13 episodes

Do you know how your wife views romance? How about how your husband does? We dive into the deep end on Romance in this podcast Creating a More Romantic Marriage.

Creating a More Romantic Marriage Dennis and Barbara Rainey

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Do you know how your wife views romance? How about how your husband does? We dive into the deep end on Romance in this podcast Creating a More Romantic Marriage.

    Why Romance is Important

    Why Romance is Important

    FamilyLife Today® Radio Transcript  
    References to conferences, resources, or other special promotions may be obsolete.
     
    Creating A More Romantic Marriage
    Day 1 of 8
    Guest:                       Dennis Rainey
    From the series:       Why Romance is Important 

    _______________________________________________________________
     
    (Nat King Cole singing "L-O-V-E")
     
    Bob:                Believe it or not, this is FamilyLife Today.  Our host is best-selling author and conference speaker, Dennis Rainey.  I'm Bob Lepine.  Stay with us as we talk about L-O-V-E today on FamilyLife Today.
     
                            And welcome to FamilyLife Today.  Thanks for joining us on the broadcast.
     
    Dennis:          Do you think our listeners know who Nat King Cole is, Bob?
     
    Bob:                Oh, yeah, everybody knows who Nat King Cole is.  I bought a two-record collection when I was in college, just because I thought, "He's got the smoothest voice, it's the most romantic music I've ever heard."
     
    Dennis:          Well, you know, we also have a lot of romantic adventures at our FamilyLife Marriage Conference, and I've got a letter here from a conferee couple who attended the Phoenix FamilyLife Marriage Conference – I think this was back in 1991.  This is a classic, keeper letter from the archives of the thousands of attendees who have been to our conference.
     
    Bob:                Now, this is on hotel stationery, right?
     
    Dennis:          That's right – the Hyatt Regency Scottsdale.  "Dear Dennis, when you suggested last night for us to be more creative in our romance, you never gave us the warning that it could be dangerous."  Then in all capital letters, it reads, "RULE NUMBER 1 – ALWAYS BE PREPARED!  AT LEAST WITH A SPARE KEY" – and now the rest of the story.
     
                            "After dinner and the sunset, we decided to take your advice and to add a little romance and be a little daring.  Staying here at the hotel, we crept out onto our fourth-floor balcony for an incredibly romantic view, not to mention some privacy.  Unbeknown to us, while we were 'communicating' and 'learning more about each other,' the maid was inside our bedroom, turning down our bedsheets for us.  She did not know we were on the balcony.  We did not know she was in the room.  Maybe you can guess the rest.  She locked the sliding glass door."  It is signed, "Two lovers, romantic sky, and lots of privacy.  Embarrassed from California."
     
    Bob:                So you have no idea how they ever got back in, huh?
     
    Dennis:          Your mind is only left to wonder – how did they get back in, there on the fourth floor of the hotel?
     
    Bob:                Well, that is a part of what we hope will be a romantic evening for couples at the FamilyLife Marriage Conference, but we hope that's not the end of romantic evenings for couples.
     
    Dennis:          Well, we really talk about FamilyLife Marriage Conference, taking Saturday and making it an adventure.  That's not the kind of adventure we're talking about.  We are talking about adding romance to your relationship, and I think at our conferences across the United States, that's what a lot of couples really seen infused back into their marriage relationship through all the teachings of scripture that build intimacy in their marriage relationship, they better understand how to relate to each other as husband and wife, and what I wanted to do, Bob, was I wanted to take the next few days, prior to Valentine's Day, and I wanted us to talk about the all-important subject of romance.
     
    Bob:                Now, you call it an all-important subject.  You kind of get the feel that romance is something that's a part of the courtship process.  After marriage, romance just doesn't seem like it has the same, you know – 
     
    Dennis:          – sizzle.
     
    Bob:       

    • 25 min
    The Romance Robbers - Foxes in the Vineyard (Part One)

    The Romance Robbers - Foxes in the Vineyard (Part One)

    Transcript not available for this episode.

    • 25 min
    The Romance Robbers - Foxes in the Vineyard (Part Two)

    The Romance Robbers - Foxes in the Vineyard (Part Two)

    Transcript not available for this episode.

    • 25 min
    A Woman's View of Romance (Part One)

    A Woman's View of Romance (Part One)

    FamilyLife Today® Radio Transcript
    References to conferences, resources, or other special promotions may be obsolete.
     
    Creating A More Romantic Marriage 
    Day 2 of 8
     
    Guest:                             Barbara Rainey
     
    From the Series:          Woman's View of Romance
    ________________________________________________________________
    ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­
    Bob:                This is FamilyLife Today.  Your host is the executive director of FamilyLife, Dennis Rainey.  I'm Bob Lepine, and today we'll learn from Barbara Rainey just how a woman does view romance on FamilyLife Today.
     
