87 episodes

A podcast about architecture, buildings and cities, from the distant past to the present day. Plus detours into technology, film, fiction, comics, drawings, and the dimly imagined future.

With Luke Jones and George Gingell.

About Buildings + Citie‪s‬ Luke Jones & George Gingell Discuss Architecture, History and Culture

    • Visual Arts
    • 4.7 • 188 Ratings

A podcast about architecture, buildings and cities, from the distant past to the present day. Plus detours into technology, film, fiction, comics, drawings, and the dimly imagined future.

With Luke Jones and George Gingell.

    78 —WG Sebald's Austerlitz — 2/2

    78 —WG Sebald's Austerlitz — 2/2

    Our second episode on WG Sebald's 2001 novel 'Austerlitz', in which discussed the complexities of depicting the holocaust, psychoanalysis, Perrault's Bibliothèque Nationale, Liverpool Street Station and Casanova.

    Watch Sebald giving a reading of Austerlitz and listen to an interview with him on KCRW.

    This episode is sponsored by Blue Crow Media, who gorgeous architectural maps. Use the offer code aboutbuildings at checkout to get 10% off.

    Edited by Matthew Lloyd Roberts.

    Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show.

    Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us!

    Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

    We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

    This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

    • 1 hr 7 min
    77 — WG Sebald's Austerlitz — 1/2

    77 — WG Sebald's Austerlitz — 1/2

    In our first episode of 2021 we discussed Austerlitz, WG Sebald's last novel, published just months before he died in a tragic accident. The novel is concerned with memory and trauma, explored through the life of Jacques Austerlitz, an architectural historian who has repressed his childhood memories of fleeing Prague as a refugee on the Kindertransport. Through Austerlitz's process of remembering and discovering his history, and the fate of his parents in Nazi concentration camps, the book explores the challenges of remembering and representing the Holocaust. It is a deeply architectural novel, concerned with different ways of understanding the historical agency of architecture, and the power that space and material culture have on the formation of memory and the process of remembering.

    Edited by Matthew Lloyd Roberts.

    Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show.

    Our sponsor for this episode is Blue Crow Media, who produce gorgeous architectural maps of different cities, including Pyongyang, Tbilisi and New York. Use the offer code aboutbuildings for 10% off your next purchase.

    Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us!

    Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

    We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

    This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

    • 58 min
    *Preview* — 76.5 — Robert Moses Bonus Episode

    *Preview* — 76.5 — Robert Moses Bonus Episode

    This is a preview from our latest Patreon Bonus Episode – subscribe to our Patreon for just $3 a month to listen to the whole episode! Thank you to everyone who supported the show this year, we couldn't have done it without you, and we can't wait to discuss more architectural history in 2021.

    Our final episode for 2020 is here and our last episode on Jane Jacobs. We're discussing Robert Moses, the megalomaniacal titan of New York planning who wielded enormous political power and bent the metropolis to his will, orchestrating a symphony of demolitions, highways, expressways and grands projets which changed the face of the city forever.

    'You can draw any kind of picture you want on a clean slate and indulge your every whim in the wilderness in laying out a New Delhi, Canberra, or Brasilia, but when you operate in an overbuilt metropolis, you have to hack your way with a meat ax.'

    He was also a spiteful bully, a racist, an egomaniac and a very difficult man, yet he maintained his authority and his power for almost 3 decades before a precipitous fall in the 1960s, when public and political opinion turned against him for good. He embodied everything that Jane Jacobs despised about urban planning, but his life and work have much to tell us about the mid-century city.

    Edited by Matthew Lloyd Roberts.

    Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us!

    Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

    We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

    This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

    • 5 min
    76 — Jane Jacobs — 2/2 — Unslumming and Gentrification

    76 — Jane Jacobs — 2/2 — Unslumming and Gentrification

    Our second episode on Jane Jacobs' canonical work, 'The Death and Life of Great American Cities'. In this second half we further discuss her vision for the ideal city, based on her experiences in Greenwich Village in the 1950s. We focus on her ideas around 'unslumming', her alternative model of gentle and community-led gentrification which offered an alternative to the mass-demolition of deprived neighbourhoods advocated by planners during this period. We talk about the ethics and politics of gentrification and Jane's blindspot for certain pernicious effects of market economics, and her proposals for economic health. We also discuss her approach to the car in the city, which will feel very familiar to anyone concerned with transportation and urbanism today. Subscribe to our Patreon for a bonus episode coming soon on Jane's campaigns against Robert Moses and the Lower Manhattan Expressway.

