave work to spend more time with her children, but being a classic Type A, her idea of slowing down somehow led to her working in AND BUILDING a 750 square foot greenhouse. In summer 2008, Indie was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, meaning she could no longer work in her beloved greenhouse. She was dealt another blow later that year, in the form of a brain tumour, with one doctor telling her she had just 6 months to live. 


    “When you’re given six months to live, you decide how you want to live your life,” Indie tells me, so she revisited her passion for nature and set to work on her brand, Indie Lee. Indie’s tumour was successfully removed on April 22nd 2009, Earth Day, a day Indie describes as her rebirth. By the end of that year, Indie had officially launched her brand. Today, over 10 years on, that brand is sold all over the world. 


    In this conversation, Indie and I discuss her belief in karma and how she refused to enter surgery with any loose ends, how it feels to be forced to step away from something you deeply love, and her surprising first request when she came out of her operation. 


    You can read this interview now at glowjournal.com
    Follow Indie Lee on Instagram at @indie_lee


    Stay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at hello@gemkwatts.com
     
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    • 54 min
    BONUS | Capillaries and Spider Veins with Dr Deshan Sebaratnam

    BONUS | Capillaries and Spider Veins with Dr Deshan Sebaratnam

    Is it possible to fade visible capillaries with topical skincare? Why do spider veins appear so much worse during pregnancy? Are they hereditary? Is there a way to erase broken and burst capillaries- and do either of these things even exist?!


    In this special bonus Ask An Expert episode I’m joined by Dr Deshan Sebaratnam. A Fellow of the Australasian College of Dermatologists, Dr Deshan holds an academic appointment as Conjoint Senior Lecturer with the University of New South Wales, has presented his research internationally and has had his research published in both local and international medical journals. With experience and an interest in all facets of dermatology including medical, surgical, cosmetic and paediatric, I felt that Dr Deshan was the ideal doctor to objectively answer YOUR questions on visible and dilated capillaries and spider veins.  


    Away from our regular brand founder conversations, I am asked so many highly specific questions about the skin. Given that I am an educated consumer and by no means an expert, it would be extremely unethical for me to even attempt to address your skin concerns which is why I insist on taking those questions to a medical doctor. This Ask An Expert series is giving you, the Glow Journal audience, unprecedented access to medical doctors, professors and dermatologists and, while the series is sponsored by Candela Medical, doctors legally and ethically have to remain completely objective in interviews like this. For this reason, this series is giving you, the listeners, completely unbiased expert answers to your most specific skin questions- questions that I cannot answer myself. 


    In this episode, we’ve taken the questions YOU submitted on capillaries and spider veins to Dr Deshan - from the myth that is “broken” capillaries and if topical skincare can actually do anything to make them disappear, to whether or not spider veins are hereditary and why pregnancy seems to make them so much more apparent. 


    You can read this interview now at: glowjournal.com/ask-an-expert-capillaries-and-spider-veins


    Follow Candela Medical on Instagram @candelamedicalanz
    Follow Dr Deshan Sebaratnam (and check out the videos mentioned in this episode) @dr.deshan
    Discover more at candelamedia.com


    Stay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at hello@gemkwatts.com
     
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    • 28 min
    Amanda Chantal Bacon | Founder and CEO of Moon Juice

    Amanda Chantal Bacon | Founder and CEO of Moon Juice

    In episode sixty of the Glow Journal podcast, host Gemma Watts talks to the founder and CEO of Moon Juice, Amanda Chantal Bacon. 


    Amanda Chantal Bacon has known she had purpose since she was a child- it just took her some time to really hone in on what, exactly, that purpose was. 


    She’s lived a few different lives. She grew up around fashion, something she felt disillusioned by, and was diagnosed with a chronic illness around the age of 5- the repercussions of which she was still feeling well into her 20s. She lived in New Zealand, Italy, Argentina and her native United States, working as a teacher, a writer and a chef. 


    It was while she was working in the fine dining space that her autoimmune condition was as its worst, so she took some time out to revisit what she knew as a child- that she had purpose, she just needed to find out what it was.


    Amanda embarked on something of a “wellness” journey, and in 2011 Moon Juice was born- a business that began as a juice bar in Venice, California (before words like “organic,” “raw” and “cold pressed” were a part of global vernacular) but soon became more of an immersive wellness brand, producing and selling supplements, foods and the now iconic “dusts” that consumers could take home and work into their own routine. 


    Amanda had never, ever considered entering the beauty space with Moon Juice, despite its growing link to the wellness industry. What prompted her to rethink that stance was a beauty-editor-approved, cult skincare product that had visible benefits for Amanda’s skin, but would’ve flared up her autoimmune condition with repeat use. The solution, it seemed, was to develop a clean alternative, and in 2018 Moon Juice’s skincare line was created.


    In this conversation, Amanda shares how a 2015 viral story online saw her ridiculed globally and, in turn, her business boom, the value in slipping behind the scenes of your company, and how a Chinese Soup served as the inspiration for one of her brand’s most popular skin serums.


    Read more at glowjournal.com
    Follow Moon Juice on Instagram at @moonjuice


    Stay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at hello@gemkwatts.com
     
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    • 1 hr 4 min
    Charlotte Knight | Founder and CEO of Ciaté London

    Charlotte Knight | Founder and CEO of Ciaté London

    In episode fifty nine of the Glow Journal podcast, host Gemma Watts talks to the founder and CEO of Ciaté London, Charlotte Knight. 


    At 21, Charlotte Knight moved from London to Dublin and, with little experience in nails and no experience in business ownership, opened Dublin’s first ever nail bar- she went into a hair salon for a blow dry, mentioned her idea to the owner, and came out with a business plan. 


