174 episodes

Peek inside the Berkman Klein Center's Audio Fishbowl: Conversations with leading cyber-scholars, entrepreneurs, activists, and policymakers as they explore the bleeding edge of the internet and technology, democracy, law, and society. (Also available as video) From the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University.
Want to hear more? Listen to the Platform - our fully produced podcast, featuring exclusive interviews and conversations from inside the Berkman Klein Center.

Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society: Audio Fishbowl Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University

    • Society & Culture
    • 3.7 • 7 Ratings

Peek inside the Berkman Klein Center's Audio Fishbowl: Conversations with leading cyber-scholars, entrepreneurs, activists, and policymakers as they explore the bleeding edge of the internet and technology, democracy, law, and society. (Also available as video) From the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University.
Want to hear more? Listen to the Platform - our fully produced podcast, featuring exclusive interviews and conversations from inside the Berkman Klein Center.

    Framing Decisions: a Book Talk About Human Advantage in an Age of Technology and Turmoil

    Framing Decisions: a Book Talk About Human Advantage in an Age of Technology and Turmoil

    This book talk features Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, a co-author of the recently published book Framers: Human Advantage in an Age of Technology and Turmoil. The book explores how reframing some of the world's most challenging problems, particularly when it comes to technology, can create new opportunities and better outcomes for humans to not just survive but thrive in a world increasingly dominated by technology. Joining Viktor as discussants are Malavika Jayaram, the Executive Director of Digital Asia Hub, and Sabelo Mhlambi, founder of Bantucracy, who provide their own insights about the book.

    • 58 min
    At the Crossroads of Digital Imperialism & Digital Development

    At the Crossroads of Digital Imperialism & Digital Development

    The global information economy has provided freedom-enhancing affordances for previously marginalized groups, but has also enabled extractive practices in the form of digital imperialism, or as others term it, data colonialism. For so-called “periphery” countries such as those in sub-Saharan Africa, the information economy represents an opportunity to chase the long-elusive quest for industrialization, now dubbed “digital industrialization”, “digital development” or “data for development.” Despite the optimism represented in the digital development policy discourse, the limits and potentials of any kind of development are heavily constrained by background conditions rooted in past global power imbalances and a colonial legacy of non-contextual laws and institutions. This panel examines questions of unequal power in the global digital economy (through U.S corporations, China, and Brussels (i.e. dominance through legal rules), and the ways in which this manifests itself in developing countries in Africa.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Mistrust: How to revitalize civics at a moment of low public trust in institutions

    Mistrust: How to revitalize civics at a moment of low public trust in institutions

    Even before the storming of the US Capitol, mistrust in institutions like the press and the federal government was challenging the civic fabric of America. In Ethan Zuckerman's new book, "Mistrust", he explores the deep roots of this mistrustful moment and examines ways individuals can make social change whether or not they have faith in institutions. In conversation with legal scholar and human rights expert Martha Minow, the discussion considers how movements like Black Lives Matter and Me Too are forcing changes in institutions that may lead to rebuilding trust.

    • 1 hr
    Restoring US Leadership for Global Health

    Restoring US Leadership for Global Health

    Governments around the world failed to contain COVID-19, with more than 3.2 million deaths and counting. Even before the pandemic, the United States was questioning its commitments to global health, its leadership role, and a system of progressive prices for medicines whereby the rich pay more to subsidize access for the poor. The pandemic is far from over: cases are surging today in India, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, Iran, Poland, Ukraine. Now, with the unprecedented pace of effective vaccine development and a new Administration in Washington, the US is called upon to lead again.

    Beth Cameron (US National Security Council) and Loyce Pace (US Department of Health and Human Services) discuss plans to restore US leadership for global health.

    • 55 min
    Foresight and Decolonial Humanitarian Tech Ethics

    Foresight and Decolonial Humanitarian Tech Ethics

    Can humanitarian actors play a more intentional role in designing just and equitable digital futures? Could we, in fact, design worlds that don't imagine some figures, particularly populations that we serve in the global south, to merely be passive beneficiaries and outside of the borders of expertise we seek? Instead of looking at digital governance in terms of control, weaving in feminist and decolonial approaches might help liberate our digital futures so that it is a space of safety and of humanity, and through this design new forms of digital humanism.

    Anasuya Sengupta, Sabelo Mhlambi, Andrew Zolli, and Aarathi Krishnan discuss how humanitarian actors can play a more intentional role in designing just and equitable digital futures.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Governing the Social Media City

    Governing the Social Media City

    The past few years have highlighted the range of problems that social media seems to amplify: harassment, hate speech, hoaxes, violent extremism, and more. Through traditional governing and research spaces (i.e., governments, academia, NGOs, and corporations), the default response is a focus on content moderation. However, this talk by Sahar Massachi, with Kathy Pham as a respondent, explores what it might be like to think about social media as a city. In this model, how can we rethink our approaches to these issues besides hiring more police to react to the problem? The conversation explores the use of integrity design to more meaningfully consider the underlying structures and how to more holistically address them.

    • 57 min

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5
7 Ratings

7 Ratings

Aspiring Jogger ,

Great content, low audio quality

It’s a privilege to have access to these talks, and I’m excited that this series is available. Just wish the audio quality was better, or the speakers were properly fitted with mics. It is very distracting sometimes.

ztvshow ,

Great show great conversations!

Love the guests that the Center brings in.

Costello_McFadden ,

Too bad the audio production quality is horrible

The content can be excellent at times, but The Berkman Center should be embarrassed that podcasts of such inferior production quality are distributed under its name - much of it is unlistenable. It's as if they just stuck a tape recorder on the podium and then just took the unedited output and dumped it into the iTunes feed.

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