    Our sponsor for this episode is Blue Crow Media, who produce gorgeous architectural maps of different cities, including Pyongyang, Tbilisi and New York. Use the offer code aboutbuildings for 10% off your next purchase!

    Edited by Matthew Lloyd Roberts.

    Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show.

    Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us!

    Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

    We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

    This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

    • 1 hr 16 min
    75 — Jane Jacobs — 1/2 — Eyes on the Street

    75 — Jane Jacobs — 1/2 — Eyes on the Street

    The first episode in a two-part series on Jane Jacobs, a profoundly influential writer, thinker and campaigner on issues of urbanism, whose magnum opus 'The Death and Life of Great American Cities' (1961) forms the backbone of our discussion. In it, Jacobs lays out an idealised vision of tight-knit, dense communities, inspired by her time living in Greenwich Village, Manhattan. It is a vision of an interconnected, urban way of life dominated by local small-scale agents: families, independent businesses and community ties from which emerge vitality, security and comfort in densely populated streets of tenements with wide sidewalks and endless lines of sight across the bustling public spaces.

    Jacobs' work was a rejection of many sacred cows of modernist planning, espoused by architects and bureaucrats alike: questions of density, scale, urban grain, transportation and space. Jacobs felt that their efforts rarely supported the vitality and energy she found so alluring in the tenements of Greenwich Village.

    Subscribe to our Patreon for a discussion of one of the infrastructure projects Jacobs campaigned against: Robert Moses and the Lower Manhattan Expressway.

    Also, we just reached 1 million listens on this feed! Thank you so much for all your support, we couldn't have done it without you. Remember to tell a friend, and give the show a review if you enjoyed it.

    Our sponsor for this episode is Blue Crow Media, who produce gorgeous architectural maps of different cities, including Pyongyang, Tbilisi and New York. Use the offer code aboutbuildings for 10% off your next purchase!

    Edited by Matthew Lloyd Roberts.

    Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show.

    Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us!

    Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

    We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

    This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

    74 — Monasteries — 3/3 — Fourier, Narkomfin, La Tourette

    74 — Monasteries — 3/3 — Fourier, Narkomfin, La Tourette

    The final episode in our series on the deep history of the monastery. Modernity has arrived and monasticism is living a strange afterlife. First, we discuss the early 19th century Utopian Socialism of Charles Fourier, whose Phalanstère take the framework of the monastery and repurpose it to build community whose purpose is not the Opus Dei, but to ensure that all its members live fulfilling and happy lives. Next come the Constructivist communities of the early Soviet Union, where monastic communal living is weaponised as a tool to smash traditional bourgeois lifestyles and mould the next generation. Lastly we return to the the sunny hills of southern France, where Le Corbusier brought together his late-career love of sculptural concrete with the religious revival in postwar France to build the greatest monastery of the 20th century, La Tourette.

    Our final episode of this series, on Romanticism and the Monastery, will be out on our Patreon feed next week.

    Make sure you visit our instagram and view the pinned stories on 'Monasteries' for all the images from this series. Our next series on Jane Jacobs will begin next month.

    Edited by Matthew Lloyd Roberts.

    Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show.

    Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us!

    Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

    We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

    This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

    • 1 hr 9 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
188 Ratings

188 Ratings

PaulEwright ,

Great Banter on a Range of Architectural Subjects

Luke and George have a great chemistry discussing a variety of architectural periods and styles, and I’m particularly a fan of how they interlace a bit of wit and comedy into their commentary. Using texts as a means of launching their discussions is also an appreciated approach, as it gives the listening a good reference for following up or following along with their discussions.

Bellow Chicago ,

Great Show

Very insightful comments about architecture.

Landy Landy ,

Thoughtful and entertaining

I’m not aware of a better podcast centered on architectural design. It is extremely well done and entertaining. Can’t speak highly enough of it.

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