21 min

91. Exploring Tic Disorder and Tourette Syndrome Not Your Average Autism Mom

    • Parenting

Tourette Syndrome is a condition of the nervous system. It is a neurological disorder that involves often sudden and repetitive movements, twitches, or unwanted sounds (tics) that cannot be easily controlled.

Statistics show that around one in five children with Tourette Syndrome also meets the criteria for Autism. All the research that I have done, says that it is unlikely that so many children have both disorders but instead, Tourette’s symptoms often mimic or seem quite similar to those of autism.

No one knows exactly what causes tics to occur and they often change in type and intensity. You will usually notice that they might increase in times of excitement, anxiety, anticipation, stress, AND sleep deprivation.  They can also change over time and appear, disappear and reappear, they are considered chronic.

Screen time on electronic devices increases dopamine and tics are dopamine-related so if your child is using electronics in excess and experiencing tics, whether they are vocal or motor, I really would like to encourage you to evaluate their screen time and consider lessening their daily time.  

If your child’s tics are negatively impacting their education in the educational setting, we recommend that you request a meeting to discuss the possibilities of a 504 plan or an IEP to give them the necessary accommodations or services to help them.

Have you checked out our PRIVATE SISTERHOOD?

You should see all the training, resources, coaching, and above all, community inside.

We are an amazing group of women who are all traveling this unique autism parenting journey and we would love you have you join us.

Get all the details at www.notyouraverageautismmom.com



Additional Resources:

https://www.notyouraverageautismmom.com/blog/electronics-and-the-benefits-of-setting-screen-time-limits 

https://www.notyouraverageautismmom.com/blog/72-ripping-the-band-aid-off-on-electronics

You can contact the Tourette Association at www.tourette.org or by calling 888-4TOURET.

HBO documentary, I Have Tourette’s but Tourette’s Doesn’t Have Me

Tourette Syndrome is a condition of the nervous system. It is a neurological disorder that involves often sudden and repetitive movements, twitches, or unwanted sounds (tics) that cannot be easily controlled.

Statistics show that around one in five children with Tourette Syndrome also meets the criteria for Autism. All the research that I have done, says that it is unlikely that so many children have both disorders but instead, Tourette’s symptoms often mimic or seem quite similar to those of autism.

No one knows exactly what causes tics to occur and they often change in type and intensity. You will usually notice that they might increase in times of excitement, anxiety, anticipation, stress, AND sleep deprivation.  They can also change over time and appear, disappear and reappear, they are considered chronic.

Screen time on electronic devices increases dopamine and tics are dopamine-related so if your child is using electronics in excess and experiencing tics, whether they are vocal or motor, I really would like to encourage you to evaluate their screen time and consider lessening their daily time.  

If your child’s tics are negatively impacting their education in the educational setting, we recommend that you request a meeting to discuss the possibilities of a 504 plan or an IEP to give them the necessary accommodations or services to help them.

Have you checked out our PRIVATE SISTERHOOD?

You should see all the training, resources, coaching, and above all, community inside.

We are an amazing group of women who are all traveling this unique autism parenting journey and we would love you have you join us.

Get all the details at www.notyouraverageautismmom.com



Additional Resources:

https://www.notyouraverageautismmom.com/blog/electronics-and-the-benefits-of-setting-screen-time-limits 

https://www.notyouraverageautismmom.com/blog/72-ripping-the-band-aid-off-on-electronics

You can contact the Tourette Association at www.tourette.org or by calling 888-4TOURET.

HBO documentary, I Have Tourette’s but Tourette’s Doesn’t Have Me

21 min