42 episodes

As a British Bengali, many of the experiences faced by women I grew up with have slipped through the cracks of mainstream feminism. Brown Don’t Frown Podcast digs deeper to attract an audience who can relate to us, as well as those with entirely new perspectives and experiences to our own, so that we can engage in open conversations without judgement. While by no means exhaustive, Brown Don’t Frown centres around the dissection of trials and tribulations faced by women, with a particular focus on minority and underrepresented women. We’re grateful to be able to share our stories through personal anecdotes, life experiences and many laughs along the way.

Brown Don't Frown Podcast Tania S H

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

As a British Bengali, many of the experiences faced by women I grew up with have slipped through the cracks of mainstream feminism. Brown Don’t Frown Podcast digs deeper to attract an audience who can relate to us, as well as those with entirely new perspectives and experiences to our own, so that we can engage in open conversations without judgement. While by no means exhaustive, Brown Don’t Frown centres around the dissection of trials and tribulations faced by women, with a particular focus on minority and underrepresented women. We’re grateful to be able to share our stories through personal anecdotes, life experiences and many laughs along the way.

    Season 5: Ep 40 - March Muses founders Alison Burton and Natalie Duvall on Dragons’ Den, and balancing entrepreneurialism, motherhood and creativity

    Season 5: Ep 40 - March Muses founders Alison Burton and Natalie Duvall on Dragons’ Den, and balancing entrepreneurialism, motherhood and creativity

    To mark Black History Month, the final guests of season 5 are Alison Burton and Natalie Duvall, founders of March Muses, which produces luxury gifts representing people of colour and received backing from Dragons’ Den’s Peter Jones and Deborah Meaden. They are the only UK brand to have created a full range of Black Christmas decorations, shining the light on the need for diverse and inclusive figurines and baubles at Christmas time. 
    Alison and Natalie are single mums who also have full time day jobs and share their perspectives on balancing entrepreneurialism, motherhood and creativity. 
    It’s important that we raise our children to value diversity, feel visible and see all humans as equal. As mothers of Black daughters, I ask them why representation is particularly important to them.
    Natalie and Alison also frankly share their experiences with motherhood:
    “As a parent, you’re winging it every day, because you don’t know what you’re going to be faced with and you have to find a solution for it at that moment. You could be tired, you could be hungry, you could be fed up, you could be stressed, but you have to find the answer. And you have to come down to their level with the way that you communicate.”
    “The beautiful thing is, you’re always learning from your children…”
    You can follow March Muses on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marchmuses/ Find out more on https://www.marchmuses.co.uk/
    Sign up to our newsletter:  https://mailchi.mp/186e92c0ae06/browndontfrownpodcastnewsletter 
    If you enjoy listening to the podcast, please consider supporting it - all for as little as the price of a coffee! You can donate here: www.patreon.com/browndontfrownpod.
    Follow us on:
    Twitter - @BDFPodcast 
    Instagram - @browndontfrownpodcast 
    Facebook - @browndontfrownpodcast 
    LinkedIn - @browndontfrownpodcast
     

    • 49 min
    Season 5: Ep 39 - Navigating “mum-guilt”, anxiety and life as a stay-at-home mum

