10 episodes

On the occasion of the exhibition Splendour and Glory: Art of the Russian Orthodox Church in Hermitage Amsterdam (19 March – 16 September 2011) a special lecture series was held in the museum. The Amsterdam Centre for Orthodox Theology (ACOT) of VU University Amsterdam organized this series of four times two academic lectures. The lectures were given on the following dates:

26 March: Revd. Dr. Michael Bakker and Revd. Prof. Andrew Louth (general introduction and introduction to Russian Orthodox tradition)
16 April: Revd. Prof. Andrew Louth and Aidan Hart, BA (images and icons)
21 May: Revd. Prof. Andrew Louth and Revd. Dr. Ivan Moody (liturgy and music)
18 June: Revd. Dr. Cyril Hovorun and Revd. Prof. Andrew Louth (monasticism and spirituality).

Art and Spirituality of the Russian Orthodox Tradition ACOT, VU University Amsterdam

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 3.3 • 4 Ratings

On the occasion of the exhibition Splendour and Glory: Art of the Russian Orthodox Church in Hermitage Amsterdam (19 March – 16 September 2011) a special lecture series was held in the museum. The Amsterdam Centre for Orthodox Theology (ACOT) of VU University Amsterdam organized this series of four times two academic lectures. The lectures were given on the following dates:

26 March: Revd. Dr. Michael Bakker and Revd. Prof. Andrew Louth (general introduction and introduction to Russian Orthodox tradition)
16 April: Revd. Prof. Andrew Louth and Aidan Hart, BA (images and icons)
21 May: Revd. Prof. Andrew Louth and Revd. Dr. Ivan Moody (liturgy and music)
18 June: Revd. Dr. Cyril Hovorun and Revd. Prof. Andrew Louth (monasticism and spirituality).

    • video
    Monasticism and Spirituality

    Monasticism and Spirituality

    This lecture consists of an overview of Orthodox monasticism. The following
    subjects are treated:
    - Judaism: Essenes
    - Celibacy in the Gospels and the Early Church
    - The Egyptian Desert, Palestine and Syria
    - Mount Athos
    - Monasticism in the Slavic world
    - St Seraphim of Sarov
    - The elders of Optina
    - Contemporary Monasticism

    • 1 hr 3 min
    • video
    Prayer and Hesychasm in the Orthodox Church

    Prayer and Hesychasm in the Orthodox Church

    One of the features of Russian Orthodox Christianity has been the
    prominence of monasteries. Soon after the conversion of Russia there was
    founded the monastery of the Caves in Kiev; later on, there was established
    by St Sergei of Radonezh the famous monastery of the Trinity (now called the
    Sergei-Trinity Lavra) outside Moscow. Monasticism had been a feature of
    Christianity since the fourth century. At the heart of monasticism is
    commitment to the life of prayer, and in the earliest texts onwards we find
    7
    discussions about how to maintain a life of continual prayer. In fourteenthcentury
    Byzantium there arose a controversy about the so-called hesychast
    monks (‘hesychast’ being derived from the Greek hesychia, quietness) about
    claims that, through continual prayer, there could be attained the vision of the
    uncreated light of the Godhead itself. Hesychast monks were important in
    the bringing of Christianity to the region around Moscow in the fourteenth
    century (the circle of St Sergei). The notion of contemplating the uncreated
    light of the Godhead is manifest in iconography, especially of the
    Transfiguration of the Lord, about this time. The hesychast monks came to be
    associated with a practice of inward prayer (‘prayer of the heart’) achieved by
    practice of the Jesus Prayer (‘Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on
    me, a sinner’): a prayer that became very popular in nineteenth-century
    Russia, as the famous book, The Way of the Pilgrim, bears witness.

