91 episodes

Clearing a New Path™ podcast looks to build a more united, feminist, anti-oppressive rural Canada.
Produced by Radar Media.
Podcast art inspired by the graphic design of Katie Wilhelm.
Music branding by The Hankering Studio.
Subscribe to the Clearing a New Path™ weekly newsletter: https://substack.com/@clearinganewpath
Contact us at: info@clearinganewpathpodcast.com

Clearing a New Path‪™‬ Radar Media

    • News

Clearing a New Path™ podcast looks to build a more united, feminist, anti-oppressive rural Canada.
Produced by Radar Media.
Podcast art inspired by the graphic design of Katie Wilhelm.
Music branding by The Hankering Studio.
Subscribe to the Clearing a New Path™ weekly newsletter: https://substack.com/@clearinganewpath
Contact us at: info@clearinganewpathpodcast.com

    Janan McNaughton - Proof Line Farm Creamery and Farm Market - Aligning Values with Business

    Janan McNaughton - Proof Line Farm Creamery and Farm Market - Aligning Values with Business

    Janan McNaughton had a PhD in social work, worked in that industry, was a researcher, freelance writer and travelled the world. So how did she end up opening Proof Line Farm Creamery and Farm Market in rural Ontario?

    Janan talks about her experience moving from the city to a rural community and the culture shock she experienced. She shares the journey she and her family have had starting a farm creamery and farm market and the challenges she/they faced in navigating the food system and government regulations.

    She talks about the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion and how these conversations were common in her social work world, but more challenging in a rural context.

    She emphasizes the need for urban and rural communities to connect and work together in the local food system and how partnership building and finding the right resources aligned with the farm's values are crucial for success.

    Janan also highlights the need for clarity and intentionality in pursuing a business that provides personal satisfaction and has a positive impact. You have to start with a mission, values and then any relationships you enter into, any choices you make, will align.

    Janan gives a shout out to her business coach, Chelsey Hart at Your Initiative Co.

    • 54 min
    Kerri Neil - Co-chair, Social Justice Co-operative Newfoundland and Labrador

    Kerri Neil - Co-chair, Social Justice Co-operative Newfoundland and Labrador

    Summary

    Kerri Neil, co-chair of Social Justice Cooperative Newfoundland and Labrador, discusses the formation and work of the cooperative. The organization operates as a member-run, non-profit cooperative focused on social and environmental justice. They advocate for feminism, decolonization, and care for individuals, the land, and all living beings. The cooperative primarily consists of individual members, with a few organizations also involved. They prioritize financial independence and rely on monthly donations from members and community supporters. The cooperative engages in a wide range of activism, including disability justice, women's equality, Indigenous activism, and more. They emphasize the importance of mutual aid and building relationships within the community.

    Takeaways

    Social Justice Cooperative Newfoundland and Labrador is a member-run, non-profit cooperative focused on social and environmental justice.The cooperative advocates for feminism, decolonization, and care for individuals, the land, and all living beings.Financial independence is prioritized, with monthly donations from members and community supporters funding the organization.The cooperative engages in a wide range of activism, including disability justice, women's equality, Indigenous activism, and more.
    Chapters

    00:00 Introduction and Background
    02:12 Formation of Social Justice Cooperative
    03:36 Membership and Organizational Structure
    04:59 Transition to Virtual Organization
    05:22 Importance of Cooperative Model
    06:45 Funding and Financial Independence
    08:09 Understanding Social Justice
    09:12 Diverse Range of Activism
    10:40 Challenges and Critiques
    11:18 Vision for a Post-Capitalist, Post-Colonial World
    12:31 Long-Term Planning and Growth
    15:17 Navigating Resistance and Ensuring Safety
    18:57 Importance of Mutual Aid
    20:41 Gaining Supporters and Building Relationships
    22:21 Getting Started in Activism
    24:35 Taking Care of Yourself and Others
    28:31 Lessons Learned and Financial Oversight

    • 44 min
    Agamani (Mani) Chakrabarty - ASBB Economics and Research - Rural Economics

    Agamani (Mani) Chakrabarty - ASBB Economics and Research - Rural Economics

    Summary
    Mani Chakrabarty grew up in Yellowknife, NWT, where she found her desire to make a social impact through looking at world problems with a community-oriented lens.

