211 episodes

Host Amanda Lee McCarty (she/they) decodes and demystifies the fashion and retail industries, and takes on topics like consumerism, workers rights, personal style, and why fashion is a case study in capitalism gone awry.
Your money is as powerful as your vote!
"If you wear clothes, you need to listen to Clotheshorse." --Elise
"If you are human and live in the world, you need to listen to Clotheshorse." --Individually Wrapped

Clotheshorse with Amanda Lee McCarty Support Clotheshorse!

    • Arts
    • 4.9 • 230 Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

Host Amanda Lee McCarty (she/they) decodes and demystifies the fashion and retail industries, and takes on topics like consumerism, workers rights, personal style, and why fashion is a case study in capitalism gone awry.
Your money is as powerful as your vote!
"If you wear clothes, you need to listen to Clotheshorse." --Elise
"If you are human and live in the world, you need to listen to Clotheshorse." --Individually Wrapped

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    Episode 199: Is There REALLY No Ethical Consumption Under Capitalism?

    Episode 199: Is There REALLY No Ethical Consumption Under Capitalism?

    If you dare to dive into the comments section on just about any post about fast fashion or fast everything, you are guaranteed to see more than one person saying "there's no ethical consumption under capitalism."  This episode is part one in a recurring series examining and debunking the most common “excuses” and justifications we see for supporting, maybe even protecting(?) fast fashion and fast everything.  And this week we are getting started with a real banger: “there’s no ethical consumption under capitalism.”  
    We will explore the following questions:
    What is the origin of "there's no ethical consumption under capitalism?" Who said it first?What was intended meaning of this statement and how does it differ from how it is most frequently used now?Why do people use this phrase so often?How should we interact with people who use it?How can we make more ethical choices in a system that is inherently unethical?On our journey to answer these questions, we'll get to talk about feminist tees (again), visit an island nation in the Indian Ocean with a once-robust apparel production industry, buy some new underwear, and unpack how K-cups are a great example of individuals having an impact.
    Additional reading:
    "'Feminist' T-Shirt Backed By Women's Group Made In Sweatshop: Report," Eleanor Goldberg, Huff Post.Where does "there is no such thing as ethical consumption under capitalism" come from?, Reddit thread."This feminist t-shirt isn't actually made in a sweatshop," Zing Tsjeng, Dazed."This is what development looks like," Maya Forstater.
    Episode 200 is coming soon! April 18th at 8pm Eastern.
    Behind the Seams
    If you want to share your opinion/additional thoughts on the subjects we cover in each episode, feel free to email, whether it’s a typed out message or an audio recording:  amanda@clotheshorse.world
    Did you enjoy this episode? Consider "buying me a coffee" via Ko-fi: ko-fi.com/clotheshorse
    Find this episode's transcript (and so much more) at clotheshorsepodcast.com
    Clotheshorse is brought to you with support from the following sustainable small businesses:
    ​High Energy Vintage is a fun and funky vintage shop located in Somerville, MA, just a few minutes away from downtown Boston. They offer a highly curated selection of bright and colorful clothing and accessories from the 1940s-1990s for people of all genders. Husband-and-wife duo Wiley & Jessamy handpick each piece for quality and style, with a focus on pieces that transcend trends and will find a home in your closet for many years to come! In addition to clothing, the shop also features a large selection of vintage vinyl and old school video games. Find them on instagram @ highenergyvintage, online at highenergyvintage.com, and at markets in and around Boston.
    The Pewter Thimble Is there a little bit of Italy in your soul? Are you an enthusiast of pre-loved decor and accessories? Bring vintage Italian style — and history — into your space with The Pewter Thimble (@thepewterthimble). We source useful and beautiful things, and mend them where needed. We also find gorgeous illustrations, and make them print-worthy. Tarot cards, tea towels and handpicked treasures, available to you from the comfort of your own home. Responsibly sourced from across Rome, lovingly renewed by fairly paid artists and artisans, with something for every budget. Discover more at thepewterthimble.com
    St. Evens is an NYC-based vintage shop that is dedicated to bringing you those special pieces you’ll reach for again and again. More than just a store, St. Evens is dedicated to sharing the stories and history behind the garments. 10% of all sales are donated to a different charitable organization each month.  New vintage is released every Thursday at wearStEvens.com, with previews of new pieces and more brought to you on Instagram at @wear_st.evens.
    Deco Denim is a startup based out of San Francisco, selling clothing and accessories that are sustainable, gender fluid, size incl

