17 episodes

Monthly podcast series produced by the Bennett Institute for Public Policy (Cambridge) and Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST) to give interdisciplinary answers to today's challenging questions. Hosted by Rory Cellan-Jones with guest experts from both research centres. Subscribe to the Crossing Channels podcast feed https://feeds.buzzsprout.com/1841488.rss & download each episode at the start of the month.

Crossing Channels Bennett Institute for Public Policy and IAST

    • Government
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Monthly podcast series produced by the Bennett Institute for Public Policy (Cambridge) and Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST) to give interdisciplinary answers to today's challenging questions. Hosted by Rory Cellan-Jones with guest experts from both research centres. Subscribe to the Crossing Channels podcast feed https://feeds.buzzsprout.com/1841488.rss & download each episode at the start of the month.

    Is technology changing our behaviour?

    Is technology changing our behaviour?

    Rory Cellan-Jones and leading experts Maria Kleshnina, Daniel Nettle and Amy Orben discuss the drivers of cooperation and how online and offline environments are impacting human behaviour. 
    This podcast unpacks the facilitators and inhibitors of cooperative behaviours to tackle wicked problems and the impact of our environment on cooperation. Our guests from the University of Cambridge, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse, and École Normale Supérieure-PSL, explore how megatrends, such as digitalisation and inequality, impact cooperation and the policy levers needed to achieve positive societal change. 


    This episode is hosted by Rory Cellan-Jones (former technology correspondent for the BBC), and features Maria Kleshnina (IAST), Daniel Nettle (L'École normale supérieure - PSL) and Amy Orben (University of Cambridge). 


    Listen to this episode on your preferred podcast platform


    Season 2 Episode 6 transcript


    For more information about the podcast and the work of the institutes, visit our websites at https://www.bennettinstitute.cam.ac.uk/ and https://www.iast.fr/


    Tweet us with your thoughts at @BennettInst and @IASToulouse.


    Audio production by Steve Hankey
    Associate production by Stella Erker
    Visuals by Thomas Devaud


    More information about our guests:


    Dr Maria Kleshnina is a postdoctoral research fellow at the IAST. Her research focuses on behavioural aspects in evolutionary game theory. She is interested in the evolution of behavioural strategies and learning, especially, in the presence of inequality. Before joining IAST, she was a member of the research group of Krishnendu Chatterjee at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria and a visiting researcher in the Behavioral Economics group at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Vienna. 


    Professor Daniel Nettle is a researcher in the Evolution and Social Cognition team at the École Normale Supérieure-PSL, Professor of Behavioural Science at Newcastle University and  a member of the scientific committee at the IAST. His research focuses on a number of different topics relating to behaviour, cognition, society and health.


    Dr Amy Orben is a Programme Leader Track Scientist at the MRC (Medical Research Council) Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, University of Cambridge and a Research Fellow at Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge. She leads the Digital Mental Health programme at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit. Amy’s research uses large-scale data to examine how digital technologies affect adolescent psychological wellbeing and mental health. @OrbenAmy

    • 30 min
    Why are stories important for society?

    Why are stories important for society?

    Rory Cellan-Jones and leading experts Sarah Dillon and Manvir Singh discuss the value of stories, the possible dangers of endorsing stories and the need for narrative evidence to inform decision-making. 
    This episode unpacks the value of stories to understand the past and inform current policy debates. Leading experts from the University of Cambridge and the Institute for Advanced Studies in Toulouse discuss the origin of stories, the status of storytellers, and the crucial need to listen to stories to improve policymaking. 


    This episode is hosted by Rory Cellan-Jones (former technology correspondent for the BBC) and features guest experts Sarah Dillon (University of Cambridge) and Manvir Singh (Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse). 


