33 episodes

This podcast is an interview series that will feature autistic adults from a variety of backgrounds to learn about their life, talents, challenges and the ups and downs of being on the autism spectrum.

Adulting on the Spectrum Autism Speaks

    • Society & Culture
    • 3.7 • 24 Ratings

This podcast is an interview series that will feature autistic adults from a variety of backgrounds to learn about their life, talents, challenges and the ups and downs of being on the autism spectrum.

    Autism and Religion

    Autism and Religion

    Hosts, Andrew Komarow and Eileen Lamb, speak to Erin Burnett. Erin is a 23 year old autistic woman from Northern Ireland, diagnosed at 18. She is the author of two books, a fantasy novel for children, and a nonfiction book about autism and the church.
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    The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of Autism Speaks.

    • 28 min
    Stand-up comedy, sarcasm, and history

    Stand-up comedy, sarcasm, and history

    Hosts, Andrew Komarow and Eileen Lamb, speak with Nell Russs. Nell is an autistic stand-up comedian, and a self-professed history nerd.
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    The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of Autism Speaks.

    • 25 min
    Ep. 31 Love on the Spectrum

    Ep. 31 Love on the Spectrum

    Hosts, Andrew Komarow and Eileen Lamb, speak with author of nine best-selling books, Jennifer Cook (formerly Cook O'Toole). Jennifer is an autistic advocate who was diagnosed as an adult and has appeared on the Netflix series, "Love on the Spectrum U.S." as an autism expert.
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    The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of Autism Speaks.

    • 48 min
    Ep. 30 Constructed Language, Job Hunting and Pokémon

    Ep. 30 Constructed Language, Job Hunting and Pokémon

    Hosts, Andrew Komarow and Eileen Lamb, speaks with Joy. Joy is an autistic writer with a particular interest in constructed language, video games and Pokémon. Professionally, she is seeking employment and developing some professional skills before returning to school for creative writing.
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    The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of Autism Speaks.

    • 25 min
    Ep. 29 Neurodiverse Hiring and a Passion for Carnivorous Plants

    Ep. 29 Neurodiverse Hiring and a Passion for Carnivorous Plants

    Hosts, Andrew Komarow and Eileen Lamb, speak with Rebecca Alley. Rebecca was diagnosed with autism at age 23 and went through a neurodiverse hiring program to find her job at a large financial institution as a project management officer. She also has a passion for carnivorous plants.
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    The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of Autism Speaks.

    • 41 min
    Ep. 28 Finding My Calling Helping The Autism Community

    Ep. 28 Finding My Calling Helping The Autism Community

    Hosts, Andrew Komarow and Eileen Lamb speak with Tony Hernandez. Tony is a bilingual autistic author, writer, motivational speaker, podcaster and international advocate for autism, mental health and other causes. He was born and raised in Puerto Rico currently lives in Florida. Tony works with Autism Speaks as part of the Autism Response Team, which is an information line for the autism community.
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    The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the views of Autism Speaks.

    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5
24 Ratings

24 Ratings

AnnaU2034 ,

Balanced views

Loved the balanced views in this podcast and love more information for adults with autism!

MyElectricTypewriter ,

Steer Clear of this Ableist Garbage

In a nutshell, co-host Eileen Lamb is the autistic version of Alison Singer. She hits every martyr-parent talking point, from devaluing the existence of autistic individuals with the most intensive support needs (cure for thee, but not for me) to dismissing the validity (and often necessity) of self-diagnosis to promoting and defending autistic conversion therapy (a.k.a. ABA).

Also like Singer, Lamb loves trolling pro-neurodiversity members of the autistic community. When they take the bait and punch back, she plays the role of the hapless victim who was attacked just for having a differing opinion.

The fact that Autism Speaks not only employs Lamb, but also tasks her with co-hosting this podcast, is proof enough that said organization is just as toxic, ableist and pro-cure as ever. The only autistic people they’re interested in engaging with are the compliant tokens who happily provide them with cover in exchange for a platform.

If you’re an autistic person or ally who legitimately wants to learn more about the autistic experience and what you can do to fight for equity, inclusion and acceptance for the autistic community, there are countless autistic creators and activists (including other autistic parents of autistic children) who you’d be better off learning from and engaging with. Steer clear of this ableist garbage.

Jess R., MSW ,

“Us” and “them” narrative

I was hopeful for this podcast at first and listening to a few episodes. I recognize the importance of showcasing differing views, and that’s not my issue, but I am a clinical social worker currently going through the formal diagnosis process who is currently self identified autistic, and this show has made their stance on self diagnosis very clear on multiple episodes, which leaves me and I’m sure a lot of other self identified/realized/diagnosed people feeling like we don’t belong and aren’t even aloud to be in spaces trying to learn more about ourselves. I was also very excited to see that they had another clinical social worker on the show, and during the interview it sounded like she agreed with self diagnosis, as she stated a lot that we “know ourselves best”, however, as the show went on and Eileen made it very clear about her stance on self diagnosis, the social worker started to shift from validating self-diagnosis, to being wishy washy about it, maybe because the podcast no longer felt like a safe space to hold a belief that we truly do know ourselves best? Overall just very disappointing and saddening. Again, coming from an understanding, as a clinical social worker myself, all the many reasons why someone might slip through the cracks and all the reasons why formal diagnosis is not accessible.

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