    She has a business degree and a master's degree in Economics from the University of Alberta and a master's in Comparative Politics from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

    Mani's work experience spans both the public and private sectors. She was an economist with Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) and, most recently, a Senior Consultant with Deloitte.

    Mani is pleased to call Yarmouth, NS her current home.

    In this conversation, Mani Chakrabarty from ASBB Economics and Research discusses the importance of humanizing economics and the work her organization does to provide evidence-based research to clients.

    She shares her personal journey and motivation for focusing on rural communities, highlighting the potential for growth and the strengths of rural areas.

    Mani also addresses the challenges and weaknesses faced by rural communities, such as the need for affordable housing and improved infrastructure.

    She emphasizes the importance of employment in rural areas and the role it plays in providing purpose and dignity.

    Mani discusses the need to address systemic issues and social stigma in rural communities and encourages curiosity and understanding as a way to combat ignorance and build trust.

    She concludes by expressing her hope for the future of rural communities, emphasizing the importance of contentment and community-oriented values.

    Takeaways
    Humanizing economics is essential for understanding the socioeconomic factors that shape individuals' lives and for collaboratively solving systematic issues.Rural communities have the potential for growth and offer unique strengths, such as strong community support and a conducive environment for creativity and innovation.Challenges faced by rural communities include the need for affordable housing, improved infrastructure, and diverse employment opportunities.Addressing systemic issues and social stigma in rural communities requires curiosity, understanding, and building trust.Contentment and community-oriented values are important for the well-being and sustainability of rural communities.

    • 41 min
    Andrew Button - MashUp Lab

    Andrew Button - MashUp Lab

    Andrew Button - MashUp Lab

    I first met Andrew Button from MashUp Lab over the phone. He was inquiring about the national conference the organization I was working with, Community Futures Ontario, was hosting and how he could become a speaker. That was in the throes of the pandemic.

    Andrew and I caught up again recently to chat about how he’s supporting entrepreneurs in rural Canada (and the US), what is missing for many rural communities and some of the opportunities they have at the start of a New Year.
    After a 15-year career working in rural communities with various innovation, businesses, and economic development organizations, Andrew founded Mashup Lab in 2014.

    Mashup Vision: A world where EVERY person in a rural place has the opportunity to unleash their full potential.

    Identifying a gap in resources and a need for support in his community, Andrew has since launched a community of 3 co-working spaces for freelancers, entrepreneurs and independents in the south shore under the brand WorkEvolved.

    Andrew is from a small rural community in Newfoundland and married a girl from a small rural community in Nova Scotia that they now call home with their two boys

    Summary

    Andrew Button from Mashup Lab discusses the challenges faced by rural and remote communities in Canada and the US. He highlights the importance of addressing equity and systemic barriers and shares his personal growth journey in understanding and addressing these issues. Andrew also talks about the role of co-working spaces in rural communities and the potential of social innovation and social business models. He emphasizes the need for open-mindedness, collaboration, and taking small steps to create positive change in rural communities. The conversation explores the importance of taking the first step and the potential for surprising ourselves with what we can achieve.

    Takeaways

    Addressing equity and systemic barriers is crucial for supporting entrepreneurship in rural and remote communities.Personal growth and learning are essential for understanding and addressing these challenges.Co-working spaces can play a significant role in fostering entrepreneurship and collaboration in rural communities.Social innovation and social business models offer opportunities for solving social challenges in a sustainable and profitable way.Open-mindedness, collaboration, and taking small steps can lead to positive change in rural communities. Success stories often start with one person taking the first step.Opportunities arise when we take action without expectations.We can achieve more than we think in a short period of time.
    Chapters

    00:00 Introduction to Mashup Lab
    03:01 Challenges Faced by Rural and Remote Communities
    06:33 Equity and Systemic Barriers
    10:53 Personal Growth and Learning
    13:41 Healing Communities through Personal Growth
    16:25 Barriers and Opportunities in Rural Communities
    20:21 Co-Working Spaces in Rural Communities
    27:22 Understanding Social Innovation and Social Business Models
    33:17 Bartering and Mutual Aid in Entrepreneurship
    40:18 Progress in Rural and Remote Communities
    44:25 Goals for 2024
    46:06 Finding Opportunities in Your Community
    48:28 Taking the First Step
    49:03 Surprising Ourselves

    • 53 min
    Elder Cindy Crowe - Sacred Circles

    Elder Cindy Crowe - Sacred Circles

    Elder Cindy Crowe - Sacred Circles

    This is the third time I have had the pleasure of speaking with Elder Cindy Crowe for a podcast episode, however, I speak with her often as she is my mentor, a dear friend and my chosen family.

