18 episodes

Join Shumita Basu and Duarte Geraldino every weekday morning as they guide you through some of the most fascinating stories in the news — and how the world’s best journalists are covering them.

Apple News Today Apple News Editors

    • Daily News
    • 3.3, 2.2K Ratings

Join Shumita Basu and Duarte Geraldino every weekday morning as they guide you through some of the most fascinating stories in the news — and how the world’s best journalists are covering them.

    Why 1 in 13 Black adults can’t vote

    Why 1 in 13 Black adults can’t vote

    NPR reports on the recent executive order signed by Iowa’s governor restoring the right to vote to Iowans convicted of felonies. And the Guardian gives an overview of a controversial bill in Florida that limits the voting rights of those with a felony conviction. 

    PBS NewsHour has an interview with author Anne Applebaum on the rise of authoritarian regimes during the pandemic. Washington Post columnist George Will echoes her concerns and argues the shift is motivated by both ends of the political spectrum.

    The Washington Post looks at how low health literacy has become an even larger problem as doctors and health officials communicate information about COVID-19.

    The Wall Street Journal has the story of how Eddy Alvarez went from Olympic speedskater to professional baseball player.

    • 7 min
    Lebanon faces a crisis within a crisis

    Lebanon faces a crisis within a crisis

    After the devastating explosion in Beirut, BBC News provides an overview of the economic, political, and health crises Lebanon has faced leading up to this point. And Al Jazeera speaks to Beirut residents about their experiences of the recent incident. Apple News has a collection of Lebanon coverage.

    Politico looks at how U.S. governors have responded to the coronavirus pandemic in their states.

    The Atlantic says COVID-19 will continue to exist after the pandemic has ended.

    The U.S. dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima 75 years ago. The Washington Post has the story of an American who was a child in the Japanese city that day.

    • 8 min
    Lessons from the 2020 primaries

    Lessons from the 2020 primaries

    Most primaries have run smoothly this year, FiveThirtyEight finds.

    The New Yorker highlights one government institution that has had a successful pandemic: the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. 

    The Wall Street Journal describes how parents and educators are creating “pandemic pods” that are more inclusive.

    And NPR says forests are on the move.

    • 8 min
    The failed American COVID-19 response, ballot delays, life on a private jet

    The failed American COVID-19 response, ballot delays, life on a private jet

    Ed Yong writes for the Atlantic about America’s failure to control the spread of COVID-19, and the changes that would better prepare this country for future pandemics.

    As the election approaches, the Washington Post reports on concerns that new Postal Service rules could lead to delivery delays and uncounted ballots. And Vice News has the story of post offices notifying the public of closures and reduced hours, only to abruptly walk back those announcements.

    An essay from BuzzFeed News explores the unsustainable combination of parenting while working from home.

    Bloomberg Businessweek gives an inside look at the ultra-rich who fly on private jets.

    • 8 min
    Coronavirus lawsuits, the declining birth rate, teenagers work the polls

    Coronavirus lawsuits, the declining birth rate, teenagers work the polls

    The Wall Street Journal says lawsuits have been filed against employers across the country over worker deaths from COVID-19.

    Bloomberg Businessweek examines the potential for a significant decrease in U.S. births next year and asks what it could mean for the future economy.

    One hundred years after women won the right to vote, Smithsonian Magazine describes the challenges the first female voters faced when trying to cast their ballots.

    CNN suggests one possible solution to the poll worker shortage: teenagers.

    • 8 min
    $600 on the line, Supreme Court secrets, Van Gogh’s final days

    $600 on the line, Supreme Court secrets, Van Gogh’s final days

    The Wall Street Journal asks whether the weekly $600 in unemployment aid is disincentivizing people from rejoining the workforce. And PBS NewsHour has economists on both sides of the aisle weigh in on the debate.

    CNN obtains internal memos that reveal the inner workings of this year’s Supreme Court deliberations. Read the four-part series: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4.

    Journalists at the San Francisco Chronicle follow Theo, a 7-year-old boy who’s been homeless his whole life.

    And a new discovery about Vincent Van Gogh’s final painting. Newsweek has the story. 

    • 8 min

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5
2.2K Ratings

2.2K Ratings

Nick Burress ,

Welcome to Short and Tp the Point

I enjoy it. You will see a lot of reviewers who want to live in a different reality but check it for yourself. It’ll take you only 10 or so minutes to decide if it’s for you.

EJTMJr ,

Just more Lies

Apple should do what they did when it tried self driving cars, Stop 🛑.

rafaelmorenoco ,

Refreshing

I like it because it has a good approach to the news and if you want to dive deep, you can just read the articles where they took the news from, from the episode notes.

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