100 episodes

A podcast devoted to assisting you in living out your potential by helping you recognize and apply key principles for living that will empower you to transform your own life through positive change and transition. You have been called to live a fulfilled and joy-filled life, yet too often we allow circumstances to interfere, impede, and deny us progressive living. This podcast discusses the critical aspects of understanding who you are, Whose you are, and what you're here for, helping you identify your passion and purpose while establishing and maintaining a proper perspective. Focus is given to intentional living through a right mindset and accepting responsibility for our attitudes and actions. Also discussed are elements specific to life coaching, including topics such as successful Christian living, communication, relationships and marriage, leadership, academics, life transitions, mid-life, health and fitness, personal and professional development, organization, purposeful living, and more.

DTLC Radio Dr. David Turpen

    • Christianity

A podcast devoted to assisting you in living out your potential by helping you recognize and apply key principles for living that will empower you to transform your own life through positive change and transition. You have been called to live a fulfilled and joy-filled life, yet too often we allow circumstances to interfere, impede, and deny us progressive living. This podcast discusses the critical aspects of understanding who you are, Whose you are, and what you're here for, helping you identify your passion and purpose while establishing and maintaining a proper perspective. Focus is given to intentional living through a right mindset and accepting responsibility for our attitudes and actions. Also discussed are elements specific to life coaching, including topics such as successful Christian living, communication, relationships and marriage, leadership, academics, life transitions, mid-life, health and fitness, personal and professional development, organization, purposeful living, and more.

    Five Phases of Spiritual Growth (116)

    Five Phases of Spiritual Growth (116)

    Understanding the five phases of your spiritual life is critical to your success. Remember the key questions we focus on here at DTLC? Who are you? Whose are you? Why are you here? Recognizing the five phases you go through in life - from a spiritual perspective - will make all the difference.







    Every Person Included







    Every single person is in one of these five phases of their spiritual life. Recall from our study in Romans 5 that we are all born in a state of "original grace." From conception to the age of accountability, we are covered by the grace of God.







    Every child ever born was and is born in grace. Even though they may still be susceptible to defects, disease, or even physical death, every child is promised a redemptive resurrection. That means a new body and life eternal with God.







    At the age of accountability, when a person comprehends that law comes from God, each person becomes accountable. Therefore, personal law breaking becomes personal sin. From this point forward we live subject to sin and its power, as slaves. Our spirit dies and our body is under the power of sin. Paul calls this "living under law" and "in the flesh" (Rom. 6:14; 7:5). We are now guilty and powerless to sin. But the "much more" of the cross ( Rom. 5:15-19) covers even our personal sin.







    Amazing Grace







    When we hear the gospel - the full gospel, including the law and our guilt under it - and accept it as true, we place our faith in the saving work of Jesus. We are converted through faith in baptism and God's grace is applied. Our "old" spirit is resurrected to new life (Rom. 6:4). Our penalty is paid and our spirit is "born again." But this new life affects only the spirit.







    The Struggle Phase







    The problem is that our new spirit must continue to reside in a corrupted physical body. A body that is controlled by sin and if allowed, has the power to overcome our "new nature." The struggle is real but it is also necessary.







    It can be summed up in three words: power, struggle, and victory. The indwelling of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:38; Romans 8:9, 11) gives us power to overcome the power of sin still dwelling in our bodies. Living the Christian life is about recognizing this struggle, embracing it, and learning to overpower it. This is why Paul can "rejoice in our tribulations" (Rom. 5:3-5).







    Final Victory







    The last of these five phases is our total victory, when we shed these bodies in physical death. We will have some victories in this life and the goal is to have as many as possible. But regardless of how many, so long as we continue to "fight the good fight of faith" we are assured of total victory. We will be glorified. We will one day rid ourselves of these sinful bodies and replace them with redeemed and glorified ones. This is our hope - this is His promise.







    Understanding these five phases is key to your success in life. It's also critical to understanding what Paul is talking about - and what he is not talking about - in this next major section of Romans.







