58 episodes

Beyond Prisons is a podcast on justice, mass incarceration, and prison abolition. Hosted by @phillyprof03 & @bsonenstein

Beyond Prisons Beyond Prisons

    • Politics
    • 4.8, 141 Ratings

Beyond Prisons is a podcast on justice, mass incarceration, and prison abolition. Hosted by @phillyprof03 & @bsonenstein

    Dylan Rodríguez, Part I: Abolition Is Our Obligation

    Dylan Rodríguez, Part I: Abolition Is Our Obligation

    Professor, author, and abolitionist scholar Dr. Dylan Rodríguez joins Kim Wilson and Brian Sonenstein on an episode of the Beyond Prisons podcast. 
    This is the first part of a two part conversation. In Part 1, Dr. Rodríguez explains his belief that abolition is our obligation, touching on the development of anti-Black algorithms used to keep people in prison, what it means to be vulnerable in the context of doing this work and how vulnerability is the starting point for an abolitionist practice, and the profound impact that Robert Allen’s book Black Awakening in Capitalist America had on shaping Dylan’s own thinking. 
    We also talk about how academia declares institutional solidarity with white supremacy, and how some academics are the planners and architects of domestic war. Dr. Rodríguez reminds us that terror is not a thing that you can fix with training and he shares some of the conditions he places on conversations about prison reform. 
    Dylan Rodríguez is President of the American Studies Association (2020-2021). He served as the faculty-elected Chair of the UC Riverside Academic Senate (2016-2020) and a Professor at the University of California, Riverside. He spent the first sixteen years of his career in the Department of Ethnic Studies (serving as Chair from 2009-2016) and joined the Department of Media and Cultural Studies in 2017.
    Dylan’s thinking, writing, teaching, and scholarly activist labors address the complexity and normalized proliferation of historical regimes and logics of anti-Black and racial-colonial violence in everyday state, cultural, and social formations.  His work raises the question of how insurgent communities of people inhabit oppressive regimes and logics in ways that enable the collective genius of rebellion, survival, abolition, and radical futurity. What forms of shared creativity emerge from conditions of duress, and how do these insurgencies envision—and practice—transformations of power and community?  
    In addition to co-editing the field-shaping anthology Critical Ethnic Studies: A Reader (Duke University Press, 2016), Dylan is the author of two books: Forced Passages: Imprisoned Radical Intellectuals and the U.S. Prison Regime (University of Minnesota Press, 2006) and Suspended Apocalypse: White Supremacy, Genocide, and the Filipino Condition (University of Minnesota Press, 2009). His next book, White Reconstruction: Domestic Warfare and the Logic of Racial Genocide, is forthcoming from Fordham University Press in Fall 2020 and will be followed in 2021 by White Reconstruction II. 
    Follow Dylan on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dylanrodriguez
    Support Beyond Prisons Support our show and join us on Patreon. Check out our other donation options as well.
    Please listen, subscribe, and rate/review our podcast on iTunes, Spotify, and on Google Play
    Visit our website at beyond-prisons.com
    Join our mailing list for updates on new episodes, events, and more
    Send tips, comments, and questions to beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com
    Kim Wilson is available for speaking engagements and to facilitate workshops. Please contact beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com for more information
    Twitter: @Beyond_Prison
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/beyondprisonspodcast/
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/beyondprisons/

    • 51 min
    David Stein

    David Stein

    Kim Wilson and Brian Sonenstein are joined by historian and abolitionist David Stein for an episode of the Beyond Prisons podcast.
    David penned an excellent article in 2017 with Dan Berger and Mariame Kaba entitled, “What Abolitionists Do." He reflects on this article in this moment of greater awareness of abolition and shares his thoughts and experiences from spending time in abolitionist spaces.
    David Stein is a UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of African American Studies at UCLA. His book manuscript, Fearing Inflation, Inflating Fears: The Civil Rights Struggle for Full Employment and the Rise of the Carceral State, 1929-1986, is forthcoming from University of North Carolina Press. It describes the political economy of unemployment and efforts to win a federal governmental job guarantee, and how this struggle impacted the ascent of mass incarceration. His research focuses on the interconnection between social movements, public policy, and political economy in post-1865 U.S. history.
    He has been a member of Critical Resistance since 2006, though his comments in this interview are not on behalf of the organization.
    Episode Resources "What Abolitionists Do" by Dan Berger, Mariame Kaba, and David Stein
    David Stein's website: https://davidpstein.wordpress.com/
    Follow David on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DavidpStein
    Support Beyond Prisons Support our show and join us on Patreon. Check out our other donation options as well.
    Please listen, subscribe, and rate/review our podcast on iTunes, Spotify, and on Google Play
    Visit our website at beyond-prisons.com
    Join our mailing list for updates on new episodes, events, and more
    Send tips, comments, and questions to beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com
    Kim Wilson is available for speaking engagements and to facilitate workshops. Please contact beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com for more information
    Twitter: @Beyond_Prison
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/beyondprisonspodcast/
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/beyondprisons/

