500 episodes

Home to the Spectator's best podcasts on everything from politics to religion, literature to food and drink, and more. A new podcast every day from writers worth listening to.

Best of the Spectator The Spectator

    • News
    • 4.4 • 141 Ratings

Home to the Spectator's best podcasts on everything from politics to religion, literature to food and drink, and more. A new podcast every day from writers worth listening to.

    Women With Balls: Harriet Harman

    Women With Balls: Harriet Harman

    The most recent 'mother of the house', Harriet Harman has been an MP for 42 years. She has served in a number of cabinet positions, under six Labour leaders, both during government and opposition. She was also deputy leader of the Labour Party for eight years.

    In some ways, her story is emblematic of how women's roles in society have changed: challenging familial stereotypes, dealing with sexual harassment, and as a trailblazing politician. On this episode, Katy Balls talks to Harriet about the influence of her family, why she got into politics, and why Labour hasn't had a female leader yet.

    Produced by Patrick Gibbons.

    • 29 min
    The Edition: can Macron still outplay Le Pen?

    The Edition: can Macron still outplay Le Pen?

    This week: Macron’s game.

    Our cover piece looks at the big news following the European elections at the weekend, President Macron’s decision to call early parliamentary elections in France. Madness or genius, either way the decision comes with huge risk. And can he still outplay Le Pen, asks writer Jonathan Miller. Jonathan joins the podcast to analyse Macron’s decision alongside Professor Alberto Alemanno, who explains how the decision is realigning French politics, and argues it must be seen in its wider European context. (01:58)

    Then: Will and Gus take us through some of their favourite pieces from the magazine, including Catriona Olding’s Life column and Sam McPhail’s notes on Madri. 

    Also on the podcast: who decides how we see the past? Niger Biggar writes in the magazine this week about organisations which are being given a veto over the representation of Britain's history. Nigel takes issue with those from formerly marginalised communities having the final word on our shared history and joins the podcast to explain why there should be more scrutiny on such groups. (18:14)

    And finally: do historians talk down to children? In her column for the magazine this week Mary Wakefield writes about her experience trying to find engaging and challenging history books for her 8-year-old. She says that most children’s history books have dumbed down, in comparison to the classic ladybird books of the 60s. She joined the podcast to discuss with the author of the Adventures in Time children’s book series and host of the Rest is History podcast, Dominic Sandbrook. (31:16)

    Hosted by William Moore and Gus Carter. 

    Produced by Oscar Edmondson and Patrick Gibbons. 

    The Spectator will be hosting a special Live edition of Coffee House Shots in the aftermath of the election. Taking place on Thursday the 11th July - a week after the election - at 7pm here in Westminster, you can join Fraser Nelson, Katy Balls and Kate Andrews as they try to dissect the election results, a new government, and what comes next. 

    Tickets are £35, or £25 for subscribers. If you’re interested, you can book online at spectator.co.uk/shotslive   

    • 45 min
    The Book Club: Marlon James

    The Book Club: Marlon James

    My guest in this week’s Book Club podcast is Marlon James, who ten years ago published his Booker Prize winning novel A Brief History of Seven Killings. He tells me how that remarkable book came about, how he feared it would be 'my Satanic Verses', what genre means to him, the importance of myth, and what he learned from the X-Men.

    • 39 min
    Chinese Whispers: How would Britain's Labour party change UK-China relations?

    Chinese Whispers: How would Britain's Labour party change UK-China relations?

    In less than a month’s time, Britain may well have a new prime minister – and a different ruling party. Under 14 years of the Conservative party, the UK’s approach to China has swung from the sycophancy of the golden era to fear and loathing under Liz Truss, stabilising in the last couple of years to a compete but engage approach, all while public opinion on China has hardened following the Hong Kong protests and the pandemic.

    What will a new government bring? Will the managerialism of Keir Starmer change UK-China relations much from the managerialism of Rishi Sunak? This is not a hypothetical question as Labour looks set to win the election and the question, now, is how big the Conservative losses will be.

    Cindy Yu is joined by Sam Hogg, a political analyst who has covered China as seen by Westminster for years, under the newsletter he founded, Beijing to Britain. He last came on the podcast to discuss Liz Truss’s views on China – a lot has changed then.

    Produced by Cindy Yu and Joe Bedell-Brill.

    • 33 min
    Americano: how can you stop Donald Trump?

    Americano: how can you stop Donald Trump?

    Freddy Gray is joined by Alex Castellanos, Republican Party strategist who has served as media consultant to seven U.S. Presidential campaigns. They discuss Donald Trump's presidential campaign, his search for a vice president, and if there's any way Joe Biden can tarnish his image. 

    • 32 min
    Spectator Out Loud: Max Jeffery, Melanie McDonagh, Matthew Parris, Iain MacGregor and Petronella Wyatt

    Spectator Out Loud: Max Jeffery, Melanie McDonagh, Matthew Parris, Iain MacGregor and Petronella Wyatt

    On this week’s Spectator Out Loud: Max Jeffery reports on the rise of luxury watch thefts in London (1:18); Melanie McDonagh discusses the collapse of religion in Scotland (5:51); reflecting on the longevity of Diane Abbott and what her selection row means for Labour, Matthew Parris argues that shrewd plans need faultless execution (10:44); Iain MacGregor reviews Giles Milton’s book ‘The Stalin Affair’ (17:30); and, Petronella Wyatt ponders her lack of luck with love (21:49).
     
    Presented and produced by Patrick Gibbons. 

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
141 Ratings

141 Ratings

Borderd Gothic ,

I need views from the other side

I could not get the feeling out of my mind that
Eva Vlaardingerbroek did not sound credible, I could be completely wrong. I really needed the views from the side. Maybe you can do that on another show I would be interested.

Tjbrowne ,

Great podcast

I love the perspective brought to listeners , consistently interesting

MrsElska ,

Great podcast - great magazine!

Always love to hear from Douglas Murray, Andrew Doyle, Julie Bindel. Thank you to Freddie (editor) and all the Spectator staff!

Top Podcasts In News

Candace
Candace Owens
The Daily
The New York Times
The Tucker Carlson Show
Tucker Carlson Network
Up First
NPR
Pod Save America
Crooked Media
The Ben Shapiro Show
The Daily Wire

You Might Also Like

The Edition
The Spectator
Americano
The Spectator
Coffee House Shots
The Spectator
The spiked podcast
The spiked podcast
The Brendan O'Neill Show
The Brendan O'Neill Show
Last Orders - a spiked podcast
Last Orders - a spiked podcast

More by The Spectator

Americano
The Spectator
Coffee House Shots
The Spectator
The Edition
The Spectator
Holy Smoke
The Spectator
Women With Balls
The Spectator
Spectator Out Loud
Spectator Out Loud