    Listen to this episode on your preferred podcast platform


    Episode 5 Transcript


    For more information about the podcast and the work of the institutes, visit our websites at bennettinstitute.cam.ac.uk and iast.fr


    Tweet us with your thoughts at @BennettInst and @IASToulouse


    Audio production by Steve Hankey
    Associate production by Stella Erker
    Visuals by Thomas Devaud


    About our guests
    Sarah Dillon is Professor of Literature and the Public Humanities in the Faculty of English at the University of Cambridge. She is a scholar of contemporary literature, film and philosophy, with a research focus on the epistemic function and value of stories, on interdisciplinarity, and on the engaged humanities. She is the co-author of “Storylistening: Narrative Evidence and Public Reasoning”. Sarah is also a member of the Bennett Institute Management Board. @profsarahdillon


    Manvir Singh is a cognitive and evolutionary anthropologist at the Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse. His research asks why human societies everywhere give rise to practices and beliefs with striking similarities, with a focus on behaviours such as music, story, shamanism, and punitive justice. His toolkit combines ethnographic research, psychological experiments, and the analysis of cross-cultural databases. He received a PhD from the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University in 2020. @mnvrsngh


    Rory Cellan-Jones is a former technology correspondent for the BBC. His 40 years in journalism saw him take a particular interest in the impact of the internet and digital technology on society and business. He has written multiple books, including his latest “Always On” which was published in 2021. @ruskin147

    • 31 min
    Ukraine war - how can academics apply their expertise?

    Ukraine war - how can academics apply their expertise?

    Tymofiy Mylovanov, president of the Kyiv School of Economics (KSE), and Nataliia Shapoval, head of KSE Institute, discuss how their research priorities have shifted during the war on Ukraine, how the University has operated throughout these challenging times, and why the higher education system is integral to Ukraine’s future. 
    This episode is hosted by Rory Cellan-Jones (former technology correspondent for the BBC), and features guest experts Tymofiy Mylovanov (Kyiv School of Economics) and Nataliia Shapoval (Kyiv School of Economics). 


    Listen to this episode on your preferred podcast platform: https://pod.fo/e/15661f


    Season 2 Episode 4 transcript: https://www.bennettinstitute.cam.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2022/12/CC-S2-ep4-transcript.pdf

    Relevant links
    Listen to our first episode on Ukraine with Nataliia Shapoval here: Ukraine Invasion: context, consequences and the information war.

    Keep up to date on events in Ukraine by following the Kyiv School of Economics @kse_ua, the Kyiv Institute @KSE_Institute, Tymofiy Mylovanov’s daily morning and evening updates @Mylovanov and Nataliia Shapoval @Nataliia_Shapo.

    The Kyiv School of Economics, together with Ukrainian businesses and state-owned companies, have launched a humanitarian aid campaign for Ukraine. You can also help (link to KSE website). 
    Tweet us with your thoughts at @BennettInst and @IASToulouse
    Audio production by Steve Hankey.
    Associate production by Stella Erker. 
    Visuals by Thomas Devaud. 

    More information about our guests:


    Tymofiy Mylovanov is the President of Kyiv School of Economics, Associate Professor at the University of Pittsburgh and former Minister of Economic Development, Trade and Agriculture of Ukraine. He received his M.A. in Economics from KSE and earned his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Wisconsin Madison. Tymofiy’s research interests cover such areas as theory of games and contracts, and institutional design. His articles on these topics have been published in the leading international academic magazines, including Econometrica, American Economic Review, the Review of Economic Studies. @Mylovanov @kse_ua


    Nataliia Shapoval is the Vice President for Policy Research and Director of the Center of Excellence in Procurement at the Kyiv School of Economics in Ukraine. She worked on policy research projects on public health’s cost and resource allocation, and on youth unemployment in Ukraine and Europe. She is also a member of the Editorial Board of Vox Ukraine, and a contributor to the Ukraine reform monitoring project of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. @Nataliia_Shapo @KSE_Institute


    Rory Cellan-Jones is a former technology correspondent for the BBC. His 40 years in journalism saw him take a particular interest in the impact of the internet and digital technology on society and business. He has written multiple books, including his latest “Always On” wh

    • 36 min
    How much do people care about inequality?

    How much do people care about inequality?

    Rory Cellan-Jones and leading experts Charlotte Cavaillé, Ailbhe McNabola and Jack Shaw discuss the causes of income and regional inequality, why policymakers should care, and what policy interventions work best to reduce them.