    • 1 hr 23 min
    Episode 198: How To Talk About Slow Fashion

    Episode 198: How To Talk About Slow Fashion

    How do we get people to join our community and work for change alongside us? By talking about slow fashion, fast fashion, and overconsumption! But starting these conversations can be intimidating.  And frustrating to continue! Have YOU ever tried to change minds in the comment section of a social media post?!  Fortunately Amanda has learned a lot about how to have productive conversations about slow fashion over the last four years, mostly by trial and error.  In this episode she shares what she has learned.  
    This episode answers the following questions (and more):
    Why is it important to talk about fast fashion/slow fashion with the people in your life?Who should care about fast fashion/slow fashion?How do I start these conversations without being a total party pooper?How do I meet people where they are (and avoid using shaming or blaming language)?How do I deal with common responses like "talking about fast fashion is classist" or "there's no ethical consumption under capitalism?"What can I learn by sharing my knowledges and experience with others?Episode 200 is coming soon! April 18th at 8pm Eastern.
    Behind the Seams
    If you want to share your opinion/additional thoughts on the subjects we cover in each episode, feel free to email, whether it’s a typed out message or an audio recording:  amanda@clotheshorse.world
    Did you enjoy this episode? Consider "buying me a coffee" via Ko-fi: ko-fi.com/clotheshorse
    Find this episode's transcript (and so much more) at clotheshorsepodcast.com
    Clotheshorse is brought to you with support from the following sustainable small businesses:
    ​High Energy Vintage is a fun and funky vintage shop located in Somerville, MA, just a few minutes away from downtown Boston. They offer a highly curated selection of bright and colorful clothing and accessories from the 1940s-1990s for people of all genders. Husband-and-wife duo Wiley & Jessamy handpick each piece for quality and style, with a focus on pieces that transcend trends and will find a home in your closet for many years to come! In addition to clothing, the shop also features a large selection of vintage vinyl and old school video games. Find them on instagram @ highenergyvintage, online at highenergyvintage.com, and at markets in and around Boston.
    The Pewter Thimble Is there a little bit of Italy in your soul? Are you an enthusiast of pre-loved decor and accessories? Bring vintage Italian style — and history — into your space with The Pewter Thimble (@thepewterthimble). We source useful and beautiful things, and mend them where needed. We also find gorgeous illustrations, and make them print-worthy. Tarot cards, tea towels and handpicked treasures, available to you from the comfort of your own home. Responsibly sourced from across Rome, lovingly renewed by fairly paid artists and artisans, with something for every budget. Discover more at thepewterthimble.com
    St. Evens is an NYC-based vintage shop that is dedicated to bringing you those special pieces you’ll reach for again and again. More than just a store, St. Evens is dedicated to sharing the stories and history behind the garments. 10% of all sales are donated to a different charitable organization each month.  New vintage is released every Thursday at wearStEvens.com, with previews of new pieces and more brought to you on Instagram at @wear_st.evens.
    Deco Denim is a startup based out of San Francisco, selling clothing and accessories that are sustainable, gender fluid, size inclusive and high quality--made to last for years to come. Deco Denim is trying to change the way you think about buying clothes. Founder Sarah Mattes wants to empower people to ask important questions like, “Where was this made? Was this garment made ethically? Is this fabric made of plastic? Can this garment be upcycled and if not, can it be recycled?” Signup at decodenim.com to receive $20 off your first purchase. They promise not to spam you and send out no more than 3 emails a month, with 2 o

