39 min

#7 Gillian Tett: Tunnel Vision and Tribal Illusions 52 Insights Podcast

    • Society & Culture

With our society changing so rapidly in so many ways, how do we deal with the consistent disruption that plagues us? In an ideal world, we would possess inner tools such as slowing down and breathing, listening to others, and harnessing the power of empathy to move with the times.But in times of turbulence, it always comes as no surprise that we cling to the things we know. It's where we feel most comfortable. 
As someone who spends her days observing these disruptive forces in the world of finance and business, no one is better suited to think about how we respond than the editor at large of the Financial Times and renowned columnist and author Gillian Tett. Tett is uniquely suited to these times. Someone who possesses a coherent understanding of what makes us who we are. Her formative years were spent on the ground in Tajikistan studying wedding rituals. Then, in 2003 she made the unorthodox leap to a world full of opaque systems and middle-aged white men.

In 2007, she raised the alarm bells about the impending 2008 financial doom that was to roll through us; the rest, as we know, is history. Whilst we're still experiencing the ethical and moral fallout of that time, I sat down with Gillian to find out where we are today. Her new book Anthorvision deals with all manners of political, financial, technological and cultural changes. How we impose these on others, and how do we make meaning from these changes.

From her apartment in New York apartment, she gives us a unique insiders view of the modern world. One where bitcoin is on pace to replace fiat currency, where tunnel vision and tribal illusions are destroying the fabric of our society and where the world's power rests at the hands of the geeks and technologists.

She assures us we need to think more like amateur anthropologists instead of putting our needs first, looking out the window and seeing how the other side lives. It might sound like a simple sentiment, but it's one worth being reminded of over and over. I hope you find this human exchange as uniquely helpful as I did.

More info here:
Internet Engineering Task Force

Gillian Tett's book Anthro-Vision: How Anthropology Can Explain Business and Life is out now.

With our society changing so rapidly in so many ways, how do we deal with the consistent disruption that plagues us? In an ideal world, we would possess inner tools such as slowing down and breathing, listening to others, and harnessing the power of empathy to move with the times.But in times of turbulence, it always comes as no surprise that we cling to the things we know. It's where we feel most comfortable. 
As someone who spends her days observing these disruptive forces in the world of finance and business, no one is better suited to think about how we respond than the editor at large of the Financial Times and renowned columnist and author Gillian Tett. Tett is uniquely suited to these times. Someone who possesses a coherent understanding of what makes us who we are. Her formative years were spent on the ground in Tajikistan studying wedding rituals. Then, in 2003 she made the unorthodox leap to a world full of opaque systems and middle-aged white men.

In 2007, she raised the alarm bells about the impending 2008 financial doom that was to roll through us; the rest, as we know, is history. Whilst we're still experiencing the ethical and moral fallout of that time, I sat down with Gillian to find out where we are today. Her new book Anthorvision deals with all manners of political, financial, technological and cultural changes. How we impose these on others, and how do we make meaning from these changes.

From her apartment in New York apartment, she gives us a unique insiders view of the modern world. One where bitcoin is on pace to replace fiat currency, where tunnel vision and tribal illusions are destroying the fabric of our society and where the world's power rests at the hands of the geeks and technologists.

She assures us we need to think more like amateur anthropologists instead of putting our needs first, looking out the window and seeing how the other side lives. It might sound like a simple sentiment, but it's one worth being reminded of over and over. I hope you find this human exchange as uniquely helpful as I did.

More info here:
Internet Engineering Task Force

Gillian Tett's book Anthro-Vision: How Anthropology Can Explain Business and Life is out now.

39 min

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