    Guests discuss recent trends in income and regional inequality, and evaluate the effectiveness of different policy approaches. They debate the opportunities and challenges of (de)centralisation, what works best to revive ‘left behind’ places, and whether the assumptions built into the Levelling Up White Paper will deliver to reduce inequalities. 
    This episode is hosted by Rory Cellan-Jones (former technology correspondent for the BBC), and features guest experts Professor Charlotte Cavaillé (Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan and IAST), Ailbhe McNabola (Bennett Institute for Public Policy and Power to Change) and Jack Shaw (Bennett Institute for Public Policy). 
    Season 2 Episode 3 transcript
    For more information about the podcast and the work of the institutes, visit our websites at https://www.bennettinstitute.cam.ac.uk/ and https://www.iast.fr/.
    Tweet us with your thoughts at @BennettInst and @IASToulouse.
    Audio production by Steve Hankey.
    Associate production by Stella Erker. 
    Visuals by Thomas Devaud. 
    Relevant links and publications
    Shaw, J., Garling, O. and Kenny, M. (2022). Townscapes: Pride in Place. The Bennett Institute, https://www.bennettinstitute.cam.ac.uk/publications/pride-in-place/ Charlotte Cavaillé (forthcoming). Fair Enough? Support for Redistribution in the Age of Inequality, https://charlottecavaille.wordpress.com/book-project/ More information about our guests:
    Professor Charlotte Cavaillé is a visiting Research Fellow at the IAST and an Assistant Professor at the Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan. Her research examines the dynamics of popular attitudes towards redistributive social policies at a time of rising inequality, high fiscal stress and high levels of immigration. In her forthcoming book, Fair Enough? Support for Redistribution in the Age of Inequality, Charlotte proposes a new framework to explain why, in countries where inequality has increased the most, voters are not asking for more income redistribution.
    Ailbhe McNabola is an Affiliated Researcher at the Bennett Institute for Public Policy and Director of Policy and Communications at Power to Change, a charitable trust that supports communities to run businesses that reinvest profits into their local area. She is also Co-Chair of the Social Research Association, a membership organisation that promotes excellence in social research, and a CAPE Policy Fellow. Her career has encompassed management consultancy in the financial services and public sectors, and the commissioning and production of research, evaluation and policy analysis reports for a range of UK government bodies.
    Jack Shaw is an Affiliated Researcher at the Bennett Institute for Public Policy and recently co-authored a report on pride in place with Professor Michael Kenny and Owen Garling, also at the Bennett Institute. His background is in local government and economic development and currently works at the Institute for Public Policy and Research.
    Rory Cellan-Jones is a former technology correspondent for the BBC. His 40 years in journalism saw him take a particular interest in the impact of the internet and digital technology on society and business

    • 29 min
    Wellbeing at work - whose job is it to fix it?

    Wellbeing at work - whose job is it to fix it?

    Rory Cellan-Jones and leading experts Gordon Harold, Laura Nurski and Zoe Purcell discuss why mental wellbeing in the workplace is essential, and what policymakers can do to promote a healthy workforce. 
    This episode unpacks the impact of the future of work on mental wellbeing, and its implications for policy. Leading experts discuss the major trends shaping the future of work, how job quality and AI (artificial intelligence) impact wellbeing, and whether it is the job of businesses or governments to promote positive mental health in the workplace. 
    This episode is hosted by Rory Cellan-Jones (former technology correspondent for the BBC), and features guest experts Professor Gordon Harold (University of Cambridge), Dr Laura Nurski (Bruegel) and Dr Zoe Purcell (Institute For Advanced Study in Toulouse). 


    Season 2, Episode 2 transcript


    For more information about the podcast and the work of the institutes, visit our websites at https://www.bennettinstitute.cam.ac.uk/ and https://www.iast.fr/
    Tweet us with your thoughts at @BennettInst and @IASToulouse


    Audio production by Steve Hankey.
    Podcast production by Stella Erker. 