    Season 5: Ep 39 - Navigating “mum-guilt”, anxiety and life as a stay-at-home mum

    Katie Pearson is an old classmate from Sixth Form. She talks frankly about life as a stay-at-home mum,  the societal stereotypes and stigma associated with it, “mum guilt” and how she manages her anxiety and negative thoughts. 
    The negative perceptions of stay-at-home mums have been created by women. We are the gatekeepers of this narrative.  It often feels like whatever women do, they’re not good enough. If you’re a working mother, you’re neglecting your children, and if you’re a stay-at-home mother, you’ve failed to achieve your full potential. A lot of women calling themselves feminists are part of the problem of this women-shaming. We ask, do we have a problem with internalised misogyny? 
    Raising children is one of the most undervalued roles in life. Author of Invisible Women, Caroline Criado Perez, says “Women’s unpaid work is work that society depends on, and it is work from which society as a whole benefits[...]The unpaid work that women do isn’t simply a matter of “choice”. It is built into the system we have created – and it could just as easily be built out of it”. ONS analysis of time use data shows that women put in more than double the proportion of unpaid work when it comes to cooking, childcare and housework. I ask Katie whether this resonates with her and she shares her typical day of taking care of her children, and working around the house.
    We round off with Katie sharing the best thing about being a mum, the hardest thing and a piece of advice she’d give to expectant or new mothers: be kind to yourself.
    Sign up to our newsletter:  https://mailchi.mp/186e92c0ae06/browndontfrownpodcastnewsletter 
    If you enjoy listening to the podcast, please consider supporting it - all for as little as the price of a coffee! You can donate here: www.patreon.com/browndontfrownpod.
    Follow us on:
    Twitter - @BDFPodcast 
    Instagram - @browndontfrownpodcast 
    Facebook - @browndontfrownpodcast 
    LinkedIn - @browndontfrownpodcast

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Season 5: EP 38 - In conversation with Jane Chelliah: Feminist mothering, identity loss and empty nest syndrome

    Season 5: EP 38 - In conversation with Jane Chelliah: Feminist mothering, identity loss and empty nest syndrome

    Today’s guest is Jane Chelliah, a South Asian midlife influencer and blogger who talks candidly about motherhood, feminism and transforming the female midlife crisis into a happy phase in life. Jane didn’t always see herself as a mother but found that she was absolutely besotted in love with her daughter when she was born. 
    Jane describes herself as a Feminist mother. I ask her what that means to her and she shares an evocative metaphor: “It’s about putting that oxygen mask on yourself first before putting it on your child, and that way, you can not only be the best version of yourself but you can be the best for your child. It’s about empowered mothering.” 
    Motherhood can make women lose that sense of self, of who they were before they became mothers. When I ask Jane about whether motherhood affected her identity, she explains how it added further dimensions to her ability to be more compassionate and thoughtful towards another human being and for herself too. Contrary to societal preconceptions of motherhood, it actually sharpened her ambition and empowered her to be more motivated. 
    We also examine the “motherhood penalty”, assumptions and prejudices in the workforce, how austerity has rested disproportionately upon mothers from economically deprived groups, and the hollowness that comes with becoming an empty-nester.
    You can read more about Jane on www.amidlferinlondon.com  and www.ambitiousmamas.co.uk.
    Sign up to our newsletter:  https://mailchi.mp/186e92c0ae06/browndontfrownpodcastnewsletter 
    If you enjoy listening to the podcast, please consider supporting it - all for as little as the price of a coffee! You can donate here: www.patreon.com/browndontfrownpod.
    Follow us on:
    Twitter - @BDFPodcast 
    Instagram - @browndontfrownpodcast 
    Facebook - @browndontfrownpodcast 
    LinkedIn - @browndontfrownpodcast

    • 54 min
    Season 5: Ep 37 - Pregnant Then Screwed Founder Joeli Brearley on pregnancy discrimination, fixing childcare and creating a fairer workplace for mothers

    Season 5: Ep 37 - Pregnant Then Screwed Founder Joeli Brearley on pregnancy discrimination, fixing childcare and creating a fairer workplace for mothers

