1,301 episodes

The hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. New episodes six days a week, Sunday through Friday.Support NPR and get your news sponsor-free with Consider This+. Learn more at plus.npr.org/considerthis

Consider This from NPR Consider This

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The hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. New episodes six days a week, Sunday through Friday.Support NPR and get your news sponsor-free with Consider This+. Learn more at plus.npr.org/considerthis

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    Could the U.K. election mean an off-ramp from personality politics?

    Could the U.K. election mean an off-ramp from personality politics?

    As the U.K. gears up for a July election, polls show the liberal Labour Party ahead of Prime Minister Rishi Sunak's Conservatives by a hefty margin.

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    • 10 min
    When it comes to the Israel-Gaza war, the split in opinion is generational

    When it comes to the Israel-Gaza war, the split in opinion is generational

    After the October 7 attack by Hamas on Israel that killed more than 1,100 people, President Joe Biden expressed America's backing for its Middle Eastern ally.

    But that same month, polls showed that support for Israel among American voters was not unwavering. And that, in fact, support was split across generations.

    That split between young voters poured out into the streets in November. Two big marches – one organized by pro-Palestinian groups and one by pro-Israeli groups – occurred in Washington.

    Whether or not Joe Biden gets re-elected in 2024 will depend a lot on if he can repeat his 2020 success with young voters. But a split over U.S. support for Israel may get in his way.

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    • 9 min
    What a second Biden or Trump presidency could mean for American allies and foes

    What a second Biden or Trump presidency could mean for American allies and foes

    America is facing two very different futures on the world stage after November.

    If former President Trump wins, he's promised to fundamentally re-evaluate the NATO alliance, reshape global trade and overhaul the Pentagon, State Department and intelligence agencies.

    He's largely avoided explaining how he'd handle the conflicts in Europe and the Middle East, yet says he can settle the war in Ukraine in 24 hours.

    Meanwhile, if President Biden wins, he's signaled his commitment to fight global threats to peace and freedom, and he's vowed to continue to help Ukraine and Israel fight in their respective wars.

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    • 15 min
    Does artificial intelligence deliver immortality?

    Does artificial intelligence deliver immortality?

    Michael Bommer likely only has a few weeks left to live. A couple years ago, he was diagnosed with terminal colon cancer.

    Then, an opportunity arose to build an interactive artificial intelligence version of himself through a friend's company, Eternos.Life, so his wife, Anett, can interact with him after he dies.

    More and more people are turning to artificial intelligence to create digital memorials of themselves.

    Meanwhile Katarzyna Nowaczyk-Basińska, a research associate at the University of Cambridge, has been studying the field of "digital death" for nearly a decade, and says using artificial intelligence after death is one big "techno-cultural experiment" because we don't yet know how people will respond to it.

    Artificial intelligence has opened the door for us to "live on" after we die. Just because we can, should we?

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    • 13 min
    Can the U.S. force a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas?

    Can the U.S. force a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas?

    On Saturday, Israeli special forces rescued four hostages held by Hamas in Gaza, killing at least 270 Palestinians and injuring hundreds in the process.

    The rescue of the hostages was a moment of triumph for the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, but he didn't have long to bask in it.

    Benny Gantz, a centrist member of Israel's unity war cabinet, announced his resignation on Sunday, over Netanyahu's management of the war in Gaza. After Gantz's resignation, Netanyahu will be even more reliant on far-right members of his coalition, who have vocally opposed efforts to broker a cease-fire.

    The U.S. continues to push a cease-fire proposal outlined last month, and on Monday the U.N. Security council passed a U.S.-drafted resolution supporting that deal.

    NPR's Michele Kelemen and Daniel Estrin help us get a sense of what this weekend's events might mean for the war and its ending.

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    • 10 min
    COVID funding is ending for schools. What will it mean for students?

    COVID funding is ending for schools. What will it mean for students?

    Billions of dollars in federal COVID funding is set to expire for K-12 schools.

    Educators across the country say the extra money helped students catch up, and plenty of students still need that support.

    Some schools say losing the the money, received over the last few years, will lead to cancelation of crucial programs, budget cutbacks and possible layoffs.

    NPR's Scott Detrow speaks with Wall Street Journal education reporter Matt Barnum about the impact of expiring federal funds on schools across the country.

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    • 9 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
5.1K Ratings

5.1K Ratings

soulrockerTLee ,

Trump DOESNT pay HIS bills!!!

So, how can he talk about NATO countries?!?!

midwestBlue ,

6.1.24

today on all things considered i couldn’t believe carrie johnson said trump had an alleged affair with stormy daniels. carrie, it is not alleged, it was part of the trial that it did happen and trump never testified under oath to deny it.

Samawhaaat ,

Lazy journalism

I have been a lifelong liberal and strong supporter of NPR (including financially). I know you are trying to break down complex topics into bite size pieces, but it just feels LAZY. Opinion contributors to complex topics, sharing only one side that is an opinion without supporting facts. The Outside Agitators episode being the latest one. Do better.

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