    • 1 hr 47 min
    Episode 197: Responsible Travel with Desirée and Ginger

    Episode 197: Responsible Travel with Desirée and Ginger

    There is no question that travel impacts both our planet and its people.  Yet it's also an amazing opportunity to explore both ourselves and world, while deepening our understanding for the other humans sharing this planet. Can we travel more responsibly, finding a balance between ethics and exploration?  Amanda is joined by Desirée of The Pewter Thimble and travel writer/educator Ginger to break it down. 
    In this episode we will explore the following questions:
    What is responsible travel?What is our impact as travelers on tourist destinations?How can we get the most out of travel without wearing ourselves out?Why should we skip the bucket list and the search for "hidden gems?"How can we do better with souvenirs? How does travel connect with overconsumption? And even the fast fashion industry?And so much more...Check out Desirée's guide to Porta Portese here.
    Read Ginger's travel writing:https://www.lonelyplanet.com/authors/virginia-digaetano
    https://italicsmag.com/author/ginger/
    Be the first to hear all of the details about where, when, and how Episode 200 is happening: join the mailing list.Have a question for Amanda to answer during episode 200? Submit it here.
    Behind the Seams
    If you want to share your opinion/additional thoughts on the subjects we cover in each episode, feel free to email, whether it’s a typed out message or an audio recording:  amanda@clotheshorse.world
    Did you enjoy this episode? Consider "buying me a coffee" via Ko-fi: ko-fi.com/clotheshorse
    Find this episode's transcript (and so much more) at clotheshorsepodcast.com
    Clotheshorse is brought to you with support from the following sustainable small businesses:
    ​High Energy Vintage is a fun and funky vintage shop located in Somerville, MA, just a few minutes away from downtown Boston. They offer a highly curated selection of bright and colorful clothing and accessories from the 1940s-1990s for people of all genders. Husband-and-wife duo Wiley & Jessamy handpick each piece for quality and style, with a focus on pieces that transcend trends and will find a home in your closet for many years to come! In addition to clothing, the shop also features a large selection of vintage vinyl and old school video games. Find them on instagram @ highenergyvintage, online at highenergyvintage.com, and at markets in and around Boston.
    The Pewter Thimble Is there a little bit of Italy in your soul? Are you an enthusiast of pre-loved decor and accessories? Bring vintage Italian style — and history — into your space with The Pewter Thimble (@thepewterthimble). We source useful and beautiful things, and mend them where needed. We also find gorgeous illustrations, and make them print-worthy. Tarot cards, tea towels and handpicked treasures, available to you from the comfort of your own home. Responsibly sourced from across Rome, lovingly renewed by fairly paid artists and artisans, with something for every budget. Discover more at thepewterthimble.com
    St. Evens is an NYC-based vintage shop that is dedicated to bringing you those special pieces you’ll reach for again and again. More than just a store, St. Evens is dedicated to sharing the stories and history behind the garments. 10% of all sales are donated to a different charitable organization each month.  New vintage is released every Thursday at wearStEvens.com, with previews of new pieces and more brought to you on Instagram at @wear_st.evens.
    Deco Denim is a startup based out of San Francisco, selling clothing and accessories that are sustainable, gender fluid, size inclusive and high quality--made to last for years to come. Deco Denim is trying to change the way you think about buying clothes. Founder Sarah Mattes wants to empower people to ask important questions like, “Where was this made? Was this garment made ethically? Is this fabric made of plastic? Can this garment be upcycled and if not, can it be recycled?” Signup at decodenim.com to receive $20 off your first purchase. They promise not

