722 episodes

Weekly episodes digging up lost and forgotten 90s rock — in-depth album reviews, roundtable discussions, and artist interviews that reveal the unique story of the 90s.

Dig Me Out: 90s Rock Dig Me Out

    • Music
    • 4.4 • 127 Ratings

Weekly episodes digging up lost and forgotten 90s rock — in-depth album reviews, roundtable discussions, and artist interviews that reveal the unique story of the 90s.

    INXS - Full Moon, Dirty Hearts | 90s Album Review

    INXS - Full Moon, Dirty Hearts | 90s Album Review

    In 1992, INXS released Welcome to Wherever You Are and instead of touring, headed back into the studio for a quick follow-up. 1993's Full Moon, Dirty Hearts was the result, a mixed bag of innovation incorporating bass grooves on tracks like "The Gift" and "Cut Your Roses Down" while still writing anthemic choruses on tracks like "Days of Rust" and "Time." In the midst of the grunge takeover of America, it's not surprising the album didn't fare well with radio or the charts. While guest vocalists Ray Charles and Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders are welcome, their inclusion didn't push the needle. Revisiting the album, it's an interesting crossroads of what the band was and the sounds of the decade to come, with electronic elements sneaking in that wouldn't sound out of place later in the decade.
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - The Gift
    21:17 - Time
    25:13 - Cut Your Roses Down
    32:16 - Kill The Pain
    41:12 - Please (You Got That...)
    Outro - Days of Rust
     
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    • 1 hr 3 min
    Monique Powell of Save Ferris | 90s Artist Interview

    Monique Powell of Save Ferris | 90s Artist Interview

    All the way back in season seven, we reviewed Save Ferris’s 1997 release It Means Everything, the first ska album discussed on a deep dive for the podcast. Seven years later, we catch up with Save Ferris lead singer Monique Powell who discusses how she joined the ska-punk band, the highs and lows of signing to a major label, what it was like being on the road with artists like Sugar Ray and The Offspring in the late ‘90s and the current status of the band. During the interview, we briefly discussed the legal fight Powell was engaged in with former members which led to Powell taking ownership of the group and retroactively being given co-songwriting credits for songs that appeared on It Means Everything and 1999’s Modified. To read more about the case, read the 2019 Forbes magazine feature.
     
    Songs in this Episode:
    Intro - The World Is New
    30:47 - Come On Eileen
    Outro - The World Is New
     
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    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.
     

    • 45 min
    Supergrass - In It for the Money | 90s Album Review

    Supergrass - In It for the Money | 90s Album Review

    Rock music genres often get reduced to a "Big Four." For Grunge, it was Alice In Chains, Nirvana, Pearl Jam, and Soundgarden. For Thrash, Anthrax, Megadeth, Metallica, and Slayer made the grade. In 90s Britpop, Oasis, Blur, Pulp and Suede got the nod. But as if often the case, the bands on the cusp are often as interesting or even more-so thanks to being just outside the spotlight. In the case of Supergrass, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones creep in as influences like their Britpop contemporaries, but the energetic attitude and willingness to embrace the chaos of The Who's rhythm section and the concise songwriting perfection of The Kinks helps their second album, 1997's In It for the Money, exceed not just their debut, but most of the Britpop catalog. Looking at the charts, it's not hard to see why killer singles like "Richard III," "Cheapskate," "Sun Hits The Sky" and "Late in the Day" failed to impact American radio and pop culture consciousness. While Blur had "woo-hoos" and Third Eye Blind had "do do do's," Supergrass ditched guitar solos for theremins and vintage synthesizers, constructing layered pop gems that deserve revisiting.
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - In It for the Money
    27:40 - Sun Hits the Sky
    31:42 - You Can See Me
    35:45 - Going Out
    40:08 - Tonight
    Outro - Richard III
     
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    • 1 hr 5 min
    Pollen - The Glorious Couch Life | 90s Album Review

    Pollen - The Glorious Couch Life | 90s Album Review

    You're forgiven if you tried to search for Pollen on the internet and struggled to find this band. Besides the numerous bands named Pollen, there is also the issue of their debut 1998 album The Glorious Couch Life not appearing on streaming services, rendering it hard to find for the average music listener. That's a shame, because throughout the record, Pollen finds the combination of indie rock energy tinged with a little garage and some danceable rhythms, topped with catchy melodies and smart lyrics. Shades of American bands like Superchunk, Guided By Voices, Beck, Death Cab For Cutie, and Sebadoh peak through, as well as Australian contemporaries like Screamfeeder, Ratcat, Ammonia, and Moler, permeate the sound, from the propulsive "Greater Than" and "Sin as Fast as You Can" to the angular "Walruses to Whales" and quirky "Settle the Score on the Dancefloor."
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - Million Destinations
    12:25 - Sin as Fast as You Can
    16:18 - Brighter Day
    21:28 - Settle the Score on the Dancefloor
    25:08 - Soma and Nerves of Steel
    27:56 - Special Features
    Outro - Not Rocket Science
     
