712 episodes

Weekly episodes digging up lost and forgotten 90s rock — in-depth album reviews, roundtable discussions, and artist interviews that reveal the unique story of the 90s.

Dig Me Out: 90s Rock Dig Me Out

    • Music
    • 4.4 • 127 Ratings

Weekly episodes digging up lost and forgotten 90s rock — in-depth album reviews, roundtable discussions, and artist interviews that reveal the unique story of the 90s.

    The Hookers - Black Visions of Crimson Wisdom

    The Hookers - Black Visions of Crimson Wisdom

    The 1999 album Black Visions of Crimson Wisdom by The Hookers is a loud, pummeling rock record that draws influence from the New Wave of British Heavy Metal as well as '80s hardcore and punk. Guitar riffs that would sound at home on Iron Maiden or Judas Priest albums rip while a thundering rhythm section propels the band with hardcore energy, keeping the songs short and tight and the album under thirty minutes. That turns out to be the right move, as the pummeling sound of the band never lets up, and lead singer Adam Neal has one gear - full-throat-shredding-throttle.
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - Maximum Overdrive
    19:03 - Behold God's Candy
    23:38 - Black Magic Stallion
    27:10 - The End Is Comin'
    47:09 - Ride The Dragon To The Crimson Light
    Outro - Ball Crusher Love Machine
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 1 hr
    The Brady Bunch Lawnmower Massacre - Desperate Football | 90s Album Review

    The Brady Bunch Lawnmower Massacre - Desperate Football | 90s Album Review

    In a bar in Perth, Australia in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Fred Negro and his various bands tore through country-tinged punk rock soaked in beer and satire. One of these incarnations was The Brady Bunch Lawnmower Massacre, a short-lived name that produced a single, an EP, and the 1992 album Desperate Football. Like fellow garage post-punks The Scientists or The Birthday Party, on the surface the sound is big, loud and messy. But repeated listens reveal tighter than anticipated musicianship with some chorus hooks that will stay in your brain longer than expected.
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - Drink Myself to Live
    20:21 - Nothing on Telly
    24:59 - When Jesus Goes Surfing
    31:09 - Carpark
    36:00 - Blood Money
    Outro - I've Only Got One Dick
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Jawbreaker - Dear You | 90s Album Review

    Jawbreaker - Dear You | 90s Album Review

    By the time 1995 rolled around, punk had exploded into the mainstream thanks to releases the previous year by Green Day and The Offspring, as well as Bad Religion, Rancid, NOFX, and many more. It was also the year Jawbreaker released their third album 24 Hour Revenge Therapy, as well as the year they made the jump to a major label for their fourth and final album, Dear You. Showcasing a departure from their earlier raw sound towards a more polished, melodic approach, the band faced criticism from some punk purists who felt the band had strayed too far from their DIY roots, with accusations of selling out and alienating their hardcore fanbase. Despite the divided opinions, the album's impact has endured, influencing subsequent generations of punk and alternative rock musicians.
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - I Love You So Much It's Killing Us Both
    19:00 - Save Your Generation
    30:10 - Bad Scene, Everyone's Fault
    42:04 - Oyster
    Outro - Fireman
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 47 min
    Indigo Girls - Swamp Ophelia | 90s Album Review

    Indigo Girls - Swamp Ophelia | 90s Album Review

    Released in 1994, the Indigo Girls' fifth album "Swamp Ophelia" marked a significant chapter in their career, following the critical and commercial success of their earlier works. The album, co-produced by Peter Collins, showcases the duo's distinctive harmonies and poignant songwriting, seamlessly blending folk and rock influences. Tracks like "Galileo" and "Power of Two" became anthems of the era, displaying their lyrical prowess and melodic charm. "Swamp Ophelia" received acclaim for its introspective and socially conscious themes, tackling issues such as love, identity, and environmental concerns. Despite its positive reception, the album leans towards a more polished sound compared to their previous works, potentially sacrificing some of the rawness that defined their earlier releases.
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - Fugitive
    15:16 - Reunion
    21:37 - The Wood Song
    31:17 - The Power of Two
    45:09 - Touch Me Fall
    Outro - Least Complicated
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 53 min
    Albums of 1994 | 90s Roundtable