    • 2 hr 32 min
    Episode 196: All About The Fashion Act, with Maxine Bédat

    Episode 196: All About The Fashion Act, with Maxine Bédat

    Amanda is joined by Maxine Bédat, author of Unraveled: The Life and Death of a Garment and the founder/director of sustainable fashion think tank New Standard Institute. In 2021, Maxine led the introduction of the New York Fashion Sustainability and Social Accountability Act...aka the Fashion Act!  In this episode we will answer all of your questions about this groundbreaking piece of legislation, including
    Why is the fashion industry largely unregulated?What are the policies within the legislation?What are the penalties for brands that don’t adhere to the guidelines?How do science based targets lead to business shifts?How would the Fashion Act impact us (people who buy and wear clothing)?How can you (yes, YOU) get involved in the Fashion Act?How is working as a community good for our mental health?What are examples of other times in history where concerned citizens have powered major social/political change?Also: Amanda talks about the importance of hope and how community creates and spreads hope.
    Learn more:Follow @nsifashion2030 to stay in the loop.Support the Fashion Act here.Join us in Albany, NY for our next lobbying day on May 7! Details coming in the following weeks.
    Be the first to hear all of the details about where, when, and how Episode 200 is happening: join the mailing list.Have a question for Amanda to answer during episode 200? Submit it here.
    The March webinar/hang out session is happening on Thursday, 3/28. Want to join us? Register here.
    Behind the Seams
    If you want to share your opinion/additional thoughts on the subjects we cover in each episode, feel free to email, whether it’s a typed out message or an audio recording:  amanda@clotheshorse.world
    Did you enjoy this episode? Consider "buying me a coffee" via Ko-fi: ko-fi.com/clotheshorse
    Find this episode's transcript (and so much more) at clotheshorsepodcast.com
    Clotheshorse is brought to you with support from the following sustainable small businesses:
    ​High Energy Vintage is a fun and funky vintage shop located in Somerville, MA, just a few minutes away from downtown Boston. They offer a highly curated selection of bright and colorful clothing and accessories from the 1940s-1990s for people of all genders. Husband-and-wife duo Wiley & Jessamy handpick each piece for quality and style, with a focus on pieces that transcend trends and will find a home in your closet for many years to come! In addition to clothing, the shop also features a large selection of vintage vinyl and old school video games. Find them on instagram @ highenergyvintage, online at highenergyvintage.com, and at markets in and around Boston.
    The Pewter Thimble Is there a little bit of Italy in your soul? Are you an enthusiast of pre-loved decor and accessories? Bring vintage Italian style — and history — into your space with The Pewter Thimble (@thepewterthimble). We source useful and beautiful things, and mend them where needed. We also find gorgeous illustrations, and make them print-worthy. Tarot cards, tea towels and handpicked treasures, available to you from the comfort of your own home. Responsibly sourced from across Rome, lovingly renewed by fairly paid artists and artisans, with something for every budget. Discover more at thepewterthimble.com
    St. Evens is an NYC-based vintage shop that is dedicated to bringing you those special pieces you’ll reach for again and again. More than just a store, St. Evens is dedicated to sharing the stories and history behind the garments. 10% of all sales are donated to a different charitable organization each month.  New vintage is released every Thursday at wearStEvens.com, with previews of new pieces and more brought to you on Instagram at @wear_st.evens.
    Deco Denim is a startup based out of San Francisco, selling clothing and accessories that are sustainable, gender fluid, size inclusive and high quality--made to last for years to come. Deco Denim is trying to change the way you think about buying clothes. Founder Sarah Ma

    • 2 hr 4 min
    Episode 195: Exploring The Future of Secondhand Resale with Jake & Yulia of Treet

    Episode 195: Exploring The Future of Secondhand Resale with Jake & Yulia of Treet