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    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 47 min
    Hobey Echlin of Majesty Crush | 90s Artist Interview

    Hobey Echlin of Majesty Crush | 90s Artist Interview

    Formed in a city best known for either Motown Soul or Garage Rock, shoegazers Majesty Crush were an anomaly in the early ‘90s Detroit music scene. Inspired by the music coming out of the UK, Majesty Crush’s sound employed swirling guitars, hazy vocals, and captivating dreaminess while incorporating elements of soul and R&B. After their song “No. 1 Fan” received significant airplay during prime hours on the Windsor radio station 89X, Majesty Crush - David Stroughter (vocals), Mike Segal (guitars), Hobey Echlin (bass) and Odell Nails (drums) - signed with Dali Records, a subsidiary of Warner/Elektra and released their debut full-length, Love 15, in 1993. However, just a month after the album came out, Dali Records folded bringing Majesty Crush’s momentum to a halt and, ultimately, to an end just a few years later. Though their time was short, the band amassed a small but loyal following in the shoegaze scene of the early ‘90s and have been cited as an influence for everything from indie guitar groups to metal bands. And curators of this style of music have sought out Majesty Crush’s music to include on compilations like Third Man Records’ Southeast of Saturn which features 19 tracks from Detroit shoegaze and dream pop artists. In March 2024, Numero Group released Butterflies Don’t Go Away, a 2 LP set featuring the Love 15 album as well as singles, EPs, and rarities, all remastered from the original tapes. The package is completed by a 24-page booklet. Majesty Crush bassist Hobey Echlin joins us on this episode for a deep dive into not only his band’s career but the ‘90s independent music world. As a music journalist, Echlin has amassed a number of stories over the years and this conversation - at times - goes to places you’d never expect.
     
    Songs in this Episode:
    Intro - No. 1 Fan
    29:33 - "Club Connect" TV show intro
    33:46 - Worri
    1:25:17 - Space Between Your Moles
    1:30:47 - Where the F**k is Kevin Shields? (by PS I Love You)
    Outro - Uma
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.
     

    • 1 hr 59 min
    Dredg - Leitmotif | 90s Album Review

    Dredg - Leitmotif | 90s Album Review

    Leitmotif, released in 1999 by Los Gatos, California quartet Dredg, is a concept album exploring themes of identity and time. The album blends elements of alternative rock, progressive rock, nu-metal, and post-hardcore, showcasing the band's skillful versatility, drawing comparison to fellow California bands Tool and Deftones. With its intricate instrumentations and dynamic shifts, Leitmotif takes listeners on an emotive musical journey through its narrative arc. Where the band runs into trouble is in the indulgences, stretching out noisy outros or delayed intros far too long, and ending on an unnecessary jam below their skill set. What looks like an album quickly shrinks to something more like a long EP, missing a few tracks that focused on their talents instead of their experimentation.
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - Movement I: @45N. 180W
    13:15 - Lechium
    16:57 - Movement IV: RR
    23:40 - Penguins in the Desert
    32:13 - Traversing Through the Arctic Cold, We Search for the Spirit of Yuta
    Outro - Yatahaze
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 46 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
127 Ratings

127 Ratings

Mikez33 ,

Just found this walk through my Playlists

Excellent shows, covering the music I still mainly listen to. Spent my teens and twenties getting these CD’s while in the Toledo/ Detroit area. Keep up the great music reviews!

qwertyJYM ,

Great!

Great podcast!

id43 ,

Madchester

This review of the madchester scene seems to miss the mark a bit. I know that this is a 90s rock podcast, so either these guys are unaware, uninterested, or just aren’t covering other types of music (black music in particular) . I know they brought a guest on here. Being very enthusiastic about these bands at the time these records were being released, I’d describe the madchester sound as a mix of 60s psychedelic music and contemporary black music. The Byrds, Love and Hendrix meets Chicago and Detroit House and Public Enemy/ Eric B and Rakim era hip hop. The Happy Mondays were less specific but utilized a huge early techno influence. The marriage of guitar and dance elements, sampled beats mixed with jangly guitars. Stone Roses are like a druggy, more black influenced Smiths because the songs are well crafted and pretty. As for New Order, they were pioneers of this type of dance/rock mixture. If anything, it’s closest American analog would be Grunge. It was a sound, a look, and an attitude. Not all madchester bands were from Manchester, just like all the grunge bands weren’t from Seattle. Nobody wore baggy clothes until these guys did. Even Chuck D had tight jeans on at this point.

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