1,009 episodes

Join Shumita Basu every weekday morning as she guides you through some of the most fascinating stories in the news — and how the world’s best journalists are covering them.

Apple News Today Apple News

    • News
    • 3.7 • 5.9K Ratings

Join Shumita Basu every weekday morning as she guides you through some of the most fascinating stories in the news — and how the world’s best journalists are covering them.

    Why the O.J. Simpson trial still matters

    Why the O.J. Simpson trial still matters

    Following an Israeli attack on a major hospital, Gazans are sifting through the rubble for the bodies of their dead. NBC News has the story.

    Time explains how O.J. Simpson changed everything.

    Financial columnist Charlotte Cowles tells Apple News In Conversation how she got scammed out of $50,000 and suggests ways to prevent that happening to you.

    ‘Bluey’ fans are worried that the much-loved children’s cartoon could be ending. Bloomberg Businessweek reports.

    Today’s episode was guest-hosted by Yasmeen Khan.

    • 10 min
    What the judge will ask jurors in Trump hush-money case

    What the judge will ask jurors in Trump hush-money case

    The start of Trump’s first criminal trial offers a vexing question: how to find a proper jury for such an unprecedented case. Erica Orden from Politico describes the selection process.

    For one Nigerian family, freedom after a kidnapping hasn’t ended their terror. NPR tells their harrowing story.

    An astronaut will land on the moon. For the first time, they won’t be an American. USA Today has more.

    Today’s episode was guest-hosted by Yasmeen Khan.

    • 10 min
    Delayed student financial aid leaves millions in limbo

    Delayed student financial aid leaves millions in limbo

    As millions wait for delayed college financial aid, families are facing tough choices. NBC News journalist Haley Messenger has the story.

    The BBC reports on how a group of Swiss women has won the first ever climate-case victory in the European Court of Human Rights.

    ESPN looks back on the career of Tara VanDerveer, who is retiring as the winningest coach in college basketball history. And the Wall Street Journal reveals how the NCAA women beat the men in finals’ ratings for the first time — but brought in 99% less TV money.

    Today’s episode was guest-hosted by Yasmeen Khan.

    • 10 min
    Why more Americans are moving back in with family

    Why more Americans are moving back in with family

    Key Republican members of Congress are planning to retire. Washington Post reporter Marianna Sotomayor explains how that spells trouble for Speaker Mike Johnson. 

    More Americans are now living with their parents. Vox details the economic, cultural, and environmental reasons why.

    The U.S. is bracing for trillions of cicadas to emerge from the earth, in a rare double event. The Guardian has the story. 

    Today’s episode was guest-hosted by Yasmeen Khan.

    Correction: An earlier version of this episode incorrectly identified University of Connecticut head coach Dan Hurley as the son of actor Bill Murray. Murray’s son Luke is an assistant coach at the school.

    • 11 min
    Eclipse day is here. Here’s how to prepare.

    Eclipse day is here. Here’s how to prepare.

    Today’s the day of the event we’ve all been waiting for: the total solar eclipse. Apple News has what you need to know.

    NPR correspondents including Daniel Estrin reflect on six months of Israel’s war in Gaza.

    The big problem for marijuana companies? What to do with all that cash. The Wall Street Journal’s Alexander Saeedy has the story.

    And South Carolina defeated Iowa to win the women’s NCAA national title. Read coverage of the game from The State.

    Today’s episode was guest-hosted by Yasmeen Khan.

    • 11 min
    The new magic number for retirement planning, and how to see the eclipse

    The new magic number for retirement planning, and how to see the eclipse

    Tonight is the Final Four of the women’s NCAA Tournament. Apple News sports editor Haley O’Shaughnessy joins us to explain why it’s such a powerful moment for women’s basketball, while the Los Angeles Times takes a look at how Caitlin Clark ended up playing against UConn instead of for them.

    The Washington Post has your ultimate guide to the coming total solar eclipse, its path, and how to watch. 

    The new magic number for retirement is $1.46 million. Here’s what it tells us, according to the Wall Street Journal.

    Today’s episode was guest-hosted by Mark Garrison.

    • 10 min

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5
5.9K Ratings

5.9K Ratings

Whenkey ,

No yasmeen khan, please

Everything is good except Yasmeen Khan filling in for Sumita Basu. Yasmeen Khan’s voice is painful for my ears. Anyone else but no Yasmeen Khan please.

Cello Lucy ,

Please, no celebrity news!!

I agree with the others who want only serious news! No Tiktoc, no social media “news”!

PeabodyNsherman ,

I listen everyday, it’s a quick summary of news, but:

3/31/24 why are we still talking about Beyonce? Is the this the new norm? Log into tiktok, fill up on celebrity nonsense and legitimize it as ‘news’? 2/15/24: please please stray away from pop culture, it comes out as lazy work. Some of us don’t give a sht for Beyonce’s music. All I learned in this episode, and all over social media, is that she is a terrible country singer. correction 10/7/2022 episode- the Astros did not “beat” the Dodgers in 2017 World Series, the Astros cheated and their actions have been recognized by the league. Cheaters shouldn’t be considered winners. posted years ago: Everytime they mention the Kardashians or celebrity break ups they loose a star. I want news not gossip!

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