    What if we could use secondhand resale as a way to push brands toward making higher quality, longer last clothing? And what if resale could be more equitable for everyone involved?  In this episode, Amanda is joined by Jake and Yulia of Treet.  We will discuss how helping brands create their own resale platforms could benefit customers, the planet, AND the brands themselves. 
    Also, in this episode, most brands are at crossroads: try to compete with the ultra fast fashion brands like Shein and Cider, or sort of “rehabilitate” their approach to making clothing by selling stuff that lasts longer and is better quality.   Will they try to compete with Shein (and fail) or choose the more ethical, sustainable path forward? And how can resale be a part of pushing fast fashion brands in a better direction?
    Be the first to hear all of the details about where, when, and how Episode 200 is happening: join the mailing list.
    The March webinar/hang out session is happening on Thursday, 3/28. Want to join us? Register here.
    Behind the Seams
    If you want to share your opinion/additional thoughts on the subjects we cover in each episode, feel free to email, whether it’s a typed out message or an audio recording:  amanda@clotheshorse.world
    Did you enjoy this episode? Consider "buying me a coffee" via Ko-fi: ko-fi.com/clotheshorse
    Find this episode's transcript (and so much more) at clotheshorsepodcast.com
    Clotheshorse is brought to you with support from the following sustainable small businesses:
    ​High Energy Vintage is a fun and funky vintage shop located in Somerville, MA, just a few minutes away from downtown Boston. They offer a highly curated selection of bright and colorful clothing and accessories from the 1940s-1990s for people of all genders. Husband-and-wife duo Wiley & Jessamy handpick each piece for quality and style, with a focus on pieces that transcend trends and will find a home in your closet for many years to come! In addition to clothing, the shop also features a large selection of vintage vinyl and old school video games. Find them on instagram @ highenergyvintage, online at highenergyvintage.com, and at markets in and around Boston.
    The Pewter Thimble Is there a little bit of Italy in your soul? Are you an enthusiast of pre-loved decor and accessories? Bring vintage Italian style — and history — into your space with The Pewter Thimble (@thepewterthimble). We source useful and beautiful things, and mend them where needed. We also find gorgeous illustrations, and make them print-worthy. Tarot cards, tea towels and handpicked treasures, available to you from the comfort of your own home. Responsibly sourced from across Rome, lovingly renewed by fairly paid artists and artisans, with something for every budget. Discover more at thepewterthimble.com
    St. Evens is an NYC-based vintage shop that is dedicated to bringing you those special pieces you’ll reach for again and again. More than just a store, St. Evens is dedicated to sharing the stories and history behind the garments. 10% of all sales are donated to a different charitable organization each month.  New vintage is released every Thursday at wearStEvens.com, with previews of new pieces and more brought to you on Instagram at @wear_st.evens.
    Deco Denim is a startup based out of San Francisco, selling clothing and accessories that are sustainable, gender fluid, size inclusive and high quality--made to last for years to come. Deco Denim is trying to change the way you think about buying clothes. Founder Sarah Mattes wants to empower people to ask important questions like, “Where was this made? Was this garment made ethically? Is this fabric made of plastic? Can this garment be upcycled and if not, can it be recycled?” Signup at decodenim.com to receive $20 off your first purchase. They promise not to spam you and send out no more than 3 emails a month, with 2 of them surrounding education or a personal note from the Founder. Find them on Instagram as

