15 episodes

Discover the hidden side of everything with Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the Freakonomics books. Each week, Freakonomics Radio tells you things you always thought you knew (but didn’t) and things you never thought you wanted to know (but do) — from the economics of sleep to how to become great at just about anything. Dubner speaks with Nobel laureates and provocateurs, intellectuals and entrepreneurs, and various other underachievers. The entire archive, going back to 2010, is available on the Stitcher podcast app and at freakonomics.com.

Freakonomics Radio Stitcher

    • Documentary
    • 4.5, 22K Ratings

Discover the hidden side of everything with Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the Freakonomics books. Each week, Freakonomics Radio tells you things you always thought you knew (but didn’t) and things you never thought you wanted to know (but do) — from the economics of sleep to how to become great at just about anything. Dubner speaks with Nobel laureates and provocateurs, intellectuals and entrepreneurs, and various other underachievers. The entire archive, going back to 2010, is available on the Stitcher podcast app and at freakonomics.com.

    425. Remembrance of Economic Crises Past

    425. Remembrance of Economic Crises Past

    Christina Romer was a top White House economist during the Great Recession. As a researcher, she specializes in the Great Depression. She tells us what those disasters can (and can’t) teach us about the Covid crash.

    • 51 min
    424. How to Make Your Own Luck

    424. How to Make Your Own Luck

    Before she decided to become a poker pro, Maria Konnikova didn’t know how many cards are in a deck. But she did have a Ph.D. in psychology, a brilliant coach, and a burning desire to know whether life is driven more by skill or chance. She found some answers in poker — and in her new book The Biggest Bluff, she’s willing to tell us everything she learned.

    • 1 hr
    423. The Doctor Will Zoom You Now

    423. The Doctor Will Zoom You Now

    Thanks to the pandemic, the telehealth revolution we’ve been promised for decades has finally arrived. Will it stick? Will it cut costs — and improve outcomes? We ring up two doctors and, of course, an economist to find out.

    • 52 min
    422. Introducing "No Stupid Questions"

    422. Introducing "No Stupid Questions"

    In this new addition to the Freakonomics Radio Network, co-hosts Stephen Dubner and Angela Duckworth discuss the relationship between age and happiness. Also: does all creativity come from pain? New episodes of "No Stupid Questions" are released every Sunday evening — please subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

    • 33 min
    421. How to Prevent Another Great Depression

    421. How to Prevent Another Great Depression

    Millions and millions are out of work, with some jobs never coming back. We speak with four economists — and one former presidential candidate — about the best policy options and the lessons (good and bad) from the past.

    • 37 min
    420. Which Jobs Will Come Back, and When?

    420. Which Jobs Will Come Back, and When?

    Covid-19 is the biggest job killer in a century. As the lockdown eases, what does re-employment look like? Who will be first and who last? Which sectors will surge and which will disappear? Welcome to the Great Labor Reallocation of 2020.

    • 42 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
22K Ratings

22K Ratings

GASteveS ,

How to make your own luck!

Insightful edition! Very powerful concepts well presented...definitely on my reading list!

LppCo ,

Fan of the Show

Book Club - Yes please!!

Lostbonsai ,

Blind spot

That intro music by the Hitchhikers is capital Dee-lightful, and I’m going to miss hearing it regularly on the podcast. I’ve held out hope for too long on this one, though.

If there’s been a peep out of Freakonomics to give a platform to much needed race-related dialogue, I have missed it. (For a great example of journalism in this area, see Planet Money’s episode on the price of reparations to torture victims, some of whom are still serving time for confessions that were coerced by corrupt police using a cattle prod.)

Between this conspicuous absence of one of the most salient issues facing Americans today, and a thinly-argued episode that states conclusively that rent control doesn’t work — I’d be entirely willing to consider this, but it arrives at its conclusion far too quickly and smugly, with limited examples and small section of biased spokespeople, alongside the failure to truly acknowledge and grapple with the housing crisis, why rent control has been fought for, and the other side of the coin (the way wealthy landlords consciously weaponize gentrification, violating rules and getting slaps on the wrist, conducting endless construction around the clock to terrorize residents out of their homes) — I have to walk away from this podcast, shaking my head.

And when I think on that intro music, I realize there’s another taste of bitterness: amazing Black music opening for a podcast that entirely fails to grapple with the hard questions and, through its silence, ends up being actively complicit with an unjust system.

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