100 episodes

Rob and Lee Moore talk about Chinese Literature.

Chinese Literature Podcast Rob and Lee Moore

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.7 • 28 Ratings

Rob and Lee Moore talk about Chinese Literature.

    Chen Qiufan - Waste Tide - Part II

    Chen Qiufan - Waste Tide - Part II

    In this episode, Part Two of our two part series on Chen Qiufan's first novel, Rob and Lee try to pivot away from the narrower discussions of what happens in the novel and more on a broader discussion of its place in Chinese Science Fiction. Whether or not they succeed in doing that...well, we'll let you decide.

    • 15 min
    Chen Qiufan - Waste Tide - Part 1

    Chen Qiufan - Waste Tide - Part 1

    This is part 一 in a two part series on the novel called Wast Tide. This is Chen Qiufan's first novel, its a science-fiction novel that touches on environmentalism and transhumanism. Join Rob and Lee as the struggle with this novel .

    • 16 min
    Mei Yaochen - Sacrificing for My Cat

    Mei Yaochen - Sacrificing for My Cat

    How many cats have been immortalized in poetry that we are still reading a millenium later? At least one, Mr. Five White. Here, we stand with Mei Yaochen as he gives Mr. Five White the appropriate send off after his death. 

    • 21 min
    Pu Liye - Chairman Xi's Backside is Where My Gaze Lies

    Pu Liye - Chairman Xi's Backside is Where My Gaze Lies

    This week, we get back to our weird poetry series. Today's weird poem is one written by an editor at the Xinhua News Agency, China's state-sponsored answer to Reuters or Bloomberg. Chairman Xi visited Xinhua and told them that the news needed to support the Party. During the visit, Pu wrote this poem, showing that he definitely supports the Party. 

    • 16 min
    Li Peng Step Down!

    Li Peng Step Down!

    This week's weird poem is weird in an unexpectedly weird way. Upon first glance, it is an anodyne poem published in the overseas edition of the People's Daily, the official rag of the CCP. Until you see the political message hidden in the poem that caused a small controversy in the 1990's.
    This is the last of our weird poem series. 

    • 18 min
    San Francisco Poets - Show Me the Money

    San Francisco Poets - Show Me the Money

    One San Francisco poet, writing in the early 20th century, wrote something that no other poet ever said in the history of Chinese literature (probably): having money is more important than having sons! This is a huge statement that runs against much of traditional Chinese thinking. But, this anonymous poet, though writing in a mixture of Cantonese and Classical Chinese, is an American, so it makes sense. Join Rob and Lee for their look at this poem published in either 1911 or 1915 in San Francisco's Chinatown. 

    • 12 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
28 Ratings

28 Ratings

Lysendis ,

Great Literature Podcast

Glad I found this podast, and really like it. Good to see these works being discussed as literature - not just as historyical, works in English. Lots of ideas for further reading. Thanks.

lucemontes ,

An inspiring show

Thank you for putting on such a brilliant show. It’s light hearted, succinct, and intelligent. What I admire the most from the show is that you are both eloquent and witty. You made literature so interesting and motivating. I’m a scholar myself and making my own show, which can’t be compared with yours, as I’m struggling with English expression and lacking of the suaveness of your hosting style. English is not my native language, so my show is heavily scripted. As a Chinese national, I identify with your expertise in Chinese lit and I strongly recommend this show to my other scholar friends who’s studying and teaching in the US. Also, thank you for bringing so much inspiration for me to improve my own show.

SoloPocono ,

Titillating for us Nerds!

My dear, recently deceased Son (31 from a COVID-stroke), spent over 12 years traveling to and through China. He’d returned to the US for his MBA 3 years ago and had just gotten his VISA renewed to return when he died. As a result of my Son’s love for China, her culture, history and most of al,, the people; I have a large bookcase of books, (literature, language, history, calligraphy, CBP, poetry, etc).
A Dictionary of Maqiao by Han Shaogong is one of my few not Liu Xin, classics or Tang poetry, books. One of my Son’s friends has a Nainai 奶奶👵🏼, Lili, who taught at Stanford for 30yrs, before retiring back to Chengdu. I credit Lili with most of my education about China, before she suffered a health crisis a few years ago. She sent me this book. Perhaps it’s my own bias; but reading this book reminds me of reading James Joyce, Finnegan’s Wake, my senior year of High School. I’m STILL trying to get through it. 😂

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