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    Study Romans From the Beginning

    • 1 hr 2 min
    An Overview of Romans 6-8 (115)

    An Overview of Romans 6-8 (115)

    Romans chapters 6-8 is certainly, "where the rubber meets the road." Paul has spent the letter telling us how we are all under the law and face due judgment for having broken it. Then, he tells us the amazing good news of the gospel! God, through His grace, has offered us salvation. Through faith in Christ we can have our sins forgiven. That is great news!







    But Wait, There's More







    But sin has not just left accountable for a debt we can't pay. It has also corrupted our spirit AND our body. Sin has left us us powerless over it - sin has become our tyrannical master - and we are its slaves. Not only do I need to be justified - have my sins forgiven - but I need to be "born again." Why?







    Because my spirit is "dead in its trespasses and sins" (Ephesians 2:1-5). I need "new life" if I'm to live. In baptism (see Romans 6:3-4) I'm "born again" by the power of the Holy Spirit (i.e. "baptism of the Spirit"). My sins are forgiven (justification) and I'm regenerated. I now have a new spirit for a new life. What is the new life? A life of striving to increase in my obedience to my Creator...now called my Father, as I'm now his child (John 1:12).







    New Spirit - Old Body







    However, I still have a problem. Yes, my sins are forgiven. Yes, I'm born again and now have a redeemed spirit. But I still have this "body of sin and death." My new spirit has to still live in a corrupted body. Worse, this body still has powerful influence over me because it's still full of sin. What's the answer?







    The answer is the indwelling of the Holy Spirit (see Acts 2:38-39; Romans 8). He is the One who will give me power to overcome the sin within me. Even Paul had this struggle (Romans 7:7-24) and had to learn how to "walk by the Spirit." In fact, EVERY Christian will have this struggle. The struggle is actually good news as well. Hard to believe but true.







    Where The Rubber Meets The Road







    Romans chapters 6-8 is Paul's description of "where the rubber meets the road." Here he tells us what to expect, what to remember, what to count on, and how to live. He's talking about the second part of the double cure. How do redeemed people live in unredeemed bodies? More specifically, what is the role of the law of God in relation to His grace?







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    Study Romans from the Beginning

    • 1 hr 20 min
    You Have Already Transitioned (114)

    You Have Already Transitioned (114)

    You have already transitioned! Romans chapter six begins a new section of Paul's letter to the church at Rome. For five chapters he has presented the gospel of grace and the inability of the law to save. But does that mean that we have no more relationship to the law? Are we to conclude that we no longer bear any responsibility to keeping it?







    Justification to Regeneration and Sanctification







    Paul begins this new section by reminding his Christian readers that they too have already transitioned. Having your sins forgiven and your penalty paid is only half of the story. In fact, it's only half of the cure.







    Remember that sin causes a double curse on us. First, we become guilty of sin - of having broken the law of God - and are therefore responsible for its due penalty. Second, we are infected by the disease of sin. It infects our spirit AND our physical body. Paul refers to this as our flesh. This renders us cursed with the second part - powerlessness over the sin in us. God's response (grace) is to provide us with a double cure.







    First, we are forgiven - we have our penalty paid on our behalf - through faith in Christ. Second, we are re-created - born again, regenerated - and given a new spirit. However, this new spirit must continue to dwell in a still-corrupted physical body (i.e. the flesh). At least for a time.







    Transitioned







    But more than that, we are also granted the gift of the indwelling Holy Spirit (Acts 2:38-39). Why? Because His presence gives us the power to overcome the sin that continues to dwell within our flesh. But how and when did this happen?







    You transitioned from diseased (cursed) to surgery (justified and regenerated) to the road to recovery (cured/sanctification) in your baptism (Romans 6:3-7). How does this happen? Through faith in the working of God (Colossians 2:11-12). Reminding of us this reality is Paul's point in these first verses of Romans six.







