100 episodes

Rob and Lee Moore talk about Chinese Literature.

Chinese Literature Podcast Rob and Lee Moore

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.7 • 29 Ratings

Rob and Lee Moore talk about Chinese Literature.

    Zhuangzi's Dead Wife

    Zhuangzi's Dead Wife

    Death is tough to grapple with, but it is a reality we, all to often, face the wrong way. In this episode, we take a look at how Zhuangzi, the famed Warring States philosopher, mourns his dead wife. 

    • 18 min
    Mr. Uighur

    Mr. Uighur

    Where did the Uighur name come from? It might seem crazy, but a poet in the 1930's took Uighur as his penname, and the Uighur people may have taken their name from that man (well, it is a little bit more complicated than that, but those are the basics). Abdukhaliq Uighur called on his people to rise up against the Chinese and become the Uighur people. We look at a poem that he wrote when he was facing execution in in Chinese prison cell. 

    • 22 min
    Xi Xi - Floating City

    Xi Xi - Floating City

    Xi Xi, one of Hong Kong's most famous writers, pens a weird, postmodern portrait of Hong Kong. Rob does not like it, Lee does. Why? Take a listen as they tackle this weird and sometimes wonderful effort to deal with what Hong Kong is. Or, is it even Hong Kong?

    • 17 min
    Mencius

    Mencius

    This week, we tackle the biggest question in Confucianism: are people born good and made bad by their environment, or are they inherently bad and only made good through rules and punishments. We look at a passage in the Mencius, arguably the most important text in the Confucian tradition (yes, maybe even more important the Confucius himself). We are looking at the passage from Book 6 A, Passage # 6. 

    • 18 min
    Shi Zhi - The Wave and the Ocean

    Shi Zhi - The Wave and the Ocean

    Today, we take a look at a poet who, astonishingly, was writing interesting poetry during the height of the Maoist era. His is the most underground of the underground poets, and today we look at one of the poems by Shi Zhi, "The Ocean and the Wave."

    • 23 min
    Li Bai - Let's Party

    Li Bai - Let's Party

    Can Li Bai, China's greatest poet, be translated into frat-boy-ese? Lee tried. 
    It is not as crazy as it sounds. Li Bai is an alcoholic poet. Though he has long been translated into a highfalutin English that sounds like a stuffy Shakespere. But Li Bai is just talking about getting drunk. 
    Does Lee's translation work? Stay tuned and decide for yourself. 

    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

Lysendis ,

Great Literature Podcast

Glad I found this podast, and really like it. Good to see these works being discussed as literature - not just as historyical, works in English. Lots of ideas for further reading. Thanks.

lucemontes ,

An inspiring show

Thank you for putting on such a brilliant show. It’s light hearted, succinct, and intelligent. What I admire the most from the show is that you are both eloquent and witty. You made literature so interesting and motivating. I’m a scholar myself and making my own show, which can’t be compared with yours, as I’m struggling with English expression and lacking of the suaveness of your hosting style. English is not my native language, so my show is heavily scripted. As a Chinese national, I identify with your expertise in Chinese lit and I strongly recommend this show to my other scholar friends who’s studying and teaching in the US. Also, thank you for bringing so much inspiration for me to improve my own show.

SoloPocono ,

Titillating for us Nerds!

My dear, recently deceased Son (31 from a COVID-stroke), spent over 12 years traveling to and through China. He’d returned to the US for his MBA 3 years ago and had just gotten his VISA renewed to return when he died. As a result of my Son’s love for China, her culture, history and most of al,, the people; I have a large bookcase of books, (literature, language, history, calligraphy, CBP, poetry, etc).
A Dictionary of Maqiao by Han Shaogong is one of my few not Liu Xin, classics or Tang poetry, books. One of my Son’s friends has a Nainai 奶奶👵🏼, Lili, who taught at Stanford for 30yrs, before retiring back to Chengdu. I credit Lili with most of my education about China, before she suffered a health crisis a few years ago. She sent me this book. Perhaps it’s my own bias; but reading this book reminds me of reading James Joyce, Finnegan’s Wake, my senior year of High School. I’m STILL trying to get through it. 😂

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