    More information about our guests:
    Professor Gordon Harold is the inaugural Professor of the Psychology of Education and Mental Health at the University of Cambridge. His primary research interests focus on (1) examining the role of family relationship dynamics as a factor underlying differences in child and adolescent mental health outcomes and future life chances, (2) understanding the interplay between genetic factors and family relationship factors and young people's mental health and development, and (3) promoting the implementation and evaluation of evidence-based practice and policy guidelines aimed at enhancing mental health outcomes for young people. 


    Dr Zoe Purcell is a cognitive psychologist interested in reasoning and decision-making. Her research focuses on the factors — in particular, expertise, confidence, and uncertainty — involved in the transition between intuitive and effortful thinking. Alongside this theoretical work, she investigates applied and contemporary questions such as: “How do we reason with and about AI?” and “What are the psychological drivers of innovation?”. Currently, Zoe is working as a post-doc at the University of Toulouse with the Artificial and Natural Intelligence Institute of Toulouse (ANITI) and the Institute of Advanced Studies Toulouse (IAST).


    Dr Laura Nurski holds a PhD in Industrial Organization, an M.Sc. in Economics and an M.A. in Business Engineering from KU Leuven. Currently, she leads the Future of Work and Inclusive Growth project at the European think tank Bruegel. The project analyses the impact of technology on the nature, quantity and quality of work, welfare systems and inclusive growth. Laura is passionate about data and technology. As a former data scientist in the financial and retail sector, she developed machine learning models and big data analytics.

    Rory Cellan-Jones is a former technology correspondent for the BBC. His 40 years in journalism saw him take a particular interest in the impact of the internet and digital technology on society and business. He has written multiple books, including his latest “Always On” which was published in 2021.

    • 31 min
    Has digital technology made us better off?

    Has digital technology made us better off?

    Rory Cellan-Jones talks to leading economists Diane Coyle, Jacques Crémer and Jean Tirole, about why productivity growth has slowed in spite of immense technological progress and what policy can do about it.

    This episode unravels the impact of digitalisation on economic growth and its implications for policy. Leading economists discuss the productivity puzzle, why regulating Big Tech is so difficult, the threats of mass surveillance, and what policymakers can do to address these challenges. 
    This episode is hosted by Rory Cellan-Jones (former technology correspondent for the BBC), and features guest experts Professor Diane Coyle (Bennett Institute for Public Policy), Professor Jacques Crémer (Toulouse School of Economics) and Professor Jean Tirole (Toulouse School of Economics – International Advanced Study in Toulouse). 
    Listen to this episode on your preferred podcast platform: https://pod.fo/e/14406b
    Season 2 Episode 1 transcript: https://www.bennettinstitute.cam.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/CC-S2-EP1-transcript.pdf 


    For more information about the podcast and the work of the institutes, visit our websites at https://www.bennettinstitute.cam.ac.uk/ and https://www.iast.fr/.
    Tweet us with your thoughts at @BennettInst and @IASToulouse


    With thanks to:
    Audio production by Steve Hankey.
    Podcast editing by Stella Erker. 


    More information about our guests:
    Professor Diane Coyle is the Bennett Professor of Public Policy at the University of Cambridge. She co-directs the Bennett Institute where she heads the themes of progress and productivity, and researches the digital economy and economic measurement. Diane is also a Director of the Productivity Institute, and a Fellow of the Office for National Statistics. 


    Professor Jacques Crémer received his undergraduate degree from the Ecole Polytechnique in 1971, a SM in Management and a PhD in economics, both from MIT, in 1973 and 1977. He has held appointments at the University of Pennsylvania and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. His current research interests are the economics of organization, the economics of the Internet and of the software industries, as well as contract theory.


    Professor Jean Tirole is honorary chairman of the Foundation JJ Laffont-Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), and scientific director of TSE-Partnership. He is also affiliated with MIT, where he holds a visiting position, and the Institut de France. Professor Tirole’s research covers industrial organization, regulation, finance, macroeconomics and banking, and psychology-based economics. 


    Rory Cellan-Jones is a former technology correspondent for the BBC. His 40 years in journalism saw him take a particular interest in the impact of the internet and digital technology on society and business. He has written multiple books, including his latest “Always On” which was published in 2021.

    • 30 min

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