    • 43 min
    • video
    The Many Voices of Russia: A Survey of Russian Choral Music

    The Many Voices of Russia: A Survey of Russian Choral Music

    This lecture presents a survey of the history of Russian polyphonic choral
    music, from the earliest experiments at two-and three-part writing in the 17th
    century to the work of contemporary composers such as Dimitriev and Genin,
    and including the repertories influence variously by Polish-Ukrainian music
    and German and Italian styles, the change in approach heralded by
    Tchaikovsky's Liturgy of St John Chrysostom, and the work of the "Moscow
    School" and the achievements of Rachmaninov.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    • video
    The Place of the Liturgy in Orthodoxy

    The Place of the Liturgy in Orthodoxy

    It is claimed by the Russian Primary Chronicle that it was the experience of the
    Divine Liturgy in the church of the Holy Wisdom in Constantinople that
    persuaded the ambassadors of Prince Vladimir to recommend the adoption of
    Orthodoxy: ‘we knew not whether we were in heaven or on earth… We only
    know that there God dwells among men’. The experience of the Divine
    Liturgy remains central to Orthodox experience, not least Russian Orthodox
    experience. First of all, the liturgy takes place in a sacred space; the church
    building is divided by an iconostasis which separates the sanctuary (called
    the altar) from the nave, the clergy from the people. ‘Separates’—but also
    links and unites: the deacon, in particular, passes between the nave and the
    altar, and in singing the litanies, carries the prayers of the people into the
    presence of God. Secondly, the differentiated space makes possible a
    movement of symbolism—from nave to altar, from earth to heaven. The 5
    movement of the liturgy—processions, incensing—draws together heaven
    and earth. There is a sense of rhythm about the liturgy, which one very soon
    picks up. The music—sung by human voices, without instruments; that is, by
    ‘instruments’ made by God in his image—the colour of the icons and the
    vestments, the splendour of the sacred vessels: in all of this, the material
    world is affirmed and offered to God. Thirdly, the splendour manifest in this
    way is the splendour of the Kingdom of God, of the Heavens, which is
    proclaimed by the priest at the beginning of the Liturgy—‘Blessed is the
    Kingdom of the Father, and the Son and the Holy Spirit’—and which recurs
    throughout the liturgy, until before Holy Communion, we beg to be
    ‘remembered in the Kingdom’ along with the repentant thief.

    • 48 min
    • video
    General Introduction 1

    General Introduction 1

    After a general introduction to the course and information about the practical
    arrangements, the following subjects will be treated:
    - The early church and the Eastern Orthodox Church
    - The Roman Empire and Byzantium
    - The Old (Church) Slavic language and Russian
    - Glagolitic and Cyrillic alphabets
    - The texts initially translated from Greek into Old Slavic
    - Some samples of Slavic writing: inscriptions on icons

    • 30 min
    • video
    Images and Icons within Russian Orthodox

    Images and Icons within Russian Orthodox

    One of the features of Russian Orthodoxy that most strikes Westerners when
    they encounter Orthodoxy is the prominence of icons, or sacred images. The
    Russians inherited from Byzantine Orthodoxy a sense of the importance of
    images in worship, both public and private, that had been enhanced by the 3
    iconoclast controversy of the eighth to ninth centuries, and the final defeat of
    iconoclasm. This controversy, far more important in Byzantium than in the
    West, made icons a required aspect of Orthodox practice. It also involved the
    acceptance of an understanding of the place of religious images as ways of
    disclosing invisible realities, but also a way in which the material found an
    important place in religious practice, and indeed came to be held to be
    entailed by God’s assumption of humanity in the Incarnation. Because of the
    ‘linguistic filter’, all of this became hugely important within the world of Slav
    Orthodoxy. Orthodox devotion revolved around icons, and, as in Byzantium,
    they played a role in the defence of the Orthodox nations against attack.
    Legends traced icons back to the time of Christ; the Vladimir icon of the
    Mother of God being claimed as the work of St Luke the Evangelist (a claim
    Byzantine had made for the Hodigitria icon of the Mother of God). Particular
    icons—especially of the Mother of God—were associated with different places
    and had their own cult. Icons also provided a way of linking the public
    worship of the Church with the private devotions of Orthodox Christians:
    homes came to have a small domestic shrine, the ‘beautiful corner’, krasny
    ugol.

    • 48 min

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

Need a nick ,

Interesting, but...

Very informative lecture. But the speaker refers to images that are projected on a screen next to him which are not seen by the viewer of this video. As the icons are far beyond copyright I don't understand why they are not included in the video.

EvandroF ,

Where are the files?

The files seem not to be on the server anymore...

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