    The first guest of this special series on the joys and challenges of maternity and motherhood, is Joeli Brearley, Founder and Director of Pregnant Then Screwed. It started off as a safe space for mothers to share stories of their pregnancy discrimination and has evolved to become a one-of-a kind charity that lobbies against the gender pay gap, maternity discrimination and aims to be a voice for working mothers.
    Joeli shares striking examples of pregnancy discrimination she’s come across through PTS’s Advice Line and how she’s used these examples to galvanise change in maternity policy. She also talks about the work PTS is doing to reach underserved groups and more Black and Brown women.
    Childcare in the UK has been unfit for purpose for a long time. We ask, how do we fix the system? And how can we better engage with employers to encourage them to make their workplaces the best they can be for working parents?
    We finish with Joeli sharing her thoughts on the best thing about being a mum and the hardest thing, and one piece of advice she’d give to expectant or new mothers.
    You can join the March of the Mummies protest on childcare reform and better parental leave on 29 October, taking place across 11 cities in the UK: https://pregnantthenscrewed.com/event-march-of-the-mummies/ 
    RESET 2022 Online Festival of motherhood and mental health takes place from 12 - 16 September: https://pregnantthenscrewed.com/reset-2022-festival-of-motherhood-and-mental-health/ 
    Follow Pregnant Then Screwed:
    Instagram - @pregnant_then_screwed
    Twitter - @PregnantScrewed
    Sign up to our newsletter:  https://mailchi.mp/186e92c0ae06/browndontfrownpodcastnewsletter 
    If you enjoy listening to the podcast, please consider supporting it - all for as little as the price of a coffee! You can donate here: www.patreon.com/browndontfrownpod.
    Follow us on:
    Twitter - @BDFPodcast 
    Instagram - @browndontfrownpodcast 
    Facebook - @browndontfrownpodcast 
    LinkedIn - @browndontfrownpodcast

    • 51 min
    TRAILER - Season 5

    TRAILER - Season 5

    Brown Don’t Frown is back! Season 5 drops September 2022! Make sure you hit the subscribe button and you will be notified as soon as a new episode goes live. 
    Inspired by my own personal journey with pregnancy and motherhood, this will be a special series covering the joys and challenges of motherhood and maternity, empowering change in childcare, mental health and the workforce.
    Sign up to our newsletter: https://mailchi.mp/186e92c0ae06/browndontfrownpodcastnewsletter. 
    If you enjoy listening to the podcast, please consider supporting it - all for as little as the price of a coffee! You can donate here: www.patreon.com/browndontfrownpod.
    You can find us on:Twitter - @BDFPodcast Instagram - @browndontfrownpodcast Facebook - @browndontfrownpodcast LinkedIn - @browndontfrownpodcast

    • 1 min
    Season 4: Ep 36 - Dina Begum on the symbolism of food, Bangladeshi hospitality and our favourite dishes

    Season 4: Ep 36 - Dina Begum on the symbolism of food, Bangladeshi hospitality and our favourite dishes

    The final episode of season 4 is here and joining us is Dina Begum, a British-Bangladeshi cook and writer who is passionate about highlighting the underrepresented recipes and authentic food traditions of Bangladesh.
    For Bengalis and Bangladeshis, and across much of the South Asian continent, food is inseparable from humanity, community, purpose and love. I ask Dina why food is so important to her and whether she always saw herself as a cook. Food is a very visceral experience. Flavours, spices or certain dishes can be nostalgic if we associate them with a particular memory or event. Food can symbolise traditions, rekindle a sense of identity and bring people together; that’s why Bengali hospitality is second to none. We look at why food is so critical to familial spaces and what it symbolises for us.
    In the UK, most of what we class as “Indian food”, is curated by Bangladeshi restaurant owners and chefs. The recognition and appreciation for homemade-style food and the desire to seek out unique flavours is a more recent phenomenon which has empowered the Bangladeshi diaspora to spotlight their cuisine, rather than grouping it under “Indian” or “curry”.  Dina has written about how recipes are passed down from one generation to the next, usually not by writing them down, but by demonstrating. We consider the contrast between the observation/estimation styles of Bangladeshi cooking versus the meticulous measurements in English recipes.  Finally, we talk about our favourite Bangladeshi dishes and our three staple spices for the kitchen.
    You can follow Dina on Twitter: @dinasfoodstory.

    • 1 hr 6 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

TheBittenWordPodcast ,

Very Educational

This podcast is extremely engaging and enlightening. There are a wide range of topics that are all very interesting, and I appreciate hearing so many new perspectives on topics I’d never have thought to explore.

Bilbo639461 ,

Enlightening podcast

Very refreshing to hear different opinions and thoughts on current affairs and more. Tania is a very eloquent podcast host.

AnaayaP ,

Very relatable!

Being an Indian immigrant woman, I related to every conversation in each episode so much. I listened to the discussion on never have I ever and everything that they said is so true and so relatable. I encourage everyone to listen to this podcasts..i have subscribes to their podcast!

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