    People travelled across the country just to see Charlotte, with the young entrepreneur and manicurist soon finding herself in demand backstage at London, New York and Paris Fashion Weeks and on photoshoots as a session nail technician. It was during this time, as a session artist, that Charlotte first began sketching that now iconic little black bow-adorned bottle, mixing colours, and dreaming of what would become Ciaté London. 


    Ciaté launched in 2009, landing in stores at the height of world’s nail art movement, but it was in 2012, when the brand released its Caviar nails collection, that things changed almost overnight. Prior to the launch of Caviar, Ciaté had 4 staff and were stocked in about 50 stores. Post Caviar, the brand found themselves in over 4000 stores across 35 countries. 


    Nail art and, more specifically, the home manicure trend had hit fever pitch but, given the cyclical nature of the beauty industry, global nail polish sales crashed a mere two and half years after that launch. Armed with data, a plan, and one of the most creative business minds I’ve ever come across, Charlotte spearheaded the launch of an entirely new product skew for Ciaté London- makeup. 


    Today, Ciaté is one of the most celebrated brands in the world across both nails and makeup, and this year will see the brand release not one but two high profile collaborations, both of which Charlotte offered up a few big clues about during our chat. 


    In this conversation, Charlotte and I discuss the expectations and subsequent pressure that comes with releasing multiple global first-to-markets, how showing a boardroom the colour of her knickers led to one of her brand’s many successful launches, and why we shouldn’t expect a Carol Baskin for Ciaté collection anytime soon.  


    You can read this interview now at glowjournal.com
    Follow Ciaté London on Instagram at @ciatelondon


    Stay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at hello@gemkwatts.com
     
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    • 1 hr 11 min
    Maeva Heim | Founder and CEO of Bread Beauty Supply

    Maeva Heim | Founder and CEO of Bread Beauty Supply

    In episode fifty eight of the Glow Journal podcast, host Gemma Watts talks to the founder and CEO of Bread Beauty Supply, Maeva Heim. 


    “Visibility” is a word that came up a few times during this particular conversation with Maeva. Maeva explains that her relationship with her own hair was largely influenced by visibility. Maeva had spent the bulk of 20 years using a chemical hair relaxer to straighten out the natural texture of her hair, explaining that the bulk of the hair education we receive in mainstream culture is designed for straight hair. It wasn’t until a trip to the US, during which her hair relaxer exploded in her luggage, that she decided to move back towards her natural hair texture. She wasn’t alone in embracing what’s called the “natural hair movement,”- at that time, there’d been over a 40% decline in hair relaxer sales over a five year period. 


    A simple, effective, modern beauty offering for women of colour wasn’t particularly visible either. In a time that Maeva has coined “pre-Fenty,” there were even fewer brands catering to woman of colour than there are now- and there were absolutely no simple, effective, fun nor modern options in the haircare category. 


    Confident in her idea to simplify wash day for women with textured hair, Bread Beauty Supply was born- a now six month old, award winning brand that launched into US Sephora, making it only the eighth black-owned beauty brand to be picked up by Sephora, and just the third in the hair space. It was during the development process that Maeva made visibility work to her advantage. She explains the exposure we have to other founder stories online today meant that she felt she could do it too, without fear- and that’s exactly what she’s done. 
     
    In this conversation, Maeva and I discuss how she secured investment from the same fund who invested in Emily Weiss’ Glossier and Kim Kardashian’s Skims, the challenges of launching a brand through an overseas retailer in 2020, and the makeup look her aunt in West Africa bestowed on her in childhood that may well be making a comeback. 


    You can read this interview now at glowjournal.com
    Follow Bread on Instagram at @breadbeautysupply


    Stay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at hello@gemkwatts.com
     
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    • 59 min
    Ere Perez | Founder of Ere Perez

    Ere Perez | Founder of Ere Perez

    In episode fifty seven of the Glow Journal podcast, host Gemma Watts talks to Ere Perez, founder of her namesake brand.


    Ere was born in Mexico and grew up watching her mother and grandparents mix lotions and potions in their kitchen. Ere is passionate about healing, and after studying nutrition she fell in love and moved to Australia in 1999 to be with her now husband. Ere had always loved mascara, as she explains to me the only real difference between Mickey and Minnie is eyelashes, but quickly noticed a gap for a great natural mascara, or really any natural colour cosmetics, here in Australia. From there, with next to no budget, she set to work on the first iteration of her own mascara, and soon thereafter Ere Perez cosmetics was born- a brand that Ere grew piece by piece and now has offices in two continents and is stocked in over 30 countries.


    This conversation was pure joy from start to finish, one of those chats where you get a pain in your jaw by the end of it from grinning for too long, which is precisely the energy take well into the summer break. Ere tells me in this episode that “The human body is the most perfect thing in the world,” and that we’re “made so beautifully,” and I think that is the perfect note to end this season on.


    On that note and in news that will shock literally everyone who knows me, I am actually allowing myself time off for the holidays this year, but we will be back to open Season 3 on January 20. 


    In this conversation, Ere shares why putting truth and your heart into your work really is the most important thing a person can do, how she physically managed to get her business off the ground with one product and no budget almost 20 years ago, and how missing out on a parking space some decades ago may well have changed the course of her entire life. 


    You can read this interview now at glowjournal.com
    Follow Ere Perez on Instagram at @ereperezcosmetics


    Stay up to date with Gemma on Instagram at @gemkwatts and @glow.journal, or get in touch at hello@gemkwatts.com
     
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    • 1 hr 35 min

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