    (Music:  "How To Handle A Woman")
     
                            And welcome to FamilyLife Today.  Thanks for joining us on the broadcast.
     
    Dennis:          You know, Bob, because of who we have in the studio today, I've decided I'm just going to kind of push back from the microphone and get my notepad out and take notes.
     
    Bob:                Is that right?
     
    Dennis:          That's right.  I really feel, in due respect for my wife, she's an authority on the subject she's about to speak on and, in fact, you know what I'd like to do?  You can ask the questions – because of the nature of what we're going to talk about, it's pretty delicate, and for me to ask my wife these questions, I mean, this could get a little interesting.  So –
     
    Bob:                – well, I'm lookin' forward to this and, Barbara, by the way, welcome back to the broadcast.  It's great to have you on the program.
     
    Barbara:         You're welcome, it's good to be here.
     
    Bob:                And, Dennis, I'm going to get right to it, because we're going to be talking over the next couple of days about how a wife views romance, and I think the thing that husbands want to know, the thing that kind of puzzles us in this whole deal is what is it that we can do that causes our wives to go, "Ahhhh."  You know, just kind of look at us and melt.  I mean, does that happen with a woman?
     
    Barbara:         Well, I think it does, but I don't think it's necessarily a particular situation, because the things that are romantic to me aren't necessarily a situation or an act or a thing or a gift – all of those things communicate romance – but the particular situation isn't necessarily going to produce what you're talkin' about, which is what we've talked about a lot.
     
                            You know what I think it is, I think it is the relationship that she has with her husband, and I have been reminded again, as I've been interacting with my family, and I have seen where I have come from and how desperately dysfunctional it was, and I'm thinking, "I am married to a man who has absolutely been a savior to me because of the love and acceptance and all that kind of stuff, and I have been attracted to him because I’m realizing what he's done for me relationally.  So it's not like he thought, "I want to romance my wife, so I'm going to go buy her flowers, and so A+B=C, and this is the reaction and the response I'm going to get," although I think that's very romantic, and I love it when he does those kinds of things, because that communicates sacrifice, it communicates he cares about me, he's willing to go out of his way, he's willing to spend money that, you know, we may or may not have in the budget for that – those are all things that are very meaningful, but it may not necessarily produce the desired response.  In other words, if he's doing it to produce the response, he is very often going to be disappointed.
     
                            That's why I go back to the relationship – to me, it's the relationship that is ultimately going to fuel the romance.  And so when you ask what I thought of, my thought was – was the day that we spent together in September, and he took a whole day off work just to spend it wi

    • 25 min
    A Woman's View of Romance (Part Two)

    A Woman's View of Romance (Part Two)

    FamilyLife Today® Radio Transcript
    References to conferences, resources, or other special promotions may be obsolete.
     
    Creating A More Romantic Marriage 
    Day 3 off 8
     
    Guest:                             Barbara Rainey
     
    From the Series:          A Woman's View of Romance
    ________________________________________________________________
    ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­
    Bob:                This is FamilyLife Today with your host, the executive director of FamilyLife, Dennis Rainey.  I'm Bob Lepine.  Today on the broadcast Barbara Rainey joins us to talk about what happens when a man loves a woman.  Stay with us for FamilyLife Today.
     
    (Music:  "When A Man Loves A Woman")
     
                            And welcome to FamilyLife Today.  Thanks for joining us on the broadcast, and if you were not here with us yesterday, you're in big trouble is what you are – if you're a man, particularly.
     
    Dennis:          That's right.
     
    Bob:                I took notes on yesterday's broadcast, and I've got my pencil ready today, because we're learning how a woman views romance. 
     
    Dennis:          We're learning how a woman thinks.
     
    Bob:                That's right.  And women think differently – that's not wrong – they think differently than men, don't they?
     
    Dennis:          They do, and, well, we've got someone in the studio who is definitely a woman.  She is a great woman, she is my wife, and it's really fun to have Barbara back with us on the broadcast again today. 
     
    Bob:                Yeah, Barbara, welcome back to the broadcast.
     
    Barbara:         Thanks, glad to be here.
     
    Bob:                You know, yesterday – and I've been thinkin' about this all night.  I went home and just kinda mulled on this.  It's a little frustrating to know that once I have an idea of how my wife views romance, she's going to change the rules on me – that was one of the lessons from yesterday's broadcast ­– and to be aware that romance is going to get progressively harder as we continue in marriage.  It was easy in courtship, but it gets progressively harder as we're married.  Is that right?
     
    Dennis:          Absolutely.  
     
    Bob:                Well, that's lousy.
     
