22 episodes

The weather's weird, water's warming, sea levels are rising and reefs are bleaching – Climate change is here to stay. But not all is lost. Join Civil Beat as it finds the problems and their solvers, from land to sea, soil to sky.

Civil Beat Presents: Stemming The Tide Honolulu Civil Beat

    • News
    • 5.0 • 26 Ratings

The weather's weird, water's warming, sea levels are rising and reefs are bleaching – Climate change is here to stay. But not all is lost. Join Civil Beat as it finds the problems and their solvers, from land to sea, soil to sky.

    Climate Change Will Claim Some Places, But Here’s How We Can Deal

    Climate Change Will Claim Some Places, But Here’s How We Can Deal

    Rising tides and temperatures will transform Oahu's most northwestern point, but how can we preserve the cultural and historical resources that call Kaena home?

    • 8 min
    Hawaiian Fishponds Are Rebounding In The Face Of Rising Seas

    Hawaiian Fishponds Are Rebounding In The Face Of Rising Seas

    Ancient Hawaiian fishponds are experiencing a resurgence, but can they withstand the detrimental effects of climate change? In this episode, we explore how extreme weather conditions not only affect the fish, but also the community stewards bringing back this traditional practice.

    • 8 min
    How Helping Seabirds Helps Us All

    How Helping Seabirds Helps Us All

    The millions of seabirds that call Hawaii home mostly live in the far-flung Northeastern Hawaiian Islands, away from humans and predators. But they are facing an uncertain future, as the low-lying islands on which they nest are being consumed by sea level rise, their nests are being washed away in weather events and they're suffering as the temperatures get hotter. But over the past few decades, environmental groups have been helping bring them back to Hawaii's main islands and the benefits could be shared by all. 

    • 10 min
    What Seaweed Can Tell Us About Our Environment

    What Seaweed Can Tell Us About Our Environment

    Seaweed, macroalgae, kelp - there are many different names for the plants of the ocean but in Hawaii, it’s known as limu. In this episode we look at how scientists are using limu to monitor environmental changes happening in the ocean and on land.

    • 9 min
    How Bullets And Arrows Are Battling Climate Change

    How Bullets And Arrows Are Battling Climate Change

    Axis deer were introduced to Hawaii more than 100 years ago and, ever since, they have become a plague on Hawaii's environment and food system.
    While many have spoken about eradicating the animals from the island, they have become part of the food system for hunters. Consciously or not, hunters have become part of the solution to the problem.
    Follow father-son duo Hunter and Fisher Betts as they hunt for deer on Maui.

    • 12 min
    The surprising way soil can combat climate change

    The surprising way soil can combat climate change

    Healthy soil is not just good for Hawaii’s farmers, but it can also help the state combat climate change. In more ways than one.

    • 8 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
26 Ratings

26 Ratings

ckc31289 ,

Amazing

I really enjoy learning from Claire every week how I can make a difference and what is hurting the environment.

mlmim ,

it's that good

Doomed this pod cast is not! So interesting and so much information in such a short time. The sound was amazing and Claire's style is terrific. Even if hawaii is not home, the information is relatable to main landers. Amyone interested in the environment should make this a "go to" pod cast

_mace_ ,

Very interesting!

I just listened to the first episode and it was great! It was clear, to the point, and interesting. I especially liked that they touched on the societal changes that need to happen involving climate change, instead of just focusing on individual changes, as that is something that I think is not talked about often enough. Overall a very interesting listen!

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