21 episodes

The exhibition “Bijoux Parisiens” has been produced by the Petit Palais, City of Paris Fine Arts Museum, Paris Musées, in cooperation with the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Nebraska, with additional loans for this showing arranged by the Taft Museum of Art. This audio tour has been made possible through the generosity of the Docents of the Taft Museum of Art.

Bijoux Parisiens Taft Museum of Art

    • Arts

The exhibition “Bijoux Parisiens” has been produced by the Petit Palais, City of Paris Fine Arts Museum, Paris Musées, in cooperation with the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Nebraska, with additional loans for this showing arranged by the Taft Museum of Art. This audio tour has been made possible through the generosity of the Docents of the Taft Museum of Art.

    1. Introduction

    1. Introduction

    The exhibition “Bijoux Parisiens” has been produced by the Petit Palais, City of Paris Fine Arts Museum, Paris Musées, in cooperation with the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Nebraska, with additional loans for this showing arranged by the Taft Museum of Art. This audio tour has been made possible through the generosity of the Docents of the Taft Museum of Art.

    • 1 min
    2. Artist Unknown, Southern Germany, “Charity Pendant,” about 1590–1600

    2. Artist Unknown, Southern Germany, “Charity Pendant,” about 1590–1600

    Worn on a chain, this pendant presents at its center a woman embracing two children, symbolizing the Christian virtue of charity. Some of the gold structure has been decorated with enamel, which is made of ground glass and pigment that produce vivid color when fired in a kiln. French creators also worked in the typical Renaissance style of this German pendant, linking diverse elements together.

    • 2 min
    3. Artist Unknown, Portugal, “Bodice Brooch (Devant de corsage),” about 1760

    3. Artist Unknown, Portugal, “Bodice Brooch (Devant de corsage),” about 1760

    During the reign of Louis XV of France (1715–1774), his courtiers preferred jewelry marked by symmetry and shining white gems. In this piece imported from Portugal, semi-precious stones—quartz and tourmaline—replaced diamonds. Like Pouget’s engravings nearby, this brooch features ribbons, flowers, and pear-shaped drops.

    • 1 min
    4. Artist Unknown, Paris, “Neoclassical Necklace,” about 1800–1810

    4. Artist Unknown, Paris, “Neoclassical Necklace,” about 1800–1810

    In this necklace, the artist elegantly suspended a medallion depicting Athena, goddess of wisdom, from two swans, a symbol associated with Napoleon’s first wife, the Empress Joséphine. Bolstering his own empire, Napoleon I set a new taste for objects based on ancient Roman art. He especially adored antique cameos, small hardstones with figures carved in relief. This enamel plaque replicates a cameo design.

    • 2 min
    5. Artist Unknown, France, “Amethyst Parure (Jewelry Set),” 1820–1830

    5. Artist Unknown, France, “Amethyst Parure (Jewelry Set),” 1820–1830

    The restored monarchy and its court could more easily afford semi-precious stones, such as these amethysts imported from Brazil, than the much costlier rubies, emeralds, or diamonds. The creator of this jewelry set placed amethysts within wide frames of embossed and delicately chiseled gold, which he treated with economical milled edges.

    • 2 min
    6. Jules Wièse, “Bracelet,” about 1855

    6. Jules Wièse, “Bracelet,” about 1855

    In each of the linked gold medallions that compose this bracelet, finely worked silver busts emerge from emerald-green engraved enamel fields. Jules Wièse, the maker of this bracelet, drew inspiration from early Italian Renaissance sculptural busts. Wièse began his career as goldsmith for François-Désiré Froment-Meurice.

    • 2 min

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