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Dr. Erin Corbett

    Dr. Erin Corbett

    Beyond Prisons host Kim Wilson has a conversation with Dr. Erin Corbett, founder and CEO of Second Chance Educational Alliance, Inc. It's a community-based prison education program in CT. SCEA aims to provide formerly incarcerated men and women with the tools necessary to become fully engaged and contributing citizens.
    Erin has spent almost two decades in education access in a number of roles. With experience in independent school admission, enrichment programs, and postsecondary financial aid, her commitment to expanding postsecondary opportunities for all populations has served as the foundation of her professional endeavors.
    Kim and Erin talk about the benefits of post-secondary education for people in prison and the challenges associated with developing a prison education program. They also explore the issue of teaching without access to technology in a world where technology plays such a vital role in our lives, why higher ed in prison attracts people that fetishize prisoners and are invested in the notions of saviorism, and how the teaching authors like James Baldwin are transformative for some students.
    They conclude the conversation with Erin’s thoughts on what higher ed prison policy needs to focus on, including what questions to ask.
    Episode Resources Feature in the Swarthmore College Alumni Magazine
    Blog Post on MSI Unplugged
    Dr. Corbett on Medium 
    Dr. Corbett on Twitter: @GrandmaCheesy77
    Second Chance Educational Alliance on Twitter: @SCEA_Inc_CT
    Support Beyond Prisons Support our show and join us on Patreon. Check out our other donation options as well.
    Please listen, subscribe, and rate/review our podcast on iTunes, Spotify, and on Google Play
    Visit our website at beyond-prisons.com
    Join our mailing list for updates on new episodes, events, and more
    Send tips, comments, and questions to beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com
    Kim Wilson is available for speaking engagements and to facilitate workshops. Please contact beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com for more information
    Twitter: @Beyond_Prison
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/beyondprisonspodcast/
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/beyondprisons/

    • 59 min
    How Do We Get Through This? feat. Kay Whitlock & Donna Murch

    How Do We Get Through This? feat. Kay Whitlock & Donna Murch

    Donna Murch and Kay Whitlock join Beyond Prisons to think through the question “how do we get through this?”
    Donna posed this question on social media in April as the COVID-19 pandemic peaked and motivated this conversation. We begin by thinking through who the “we” is in that question, and then we attempt to define what we mean by “getting through this."
    Donna points out that racial capitalism and the unraveling of already weak systems is making it clear who the “we” is. Kim shares how this moment has for me triggered an eerie feeling of calmness that is a trauma response to other experiences in my life. And Kay shares how this moment has allowed her to stop pretending and to think about how we can use our collective energy in this moment. 
    We talk about the importance of imagination at this moment and the need to share the testimony of people directly impacted by this crisis.
    Finally, we discuss the rise of authoritarianism and how media reports of COVID-19 are filtered through racial-ethnonational lens. We end our conversation with some thoughts on mutual aid and how this crisis has the potential for teaching us greater responsibility for each other. 
    (Note: this conversation was recorded in April).
    Kay Whitlock, a longtime activist and organizer in progressive social justice movements, lives in Missoula, Montana. She writes frequently on issues of structural violence in U.S. society. She is co-author of Queer (in)Justice: The Criminalization of LGBT People in the United States and Considering Hate: Violence, Goodness & Justice in American Culture and Politics.  She is currently working with sociologist Nancy Heitzeg on a forthcoming book: Prison Break: The Deceptive Terrain of Criminal Justice Reform.  
    Professor Donna Murch’s teaching and research specializations are historical studies of mass incarceration/war on drugs, Black Power and Civil Rights, California, social movements, and postwar U.S. cities. She is currently completing a new trade press book entitled Crack in Los Angeles: Policing the Crisis and the War on Drugs, which explores the militarization of law enforcement, the social history of drug consumption and sale, and the political economy of mass incarceration in late twentieth-century California. In October 2010, Murch published the award-winning monograph Living for the City: Migration, Education and the Rise of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, California with the University of North Carolina Press, which won the Phillis Wheatley prize in December 2011. She has published articles in the Journal of American History, Journal of Urban History, OAH Magazine of History, Black Scholar, Souls, Perspectives, New Politics, and Jacobin.
    Credits Created and hosted by Kim Wilson and Brian Sonenstein
    Edited by Ellis Maxwell
    Website & volunteers managed by Victoria Nam
    Theme music by Jared Ware
    Support Beyond Prisons Support our show and join us on Patreon. Check out our other donation options as well.
    Please listen, subscribe, and rate/review our podcast on iTunes, Spotify, and on Google Play
    Visit our website at beyond-prisons.com
    Contact us at beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com
    Kim Wilson is available for speaking engagements and to facilitate workshops. Contact us at beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com for more information
    Twitter I Facebook I Instagram