    Albums of 1994 | 90s Roundtable

    In our latest and final "Albums of..." roundtable, we're tackling what might have been the most prolific year for releases of the entire decade. With the major labels scooping up bands to ride the alternative and grunge wave explosion into mainstream radio and on MTV, 1994 saw not only huge album releases from Soundgarden, Pearl Jam, Stone Temple Pilots, Nine Inch Nails, Alice In Chains, R.E.M. Nirvana, and more, but also the punk explosion thanks to Green Day, The Offspring, Rancid, Bad Religion, and others. This was also the year that across the pond from the US, Britpop topped the charts in the UK thanks to Blur and Oasis, while a new wave of alternative bands shot up the charts like Veruca Salt, Bush, Live, Weezer, Toadies, etc. while the indie underground produced classic records from Pavement, Guided By Voices, Low, Stereolab, Sebadoh, and Superchunk, to name a few. For a big year, we have a big group with a super-sized length. Enjoy!
     
    Songs In This Episode:
    Intro - 1994 Medley (Interstate Love Song by Stone Temple Pilots, Loser by Beck, Self Esteem by The Offspring, Buddy Holly by Weezer, I'm Broken by Pantera, March of the Pigs by Nine Inch Nails)
    16:05 - Last Goodbye by Jeff Buckley
    23:36 - Girls & Boys by Blur
    39:10 - Everything Zen by Bush
    50:25 - Very Best Years by The Grays
    1:07:19 - Suffering by Satchel
    1:13:30 - Bernie by Failure
    1:30:40 - I Am I by Queensrÿche
    1:50:51 - Feel The Pain by Dinosaur Jr.
    Outro - Faster by Manic Street Preachers
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 2 hr
    Love Nut - ¡Baltimucho! | 90s Album Review

    Love Nut - ¡Baltimucho! | 90s Album Review

    Although only active for a short time in the 1990s, Baltimore, Maryland's Love Nut still managed to bounce from indie to major labels back to the indies over the course of their two albums. Originally recorded for Interscope Records, the band ended up releasing their second and last album on the smaller label Big Deal, meaning more freedom but less budget money for promotion and marketing. Which is a shame, because revisiting ¡Baltimucho! it's clear the band were ripe for discovery with big, hooky power pop choruses that leaned on the 70s glam pop of Sweet as much as Cheap Trick. 
     
    Songs In This Episode
    Intro - Love Found You
    15:58 - Everchanging World
    21:20 - Bomb Pine
    26:48: Everything Is Going Your Way
    34:48 - Crop Duster
    Outro - Stolen Picture
     
    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.
    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 1 hr 14 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
127 Ratings

127 Ratings

Mikez33 ,

Just found this walk through my Playlists

Excellent shows, covering the music I still mainly listen to. Spent my teens and twenties getting these CD’s while in the Toledo/ Detroit area. Keep up the great music reviews!

qwertyJYM ,

Great!

Great podcast!

id43 ,

Madchester

This review of the madchester scene seems to miss the mark a bit. I know that this is a 90s rock podcast, so either these guys are unaware, uninterested, or just aren’t covering other types of music (black music in particular) . I know they brought a guest on here. Being very enthusiastic about these bands at the time these records were being released, I’d describe the madchester sound as a mix of 60s psychedelic music and contemporary black music. The Byrds, Love and Hendrix meets Chicago and Detroit House and Public Enemy/ Eric B and Rakim era hip hop. The Happy Mondays were less specific but utilized a huge early techno influence. The marriage of guitar and dance elements, sampled beats mixed with jangly guitars. Stone Roses are like a druggy, more black influenced Smiths because the songs are well crafted and pretty. As for New Order, they were pioneers of this type of dance/rock mixture. If anything, it’s closest American analog would be Grunge. It was a sound, a look, and an attitude. Not all madchester bands were from Manchester, just like all the grunge bands weren’t from Seattle. Nobody wore baggy clothes until these guys did. Even Chuck D had tight jeans on at this point.

Top Podcasts In Music

The Joe Budden Network
Friday Night Karaoke
Barstool Sports
SiriusXM
Andrew Hickey
Double Elvis Productions

You Might Also Like

Life of the Record
UPROXX
Rolling Stone | Cumulus Podcast Network
Craig Finn & Talkhouse
Sound Opinions
Turned Out A Punk