    • 1 hr 58 min
    Episode 194: The Question-sode

    Episode 194: The Question-sode

    Amanda answers questions from members of the Clotheshorse community.Here are just a few of the things covered in this episode:
    How do we avoid overconsumption at the thrift store?How can we simultaneously take control of our finances and reduce our consumption?How do we find our personal style in a sea of "kinda garbage" clothes?Why is it so difficult to find clothing in larger sizes? And why are so few brands offering extended sizing?What changes does Amanda wish the industry had made a long time ago to be more ethical and sustainable?What is Amanda's vision for a circular fashion industry?How much worse could clothing get?How can we talk to others about slow fashion without being shame-y or annoying?And so much more!
    Also in this episode: Amanda reveals some exciting news about episode 200 (happening in April)!
    Read this: "This fabric recycling company was going to change fashion. Why did it suddenly go bankrupt?"  Adele Peters, Fast Company.
    Be the first to hear all of the details about where, when, and how Episode 200 is happening: join the mailing list.
    If you want to share your opinion/additional thoughts on the subjects we cover in each episode, feel free to email, whether it’s a typed out message or an audio recording:  amanda@clotheshorse.world
    Did you enjoy this episode? Consider "buying me a coffee" via Ko-fi: ko-fi.com/clotheshorse
    Find this episode's transcript (and so much more) at clotheshorsepodcast.com
    Clotheshorse is brought to you with support from the following sustainable small businesses:
    ​High Energy Vintage is a fun and funky vintage shop located in Somerville, MA, just a few minutes away from downtown Boston. They offer a highly curated selection of bright and colorful clothing and accessories from the 1940s-1990s for people of all genders. Husband-and-wife duo Wiley & Jessamy handpick each piece for quality and style, with a focus on pieces that transcend trends and will find a home in your closet for many years to come! In addition to clothing, the shop also features a large selection of vintage vinyl and old school video games. Find them on instagram @ highenergyvintage, online at highenergyvintage.com, and at markets in and around Boston.
    The Pewter Thimble Is there a little bit of Italy in your soul? Are you an enthusiast of pre-loved decor and accessories? Bring vintage Italian style — and history — into your space with The Pewter Thimble (@thepewterthimble). We source useful and beautiful things, and mend them where needed. We also find gorgeous illustrations, and make them print-worthy. Tarot cards, tea towels and handpicked treasures, available to you from the comfort of your own home. Responsibly sourced from across Rome, lovingly renewed by fairly paid artists and artisans, with something for every budget. Discover more at thepewterthimble.com
    St. Evens is an NYC-based vintage shop that is dedicated to bringing you those special pieces you’ll reach for again and again. More than just a store, St. Evens is dedicated to sharing the stories and history behind the garments. 10% of all sales are donated to a different charitable organization each month.  New vintage is released every Thursday at wearStEvens.com, with previews of new pieces and more brought to you on Instagram at @wear_st.evens.
    Deco Denim is a startup based out of San Francisco, selling clothing and accessories that are sustainable, gender fluid, size inclusive and high quality--made to last for years to come. Deco Denim is trying to change the way you think about buying clothes. Founder Sarah Mattes wants to empower people to ask important questions like, “Where was this made? Was this garment made ethically? Is this fabric made of plastic? Can this garment be upcycled and if not, can it be recycled?” Signup at decodenim.com to receive $20 off your first purchase. They promise not to spam you and send out no more than 3 emails a month, with 2 of them surrounding education or a personal note from the Founder.

    • 2 hr 11 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
230 Ratings

230 Ratings

ahnajennine ,

Fantastic Podcast

I worked in fast fashion retail for 12 years and saw a lot of horrible things. I have since left and started knitting/sewing my own clothes as well as trying to buy secondhand to the best of my ability. Amanda’s podcast reinforces why I do it and has opened my eyes to so much more than I could even imagine within the fast fashion industry. Amanda, I do hope you continue the podcast, you are doing so much good in the world with it!

AwesomePossum3 ,

You are amazing

Amanda, you are amazing. You are a truth teller and speak with an authority that I haven’t found in any similar podcast.

For every 99 of us who love you, 1 person might have a different opinion. And you know what? You can’t control how they feel - full stop. We can only control ourselves. Lean into the love of the 99 of us and don’t let that 1 person tell you how it is, lest you change yourself for them, to the chagrin of the other 99 of us 🙂

FashionistaBetch ,

I am here for the change

I listen intently to everything you have to say, it means so much. But you’re most recent podcast. Hit hard in a good way. The quote you made” nothing changes without people” and how we need to bring more people in to this community is so important. The one thing I really see on social media is the lack of connection. The way brands want to achieve fame, but not invite people in,that really want to help make that change. We should all be following each other, talking., connecting, even outside of social media. That is the one thing that’s been very hard for me on social media.; is trying so hard to speak up and have a voice and connect, and it being met with silence. I would love to see how we could change that!

I thank you for your podcast. It has really made a difference to me in a very impactful and positive way.

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