    Dennis:          Well, you think about – what's God up to here?  He is trying to rid us of selfishness and, if we could, we would kick it in neutral and just coast all the way in to year 50 of the marriage – we wouldn't have to work at it.  It would just be like jumpin' off the edge of a cliff.  We would romantically fall into each other's arms and hopelessly under the control of romance, like gravity, and not have to really work at knowing and loving and caring for and meeting the needs of the other person.  And I think that's why God created marriage – He created it to be redemptive.  He wants me to give up my life for my wife.
     
    Barbara:         Exactly.
     
    Dennis:          And that's why romance becomes really elusive in a marriage where a man is threatening to leave or a man is sending all kinds of signals that he's not committed, and he's putting fear in the marriage, not casting it out.  1 John, chapter 4, talks about "perfect love casting out all fear," and that's a man's assignment, and a lot of men want their wives to fall in a puddle at their feet and romantic love in a swoon, but they're not willing to give up their hobbies, their interests, their selfish desires for their wives.  Now, how do I know that?  Because I'm a man, and because I've done that.
     
    Barbara:         See, when I was thinkin', when you talked about it being redemptive, I was thinking that as you were saying that, and that, ultimately, is what is going to draw a wife to her husband, because when she sees him loving her unconditionally, seeking to understand her and know her and be involved in her life

    • 25 min
    A Woman's View of Romance (Part Three)

    A Woman's View of Romance (Part Three)

    FamilyLife Today® Radio Transcript
    References to conferences, resources, or other special promotions may be obsolete.
     
    Creating A More Romantic Marriage 
    Day 4 of 8
     
    Guest:                         Barbara Rainey
     
    From the Series:         A Woman's View of Romance
    _____________________________________________________________
     
    Bob:                Welcome to FamilyLife Today.  Today we're speaking frankly about how a woman views romance.
     
    (Music:  "Love and Marriage")
     
                            And welcome to FamilyLife Today.  Thanks for joining us on the broadcast.  We are beginning Week Number 2 of our look at Creating a More Romantic Marriage, and I just want to encourage folks, if you missed any of last week's programs, or if you're going to miss any of this week's programs, this is a series that husbands and wives ought to get and listen to together, and then they can talk, they can interact, about what they hear on the tapes.
     
    Dennis:          You know, this subject of developing and cultivating romance in a marriage relationship is a discussion that is long overdue among Christian couples, because we ought to have among the most passionate relationships on the planet.  Our God created romance in the first place.
     
    Bob:                Well, we're going to talk on today's broadcast about how men and women view romance, and we've brought your wife, Barbara, back in the studio with us today.  Barbara, welcome back to FamilyLife Today.
     
    Barbara:         Thanks, good to be here.
     
    Bob:                And one of the things that we want to do is look at research.  
     
    Dennis:          Right.
     
    Bob:                You commissioned that be done at our FamilyLife Marriage Conferences across the country – we had a researcher who talked with women about how they view romance, how they view it primarily, is that right?
     
    Dennis:          Actually, this Top 10 list of romantic acts came from both men and women.
     
    Bob:                Well, let me go over the list, Barbara.  I'm going to go from 10 to 1, and I'll read what people indicated expressed romance, and then I want to know, as a man, and I want to know how I can keep these ideas in front of me and sprinkle them into a relationship as a way to express romance – again, with no hidden agenda, no – not driving for anything.  Number 10, hands are romantic; holding hands, particularly, is romantic for a woman.  Do you like holding hands with Dennis?
     
    Barbara:         Mm-hm.
     
    Bob:                Why is that romantic for you?
     
    Barbara:         I do it because it says, "I want to be close to you, and I like you, and you're my friend, and I want to be next to you."  I mean, those are the kinds of things that communicates to me, and that's the reason that I initiate it, and I think that's probably the same for him, too.  So I think it's the closeness that it communicates.
     
    Bob:                Okay, how about Number 9, which is massaging one another – rubbing the neck.  Do you like when Dennis reaches over and rubs the back of your neck?  Dennis, massage oftentimes will have a sexual connotation, and some women may pull back from liking massage because they think it's just foreplay.
     
    Dennis:          Right.
     
    Barbara:         Exactly.  I think that's right.
     
    Bob:                So if it's non-sexual massage where it's just – "Let me rub your back, and you can fall asleep," then that's okay?
     
    Barbara:         Oh, I think so, yeah.
     
    Bob:                Number 8 on the list is serving – serving the other person – common courtesies – opening the door, holding a chair out for somebody, doing little acts of sacrifice.  Is that romantic for a woman?
     
    Barbara:         To me, I don't think of that as being as romantic, if I had to define them, as, say, holding hands but, again,

    • 25 min

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