    One Baptism







    In Ephesians 4:5, Paul makes the declarative statement that there is "one baptism." Not two, not only spiritual baptism, but one baptism that includes both physical water and Holy Spirit (see John 3:3-8; Acts 2:38-41; 8:34-39). The idea that there are two different baptisms - one water and one spiritual - is completely foreign to the Bible. Paul affirms this reality here in Romans 6 and elsewhere (e.g. Eph 4:5; Col. 2:12).







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    Study Romans From the Beginning







    Resources







    Baptism: A Biblical Study - by Dr. Jack Cottrell

    • 51 min
    Merry Christmas & Happy New Year (113)

    Merry Christmas & Happy New Year (113)

    The true meaning of Christmas.







    Wishing you and your family a very Merry Christmas and a safe and Happy New Year!







    See you next year - 2020!







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    The Gift of the Magi - written by O. Henry (1905); Narrated by Lorne Greene







    Peanuts - Charlie Brown & Linus van Pelt - Merry Christmas, Charlie Brown! - created by Charles M. Schultz







    Song Credit: Come Thou Long Expected Jesus by King's Kaleidoscope.

    • 24 min
    Biblical Assurance of Salvation (112)

    Biblical Assurance of Salvation (112)

    There is a widespread belief in Christianity that once a person becomes saved, they remained saved no matter what. Not only can you be certain of your salvation (as the teaching goes), you have God's guarantee that you can never lose it. The question is, does this "once saved always saved" teaching agree with the biblical view of assurance? Once a person is saved, do they remain saved forever regardless of any action/belief on their - or anyone else's - part?







    Augustinian Roots of Once Saved Always Saved







    The roots of this doctrine - just as with the whole of the T.U.L.I.P. doctrines - are found in the teaching of Augustine. It wasn't until 412 AD that Augustine became the first Christian to write in support of these teachings. Prior to that, every Christian author (i.e. the Patristics/Church Fathers), including Augustine himself (386-411 AD), who addressed these issues did so from a condemning perspective. Why? Because although Augustine was the first "christian" to write in support, the arguments and doctrines surfaced first in the heresies of pagan thought and religion. Specifically, the "five points of Calvinism" (as they became known), and Reformed theology's definitions of sovereignty, divine foreknowledge, and depravity as total, are first found in the teachings of Gnosticism, Stoicism, Neoplatonism, and Manichaeanism. In fact, the church (as early as Paul in Acts) had already previously identified and condemned these as false. (read Dr. Ken Wilson for more)







    Augustine's latter writings and teaching functionally eliminated human free will. The result was the teaching that man is completely unable to respond to God, unless and until, He first completes a spiritual work within him (i.e. regeneration). Only then will the previously unconditionally elected receive the gifts of faith and repentance. Since, according to this view, you don't have a choice to accept God and be saved, neither do you have a choice as to whether or not you remain saved. Thus, the result is guaranteed perseverance or once your saved, you remain saved forever. This is the "P" in T.U.L.I.P.







    Apparent Biblical Support for Once Saved Always Saved







    Those who accept and teach this Augustinian-Calvinist theology do so with numerous Scriptures purported to support this and the other T.U.L.I.P. doctrines. The problem is that these presumed proof texts do not teach unconditional perseverance. Certainly, they teach assurance. But biblical assurance is based upon the continued consistent meeting of the condition of faith. Faith is the very condition upon which salvation was given to us in the first place. We are justified by faith...and we remain justified by that same faith. Meaning, that if a person of their own free will - the same free will with which they accepted Christ - chooses to fall into unbelief (cf. Romans 4:18-21; 1 Peter 1:5), they can forfeit their redemption.







    The Bible is full of examples of how a person might "fall from grace" (Galatians 5:1-6). Others include John 8, John 15, Romans 11, Colossians 1:21-23, 1 Corinthians 15:1-2, Hebrews 6:4-8, the Parable of the Sower in Matthew 13, and many others. How does one fall from grace?







