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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

    Money Talks: Berkshire after Buffett

    Money Talks: Berkshire after Buffett

    Now that the world’s most celebrated investor has named a successor, the conglomerate he created must face some hard truths. Also, as companies wrestle with thorny issues from climate change to voting rights, economist Dambisa Moyo argues corporate boards need a makeover. And, the pandemic has coaxed millions of older people online—now companies are racing to keep up with the silver surfers. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts 


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    Cache and carry: American states’ gun-law push

    Cache and carry: American states’ gun-law push

    Today another state will enact a “permitless carry” law—no licence, checks or training required. We ask why states’ loosening of safeguards fails to reflect public sentiment. Brexit has supercharged Scottish nationalism, and this week’s elections may pave the way to another independence referendum. And a long-forgotten coffee species may weather the climate-change era.
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    Babbage: Belt, road and orbit

    Babbage: Belt, road and orbit

    China recently launched the first module of its new space station—what impact will this have on the international scientific community? Also, how orbiting telescopes could be useful in diagnosing cancer. And when solving problems, why do people prefer to innovate by adding things rather than getting rid of them? Kenneth Cukier hosts 


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    Strait shooting? The growing peril to Taiwan

    Strait shooting? The growing peril to Taiwan

    A decades-old policy of “strategic ambiguity” is breaking down; we ask about the risks and the stakes of a potential Chinese bid to take Taiwan by force. The number of diseases jumping from animals to humans is set to keep rising; we look at why, and how to make the jump rarer. And the misguided mission to understand canine communication. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    The Jab: Might vaccine diplomacy misfire?

    The Jab: Might vaccine diplomacy misfire?

    Vaccines have become a tool of global influence. China and Russia have sent millions of doses abroad, but the West has lagged in vaccine diplomacy. What are the risks and rewards?


    Agathe Demarais of The Economist Intelligence Unit, who wrote a report on the subject, tells The Jab how China and Russia’s vaccine diplomacy could backfire.


    Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Edward Carr, The Economist’s deputy editor, and Argentina correspondent David Smith.


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    The turn at a century: Northern Ireland’s anniversary

    The turn at a century: Northern Ireland’s anniversary

    The province’s largest party aligned with Britain has lost its leader; in the 100 years since the island was split it has rarely seemed so close to reuniting. Diplomacy, as with so much else, had to go online during the pandemic—and emerged more efficient and inclusive than many expected. And how art-lovers are getting ever more fully immersed. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
2.7K Ratings

2.7K Ratings

100West ,

CEOutrage

Thanks for today’s episode. I think one important issue was left out of the discussion: there is NO other country in the world that has produced such a great number of corporate Titans. Starting from the industrialization age to our days. These Titans have become entrepreneurship role moles but also social-economic actors and influencers -think Ford and how his treated his workers, Carnegie and his philanthropic initiatives, etc-. It is true they follow the bottom line but also they were able to have strong opinions about the societies of their time. Ergo, I am no surprised our CEOs are taking a stand not only because of the bottom line but also because they have strong opinions how they see societies evolving. Shareholders are not longer WASP, now black, yellow and brown are shareholders too. 😉

Julien_Sorel ,

Terrific

Well-produced, very informative.

123Massi ,

The Jab: few facts and just opinions

Partisan, ideological and demagogic to appeal a certain audience

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