    • 1 hr 15 min
    Reflecting On The Protests

    Reflecting On The Protests

    Kim and Brian sit down for an extended conversation on the current Black Lives Matter protests, policing and police reform, media literacy, and more.
    Credits Created and hosted by Kim Wilson and Brian Sonenstein
    Edited by Ellis Maxwell
    Website & volunteers managed by Victoria Nam
    Theme music by Jared Ware
    Support Beyond Prisons Support our show and join us on Patreon. Check out our other donation options as well.
    Please listen, subscribe, and rate/review our podcast on iTunes, Spotify, and on Google Play
    Visit our website at beyond-prisons.com
    Join our mailing list for updates on new episodes, events, and more
    Send tips, comments, and questions to beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com
    Kim Wilson is available for speaking engagements and to facilitate workshops. Please contact beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com for more information
    Twitter: @Beyond_Prison
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/beyondprisonspodcast/
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/beyondprisons/

    • 1 hr 32 min
    Anthony Williams

    Anthony Williams

    Beyond Prisons hosts Brian Sonenstein and Kim Wilson sit down with Anthony Williams to talk about co-founding the hashtag "#MasculinitySoFragile," leveraging social capital online, how their political consciousness evolved over time, and overcoming isolation through reading.
    We recorded this episode in early March just as the pandemic was gaining steam. The subsequent weeks have forced us all to contend with a new reality that intensifies our vulnerability and underscores the need for organizing and collective liberation.
    Anthony talks about cultivating joy as we live with trauma, and tells us why we should all read "Pleasure Activism" by Adrianne Maree Brown. 
    Anthony James Williams is a Black queer non-binary writer, sociology PhD student, and facilitator. Online, they’re responsible for co-creating and popularizing the hashtags #MasculinitySoFragile and #BlackWomenDidThat. Offline, their prior Black student organizing led the University of California system to divest $25 million from private prisons in 2016.
    Find them on Twitter @anthoknees or antjwilliams.com. 
    Episode Resources The painful & personal process of Black Consciousness
    Sandra Bland: Beware the day they change their mind!
    The Year in Creating Black Joy
    social justice work is exhausting: ableism, racism, and joy
    Credits Created and hosted by Kim Wilson and Brian Sonenstein
    Edited by Ellis Maxwell
    Website & volunteers managed by Victoria Nam
    Theme music by Jared Ware
    Support Beyond Prisons Support our show and join us on Patreon. Check out our other donation options as well.
    Please listen, subscribe, and rate/review our podcast on iTunes, Spotify, and on Google Play
    Visit our website at beyond-prisons.com
    Join our mailing list for updates on new episodes, events, and more
    Send tips, comments, and questions to beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com
    Kim Wilson is available for speaking engagements and to facilitate workshops. Please contact beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com for more information
    Twitter: @Beyond_Prison
    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/beyondprisonspodcast/
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/beyondprisons/

    • 1 hr 7 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
141 Ratings

141 Ratings

Avalonrichna ,

nice

I really enjoyed the podmap episode. would like to hear introductions with identities (is this a white cis het man speaking?) to greater contextualize the hosts experiences. thx

The Real Booty Troll ,

Super informative

Amazing podcast

JRW30 ,

Amazing

Such a strong message! I am learning a lot!

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