    You can commit spiritual suicide. Giving up on your faith and renouncing Christ or God because of tragic or negative circumstances is the most common. You can "die to faith" through slow starvation and failing to "feed" yourself spiritually through God's Word. This warning is persistent in the New Testament. You can be strangled by sin and continuing to intentionally live in it (we'll study this next in Romans 6). Romans 8:13 says "if you are living according to the flesh, you must die; but if by the Spirit you are putting to death the deeds of the body, you will live."







    You Can Forfeit Grace

    • 1 hr 23 min
    Doctrine Matters – TULIPs Aren’t Roses (111)

    Doctrine Matters – TULIPs Aren’t Roses (111)

    Doctrine matters! Well, of course it does! What you believe and why you believe it effects and influences every aspect of your life. To pretend otherwise is to, well, pretend otherwise. The passage of Romans we just studied (i.e. Romans 1-5) and the passage we're about to begin (i.e. ch. 6-8) teach and solidify several truths.







    Among these truths are the "ordo slutis" (the order of salvation), original sin (as a concept), original grace (as a reality), confession, faith, and baptism as parts of the plan of salvation. Paul also addresses the reality of sin, the responsibility of being saved, the ongoing struggle with sin, and the power of the Holy Spirit. But before moving on to these it is important to acknowledge the significant differences between two opposing views.







    Augustinian-Calvinism







    The differences between Augustinian-Calvinism (aka Reformed theology) and non-Calvinist theology (i.e. historical/traditional theology) is proof that doctrine matters. Several of the key components of T.U.L.I.P. - the self-applied acronym of Reformed theology's principle doctrines - are found in Romans. At least that is what Calvinists would have us believe. Problem is, the concepts are in fact there, just not in the way they think they are. The Bible actually teaches the contrary of T.U.L.I.P. (Acquired Partial Depravity, Conditional Election, Unlimited Atonement, Resistible Grace, & Assurance By Faith).







    Another problem with Augustinian-Calvinism is found in its philosophical roots. That is, where the concepts of theistic determinism (i.e. T.U.L.I.P.) actually come from. For example, Stoicism, Gnoticism, Neoplatonism, & Manichaeism - all identified by the church as heresies prior to Augustine - each teach one or more of Reformed theology's foundational concepts. When confronted with various questions from the Pelagians, Augustine reverted to his prior teaching and understanding that was rooted in these false teachings.







    Additionally, Augustinian-Calvinism's presuppositional definitions can be found in these philosophies as well. The fact is that the theology of Augustinian-Calvinism requires eisegetical interpretation of Scripture (as opposed of exegetical). Meaning, the foundation of Augustinian-Calvinism is built on sand ( cf. Matthew 24-27). Ultimately, sound systematic theology is only as good as its foundation. Think Leaning Tower of Pisa.







    Doctrine Matters







    Unless you're completely new to this podcast, then you're fully aware that I am not a Calvinist. My goal in going through Romans is first to establish sound doctrine and second to refute (or at least point out) false doctrine. In this episode I briefly discuss the prominent differences between Augustinian-Calvinism and the biblical view. For more detailed discussion I refer you to the resources listed below.







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    Study Romans From The Beginning By Clicking Here







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    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES THAT ADDRESS AUGUSTINIAN-CALVINISM







    The Foundation of Augustinian-Calvinism - Wilson (book)







    Augustine's Conversion from Traditional Free Choice to 'non-Free Free Will': A Comprehensive Methodology (Studien Und Texte Zu Antike Und Christentum / Studies and Texts in Antiquity and Christianity) Wilson (book)







    Soteriology 101 - Dr. Leighton Flowers' website







    Soteriology 101 - YouTube Channel







    Was Augustine The First To Introduce "Calvinism" Into The Church? (Flowers & Wilson)







    Did The Early Church Fathers Teach "Calvinism"? (Flowers & Wilson)







    Was "Calvinism"Introduced By Augustine?

    • 1 hr 50 min

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