    Cindy is an Anishinaabe Grandmother Elder, a Knowledge Keeper, a Lodgekeeper, a Pipe Carrier and a Drum Keeper.

    Cindy is from Opwaaganisiniing close to Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. She is called to connect Indigenous & non-Indigenous folks, as well as support the relationship between Spirit & our human experience. Through her Anishnaabe lens, Cindy holds space for belonging & interconnectedness through vulnerable storytelling & unconditional acceptance.

    I have had the benefit of participating in one of Cindy’s Sacred Circles for almost a year. It is a weekly date I rarely miss. And it has literally healed me and changed my life.

    Cindy is now hosting virtual circles twice a week and we talked about what circles are, what makes them sacred, who can host them and how they can heal communities.

    Summary

    In this conversation, Cindy Crowe, an Identity and Purpose Coach, discusses the concept of sacred circles and their significance in creating a sense of belonging and connection. She explains that sacred circles provide a space where individuals can feel loved, accepted, and free from judgment. Cindy emphasizes that anyone can host a sacred circle as long as they approach it with an open heart and the belief that everyone is equal. She also explores the roles of knowledge keepers and lodge keepers in facilitating circles and highlights the importance of inclusivity in community healing. Cindy encourages individuals to focus on self-healing and love, as well as to foster a sense of unity and collaboration within their communities.

    Takeaways

    Sacred circles provide a space where individuals can feel loved, accepted, and free from judgment.Anyone can host a sacred circle as long as they approach it with an open heart and the belief that everyone is equal.Knowledge keepers and lodge keepers play important roles in facilitating circles and passing down wisdom.Inclusivity is crucial in community healing, and circles should be open to people of all backgrounds.Focusing on self-healing, love, and fostering unity within communities can lead to positive change and a brighter future.

    • 48 min
    The Coxes: Rural Ontario in Colour

    The Coxes: Rural Ontario in Colour

    The Coxes: Rural Ontario in Colour

    This episode, I again handed the microphone to folks who share a lens I do not have.

    This is an intergenerational conversation, from a mom and son, whose experience and perspective is, as people of colour, who once lived in urban settings and now have moved to the country.

    Mojdeh and her son Darius talk about safety, access to cultural food, infrastructure, climate and agriculture among a number of other topics. The two have recently gone into business together with their consulting agency, Cox & Co, a full scale values-driven firm providing strategic advisory services, training and skills building, and specializing in ethical governance and deep anti-oppression.

    Mojdeh Cox is an award-winning consultant, convener and facilitator who is nationally recognized for her expertise in anti-oppression and human rights. 

    For over a decade, Mojdeh has coached organizational and community leaders, businesses and not-for-profit organizations across all sectors on re-imagining their work through a heightened equity lens rooted in social justice, from organizing and convening the largest equity-based lobby on Parliament Hill on Indigenous rights and justice for the Canadian Labour Congress, to facilitating consultations leading to the co-creation of the Community Diversity and Inclusion Strategy (CDIS) for the City of London. 

    Most recently, Mojdeh’s thought leadership on Radical Accountability has been nationally recognized in her tenure as President and CEO of Pillar Nonprofit Network. 

    Mojdeh currently lives in the county with her partner, their four children (including Darius) and their not-so-mini Mini Goldendoodle, Leo.

    Darius Cox was born and mostly raised in London and is currently a King’s University College, Western University student majoring in Political Science and minoring in Sociology. 

    With a passion for learning and leadership, Darius has been a leading delegate in the North Meets South Exchange where youth create a policy framework to draw attention to issues facing Indigenous peoples in Northern Ontario after learning first-hand of the culture and experiences. 

    Darius has also been a delegate at the Smart Start Youth Summit centred around developing leadership and ethics competencies to work on building your future. 

    During highschool he had a leading role in a program called “MANUP”, addressing toxic masculinity and emphasizing respect towards others, especially women. He also sits on the board for the Gender Equality Coalition of Ontario as the youth chair.

    • 57 min

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